The House That Spied on Me


138 bookmarks. First posted by schraeds february 2018.


We recently got rid of our Amazon Echo and Google Home. This piece reflects some of the reasons why.
from twitter
5 weeks ago by aezell
In December, I converted my one-bedroom apartment in San Francisco into a “smart home.” I connected as many of my appliances and belongings as I could to the internet: an Amazon Echo, my lights, my coffee maker, my baby monitor, my kid’s toys, my vacuum, my TV, my toothbrush, a photo frame, a sex toy, and even my bed. Thanks to the Internet of Things, I could live in my very own tech-mediated Downton Abbey. That’s the appeal of smart homes for most people, and why they are supposed to be a $27 billion market by 2021. But that wasn’t my primary motivation. The reason I smartened up my house was to find out whether it would betray me. I installed internet-connected devices to serve me, but by making the otherwise inanimate objects of my home “smart” and giving them internet-connected “brains,” I was also giving them the ability to gather information about my home and the people in it. One person I knew it would be leaking to was my colleague, Surya Mattu, because he built a special router to monitor the devices monitoring me.
gizmodo, 07.02.2018
internet_iot  tech_tv_smart  überwachung_raum_smarthome  überwachung_panopticon_lifelogging_selftracking  überwachung_panopticon_postprivacy  überwachung_akustisch  absurdität_kuriosität  privatsphäre  überwachung_verhalten  überwachung_konditionierung_disziplinierung  unternehmen_allg_daten_analyse_handel  überwachung_kunden 
5 weeks ago by kraven
“The camera’s not working,” I texted my husband.

He replied that he had unplugged it.

“It was staring at me while I made coffee,” he texted back.

I told him I needed it plugged in for the story to monitor the data flows and he said he would do it. But as the days passed in Spain it remained offline and I stopped bothering him about it. (The acceptance of complete surveillance had not been part of our marriage vows.)
longread  patreon  patron:julie 
8 weeks ago by rosscatrow
Kashmir In December, I converted my one-bedroom apartment in San Francisco into a “smart home.” I connected as many of my appliances and belongings as I could…
from instapaper
9 weeks ago by nertzy
The larger pattern that emerged about the smart home was that all of the devices phoned home daily, even if they hadn’t been used, telling the companies that made them, “Hey. I’m still here. I’ve still got power. Have any updates for me?”
privacy  security  surveillance  Technology 
10 weeks ago by Gwendoux
The number of devices alone that are detected chattering away will be used to determine our socioeconomic status. Our homes could become like internet browsers, with unique digital fingerprints, that will be mined for profit just like our daily Web surfing is. If you have a smart home, it’s open house on your data.
ss  IOT 
12 weeks ago by seaugust
Via SeriouslyFab. Kashmir In December, I converted my one-bedroom apartment in San Francisco into a “smart home.” I connected as many of my appliances and…
from instapaper
february 2018 by evrenk
The fantasy of the smart home is that it will save us time and effort, but the friction involved in getting various devices from different companies to work together meant that many things took longer to do.
home  technology 
february 2018 by foliovision
In December, I converted my one-bedroom apartment in San Francisco into a “smart home.” I connected as many of my appliances and belongings as I could to the internet: an Amazon Echo, my lights, my coffee maker, my baby monitor, my kid’s toys, my vacuum, my TV, my toothbrush, a photo frame, a sex toy, and even my bed.
surveillance 
february 2018 by zesteur
"I thought the house would take care of me but instead everything in it now had the power to ask me to do things. Ultimately, I’m not going to warn you against making everything in your home smart because of the privacy risks, although there are quite a few. I’m going to warn you against a smart home because living in it is annoying as hell."
privacy  technology  surveillance  technology-is-not-the-solution-for-everything  internet  future  obvious 
february 2018 by ssam
I thought the house would take care of me but instead everything in it now had the power to ask me to do things.
iot  privacy  security  surveillance 
february 2018 by soobrosa
Kashmir Hill and Surya Matta:
<p>
Matta: Yes, I am basically Kashmir’s sentient home. Kashmir wanted to know what it would be like to live in a smart home and I wanted to find out what the digital emissions from that home would reveal about her. Cybersecurity wasn’t my focus. (I wasn’t interested in hacking her sex toy or any of her other belongings.) Privacy was. What could I tell about the patterns of her and her family’s life by passively gathering the data trails from her belongings? How often were the devices talking? Could I tell what the people inside were doing on an hourly basis based on what I saw?

