Abilene paradox - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


20 bookmarks. First posted by dunstan may 2012.


In the Abilene paradox, a group of people collectively decide on a course of action that is counter to the preferences of many or all of the individuals in the group.[1][2] It involves a common breakdown of group communication in which each member mistakenly believes that their own preferences are counter to the group's and, therefore, does not raise objections. A common phrase relating to the Abilene Paradox is a desire not to "rock the boat". This differs from groupthink in that the Abilene paradox is characterized by an inability to manage agreement.[3]
interesting  psychology  communication  conversation  relationships 
5 days ago by ramitsethi
If my team at work were a Culture ship they would be Gradients of Agreement, or possibly Abilene Paradox.
from twitter_favs
11 days ago by daisyk
In the Abilene paradox , a group of people collectively decide on a course of action that is counter to the preferences of many (or all) of the individuals in…
from instapaper
july 2017 by femmebot
For all our faults, remember that the EU is The Abilene Paradox operating at a national level:
from twitter_favs
july 2017 by rich_w
[[On a hot afternoon visiting in Coleman, Texas, the family is comfortably playing dominoes on a porch, until the father-in-law suggests that they take a trip to Abilene [53 miles north] for dinner. The wife says, "Sounds like a great idea." The husband, despite having reservations because the drive is long and hot, thinks that his preferences must be out-of-step with the group and says, "Sounds good to me. I just hope your mother wants to go." The mother-in-law then says, "Of course I want to go. I haven't been to Abilene in a long time."
The drive is hot, dusty, and long. When they arrive at the cafeteria, the food is as bad as the drive. They arrive back home four hours later, exhausted.
One of them dishonestly says, "It was a great trip, wasn't it?" The mother-in-law says that, actually, she would rather have stayed home, but went along since the other three were so enthusiastic. The husband says, "I wasn't delighted to be doing what we were doing. I only went to satisfy the rest of you." The wife says, "I just went along to keep you happy. I would have had to be crazy to want to go out in the heat like that." The father-in-law then says that he only suggested it because he thought the others might be bored.
The group sits back, perplexed that they together decided to take a trip which none of them wanted. They each would have preferred to sit comfortably, but did not admit to it when they still had time to enjoy the afternoon.]]
conformity  management  paradox 
september 2016 by dandv
The term was introduced by management expert Jerry B. Harvey in his 1974 article "The Abilene Paradox: The Management of Agreement."[3] The name of the phenomenon comes from an anecdote in the article which Harvey uses to elucidate the paradox
Management 
april 2016 by dremillard
In an Abilene paradox a group of people collectively decide on a course of action that is counter to the preferences of many (or all) of the individuals in the group.[1][2] It involves a common breakdown of group communication in which each member mistakenly believes that their own preferences are counter to the group's and, therefore, does not raise objections. A common phrase relating to the Abilene Paradox is a desire not to "rock the boat." This differs from groupthink in that the Abilene paradox is characterized by an inability to manage agreement.[3]
groupthink  committee 
july 2015 by hellsten
RT : Trick I learned today: "wait a sec, stop the meeting, do we really want to go to Abilene?"
from twitter
january 2015 by ebel
Trick I learned today: "wait a sec, stop the meeting, do we really want to go to Abilene?"
from twitter
january 2015 by hypatia
The Abilene paradox explains so much... #fb
tweetit  groupthink  management  fb 
january 2015 by pigsonthewing
This explains why enterprise software exists and why so much of it sucks.
management  groupthink  preferences 
november 2014 by tommorris
A paradox where a group decides to do something that no one wants to do
management 
july 2014 by mzyk83
In an Abilene paradox a group of people collectively decide on a course of action that is counter to the preferences of many of the individuals in the group.[1][2] It involves a common breakdown of group communication in which each member mistakenly believes that their own preferences are counter to the group's and, therefore, does not raise objections. A common phrase relating to the Abilene paradox is a desire to not "rock the boat".
Wikipedia 
march 2014 by rchrd_h
The Abilene paradox is a pain in the ass. Watch out for it.
from twitter
may 2012 by dunstan