The Ghost of Cognition Past, or Thinking Like An Algorithm – BLDGBLOG


23 bookmarks. First posted by yhancik 12 days ago.


Assuming I have read Bridle’s essay correctly—and it is entirely possible I have not—he seems disturbed by the content of these videos. I think the more troubling aspect, however, is in how they suggest kids should think. They replace narrative reason with algorithmic recommendation, connecting events and objects in weird, illogical bursts lacking any semblance of internal coherence, where the sudden appearance of something completely irrelevant can nonetheless be explained because of its keyword-search frequency. Having a conversation with someone who thinks like this—who “thinks” like this—would be utterly alien, if not logically impossible.

So, to return to this post’s beginning, one of the thrills of thinking like a writer, so to speak, is precisely in how it encourages one to bring together things that might not otherwise belong on the same page, and to work toward understanding why these apparently unrelated subjects might secretly be connected.

But what is thinking like an algorithm?
algorithms  socialmedia 
5 days ago by ayjay
The Ghost of Cognition Past, or Thinking Like An Algorithm [Image: Wiring the ENIAC; via Wired ] One of many things I love about writing—that is, engaging in writing as an activity—is how it facilitates a discovery of…
IFTTT  Instapaper 
7 days ago by ldodds
Algorithm
tech 
7 days ago by engles
The Ghost of Cognition Past, or Thinking Like An Algorithm via Instapaper http://bit.ly/2AubwKS
[Image: Wiring the ENIAC; via Wired ] One of many things I love about writing—that is, engaging in writing as an activity—is how it facilitates a discovery of…
instapaper 
9 days ago by patrick
What I think is unsettling here is slightly different, on the other hand. The content, in my opinion, is simply strange: a kind of low-rent surrealism for kids, David Lynch-lite for toddlers. For thousands of years, western folktales have featured cannibals, incest, haunted houses, even John Carpenter-like biological transformations, from woman to tree, or from man to pig and back again. Children burn to death on chariots in the sky or sons fall from atmospheric heights into the sea. These myths seem more nightmarish—on the level of content—than some of Bridle’s chosen YouTube videos.

Instead, I would argue, what’s disturbing here is what the content suggests about how things should be connected. The real risk would seem to be that children exposed to recommendation algorithms at an early age might begin to emulate them cognitively, learning how to think, reason, and associate based on inhuman leaps of machine logic.
technology  children  thinking 
9 days ago by xianoforange
*Okay, even by Geoff Manaugh's generous standards, that's gotta be one of his weirdest riffs ever.
from twitter_favs
11 days ago by genmon
Assuming I have read Bridle’s essay correctly—and it is entirely possible I have not—he seems disturbed by the content of these videos. I think the more troubling aspect, however, is in how they suggest kids should think. They replace narrative reason with algorithmic recommendation, connecting events and objects in weird, illogical bursts lacking any semblance of internal coherence, where the sudden appearance of something completely irrelevant can nonetheless be explained because of its keyword-search frequency.
writing  algorithm  cognition 
11 days ago by madamim
[Image: Wiring the ENIAC; via Wired ] One of many things I love about writing—that is, engaging in writing as an activity—is how it facilitates a discovery of…
from instapaper
12 days ago by loganrhyne
One of many things I love about writing—that is, engaging in writing as an activity—is how it facilitates a discovery of connections between otherwise unrelated things. via Pocket
pocket  favorites 
12 days ago by bschlagel
[Image: Wiring the ENIAC; via Wired ] One of many things I love about writing—that is, engaging in writing as an activity—is how it facilitates a discovery of…
from instapaper
12 days ago by yudha87
I think the more troubling aspect, however, is in how they suggest kids should think. They replace narrative reason with algorithmic recommendation, connecting events and objects in weird, illogical bursts lacking any semblance of internal coherence, where the sudden appearance of something completely irrelevant can nonetheless be explained because of its keyword-search frequency. Having a conversation with someone who thinks like this—who “thinks” like this—would be utterly alien, if not logically impossible.

So, to return to this post’s beginning, one of the thrills of thinking like a writer, so to speak, is precisely in how it encourages one to bring together things that might not otherwise belong on the same page, and to work toward understanding why these apparently unrelated subjects might secretly be connected.

But what is thinking like an algorithm?
bldgblog  algorithms 
12 days ago by yhancik