Using a Raspberry Pi computer, I built a router with a Wi-Fi network called “iotea” (I’m not very good at naming things) to which Kashmir connected all of her devices, so that I could capture the smart home’s network activity. In other words, I could see every time the devices were talking to servers outside the home.

I had the same view of Kashmir’s house that her Internet Service Provider (ISP) has. After Congress voted last year to allow ISPs to spy on and sell their customers’ internet usage data, we were all warned that the ISPs could now sell our browsing activity, or records of what we do on our computers and smartphones. But in fact, they have access to more than that. If you have any smart devices in your home—a TV that connects to the internet, an Echo, a Withings scale—your ISP can see and sell information about that activity too. With my “iotea” router I was seeing the information about Kashmir and her family that Comcast, her ISP, could monitor and sell.</p>

All very scary, really. And inconvenient: she needed 14 different apps (and accounts) to control it all, and the lights wouldn't listen to the Alexa, and "smart coffee was also a world of hell". (The dream of making-coffee-at-a-distance just won't go away.)
surveillance  iot 
february 2018 by charlesarthur
The House That Spied on Me
from twitter
february 2018 by kejadlen
After a week of living in my newly smartened home, I could tell why the Beast was always in such a bad mood: The animate objects in my home were becoming a constant source of annoyance. I thought this was going to be a story about privacy, but instead I was finding out how infuriating it is to live in a janky smart home.
wave6  privacy  fail  measurement  security 
february 2018 by dancall
Kashmir In December, I converted my one-bedroom apartment in San Francisco into a “smart home.” I connected as many of my appliances and belongings as I could…
from instapaper
february 2018 by michaelfox
In which the writer creates a “smart home” by connecting every appliance to the internet. “I had to download 14 apps to my phone, creating an account for each one”. Smart they were not. “It took at least two hours to get our Christmas lights plugged into smart plugs, and then to get those plugs online with their apps, and then to get those apps to talk to the Alexa app.” As for privacy, forget it. “All of the anxiety you feel about being tracked online moves into your living room”
smarthome  privacy  security  thefuture 
february 2018 by JohnDrake
Kashmir In December, I converted my one-bedroom apartment in San Francisco into a “smart home.” I connected as many of my appliances and belongings as I could…
from instapaper
february 2018 by iany
The House That Spied on Me
from twitter
february 2018 by fanficforensics
“Ask Behmor (pronunciation: Be-more) to brew me coffee.”

“Behmor,” she would respond. “A passion for coffee. How can I help you?”

“Brew me coffee.”

“I don’t understand,” she would respond. This was especially aggravating for two caffeine-addicted people who had not yet had their coffee. Sometimes we would keep rephrasing the question until she got it, but more often, one of us would just get up, walk to the kitchen and press the button on the coffeemaker rather than doing it the “smart” way.

---


“The camera’s not working,” I texted my husband.

He replied that he had unplugged it.

“It was staring at me while I made coffee,” he texted back.
privacy  security  surveillance  iot  future  singularity 
february 2018 by imaginaryfriend
100j or pair with Cowan on more work for mother in 100g. Great article about what data is transmitted by smart homes. Could be an example of a student project too.
teaching 
february 2018 by scritic
The reason I smartened up my house was to find out whether it would betray me.
I installed internet-connected devices to serve me, but by making the otherwise inanimate objects of my home “smart” and giving them internet-connected “brains,” I was also giving them the ability to gather information about my home and the people in it. The company that sold me my internet-connected vacuum, for example, recently said that it collects a “rich map of the home” and plans to one day share it with Apple, Amazon, or Alphabet, the three companies that hope to dominate the smart home market. Once I made my home smart, what would it learn and whom would it tell?

One person I knew it would be leaking to was my colleague, Surya Mattu, because he built a special router to monitor the devices monitoring me.
privacy  security  netnarr 
february 2018 by cogdog
I made my house smart. It was terrible and I think @trevortimm kind of wanted to divorce me
security  privacy  ioT  smartHome 
february 2018 by Jswindle
Case study of a reporter setting up their own home with a dozen-ish smart devices and watching what data they collected + phoned home.
technology  privacy  internet-of-things 
february 2018 by gunsch
In December, I converted my one-bedroom apartment in San Francisco into a “smart home.” I connected as many of my appliances and belongings as I could to the internet: an Amazon Echo, my lights, my coffee maker, my baby monitor, my kid’s toys, my vacuum, my TV, my toothbrush, a photo frame, a sex toy, and even my bed.
privacy  internetofthings 
february 2018 by jeffhammond
Kashmir In December, I converted my one-bedroom apartment in San Francisco into a “smart home.” I connected as many of my appliances and belongings as I could…
from instapaper
february 2018 by divigation
Kashmir In December, I converted my one-bedroom apartment in San Francisco into a “smart home.” I connected as many of my appliances and belongings as I could…
from instapaper
february 2018 by joeybaker
Kashmir In December, I converted my one-bedroom apartment in San Francisco into a “smart home.” I connected as many of my appliances and belongings as I could…
from instapaper
february 2018 by mauty
RT : I made my house smart. It was terrible and I think kind of wanted to divorce me
from twitter
february 2018 by mcguinness
RT : If you want to see the Internet of Shit house of horrors, beat me to it
from twitter
february 2018 by Cabble
The House That Spied on Me - how much data are you giving away in your smart home? https://t.co/Xz8pH7ikVE
via:packrati.us 
february 2018 by bytebot
Kashmir
In December, I converted my one-bedroom apartment in San Francisco into a “smart home.” I connected as many of my appliances and belongings as I could to the internet: an Amazon Echo, my lights, my coffee maker, my baby monitor, my kid’s toys, my vacuum, my TV, my toothbrush, a photo frame, a sex toy, and even my bed.
“Our bed?” asked my husband, aghast. “What can it tell us?”
“Our breathing rate, heart rate, how often we toss and turn, and then it will give us a sleep report each morning,” I explained.
“Sounds creepy,” he said, as he plopped down on that bed, not bothered enough to relax instead on our non-internet-connected couch.
I soon discovered that the only thing worse than getting a bad night’s sleep is to subsequently get a report from my bed telling me I got a low score and “missed my sleep goal.” Thanks, smart bed, but I know that already. I feel like shit.
security  privacy  smart_home  spying 
february 2018 by rgl7194
Food for thought. Not good.
IoT  privacy 
february 2018 by traggett
This is a great article on the everyday unpleasantness of living in a "smart" home:
from twitter_favs
february 2018 by eh
Kashmir In December, I converted my one-bedroom apartment in San Francisco into a “smart home.” I connected as many of my appliances and belongings as I could…
TechScene  Column 
february 2018 by jayhoffmann
I thought the house would take care of me but instead everything in it now had the power to ask me to do things. Ultimately, I’m not going to warn you against making everything in your home smart because of the privacy risks, although there are quite a few. I’m going to warn you against a smart home because living in it is annoying as hell.
privacy 
february 2018 by W6AZ
Kashmir In December, I converted my one-bedroom apartment in San Francisco into a “smart home.” I connected as many of my appliances and belongings as I could…
from instapaper
february 2018 by indirect
“The House That Spied on Me”
from twitter
february 2018 by vonhaller
The House That Spied on Me
from twitter
february 2018 by cierniak