What I Learned from Watching My iPad’s Slow Death - The New York Times


39 bookmarks. First posted by drewcaldwell february 2018.


Illustration by Jon Han My old iPad just turned five, and it’s starting to die. If it could wonder about such things, it might question this prognosis. Its…
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april 2018 by michaelfox
What I Learned from Watching My iPad’s Slow Death via Instapaper https://ift.tt/2BEX7jD
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april 2018 by TypingPixels
What I Learned from Watching My iPad’s Slow Death My iPad 2s are only still functional beca…
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march 2018 by fjordaan
"Fifteen years ago, before I would replace a desktop computer or a laptop, it would have quite conspicuously broken down, its fans getting louder, its spinning hard drive grinding to a halt. When I would replace it with something newer or faster or more capable, it would enter a promising second life: it could be repurposed as a spare, a computer for a friend, a terminal for playing old games or for doing undistracted work. It could be given to someone who could make use of it.

As I did when I first got it, I still use my old iPad for passive consumption: reading, watching videos, checking feeds. My routine has barely changed, but one by one, formerly easy tasks have become strained. Social apps have become slow, videos take longer to load and Safari can’t seem to handle the most important and fundamental services of the modern web.

As my iPad has aged, I’ve started to notice it more, not because I’m growing fonder, but because I’m getting frustrated: by the fact that it won’t do what it ought to or even what it used to. But what I find most frustrating of all is the gradual disappearance of all options other than buying a new iPad. I understand the reasons for this. I understand the concept of “planned obsolescence” less as a conspiracy than as the unfortunate but universal prerogative of dominant, profit-driven companies that make their money from selling hardware."
2018  johnherrmanipad  plannedobsolescence  technology  patina  obsolescence 
february 2018 by robertogreco
"What I Learned from Watching My iPad’s Slow Death"
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february 2018 by peterjblack
It isn’t worn in; in fact, it has acquired no physical character at all. In many ways, it’s the exact opposite of a baseball mitt in its resistance to sentiment and nostalgia. It exists in memory, barely, as a sort of rectangular green screen, disappearing completely until I remember that it had to have been there. It has been present for the entirety of my relationship with my wife but holds no special significance to us. It has been handled by every member of my immediate family, not all of whom are still alive, but I couldn’t tell you what any of them did with it. The device seems to repel whatever personal experiences it is exposed to; it has a coating on its screen that resists fingerprints.

It was a tool for consumption, sure, but it was also a consumable. Early criticism of the device, which was minor and muffled by enormous sales, focused on the few things that made it noticeable, like its weight or the size of the black border around its screen. (The iPad Mini was an answer to both complaints.) It was, in contrast to the iPhone from which it descended, understood by its users as simply good enough — not life-changing, but handy. It was to be used until its users started noticing it, at which point it was to be replaced. It was, like the iPhone, immune to attachment. But unlike the iPhones, which might be reclaimed by a cellular carrier as part of a scheduled trade-in or just shoved aside by a two-year upgrade, iPads tend to linger. They have time to reveal their tragic thingness.
technology  obsolescence  time 
february 2018 by madamim
My old iPad just turned five, and it’s starting to die. If it could wonder about such things, it might question this prognosis. Its memory, after all, still retrieves information as quickly as it ever did. via Pocket
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february 2018 by driptray
Illustration by Jon Han My old iPad just turned five, and it’s starting to die. If it could wonder about such things, it might question this prognosis. Its…
from instapaper
february 2018 by hybridsolidr
What I Learned from Watching My iPad’s Slow Death

http://ift.tt/2BEX7jD
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february 2018 by poploser
Illustration by Jon Han My old iPad just turned five, and it’s starting to die. If it could wonder about such things, it might question this prognosis. Its…
from instapaper
february 2018 by kohlmannj
Transcendent tech writing is hard to find. This piece is really something
from twitter_favs
february 2018 by lurrel
Illustration by Jon Han My old iPad just turned five, and it’s starting to die. If it could wonder about such things, it might question this prognosis. Its…
from instapaper
february 2018 by yudha87
Illustration by Jon Han My old iPad just turned five, and it’s starting to die. If it could wonder about such things, it might question this prognosis. Its…
from instapaper
february 2018 by davegullett
My old iPad just turned five, and it’s starting to die. If it could wonder about such things, it might question this prognosis. Its memory, after all, still retrieves information as quickly as it ever did. via Pocket
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february 2018 by domingogallardo
Nothing reveals the curious disposability of consumer technology more than this feeble, aging device.
apple 
february 2018 by jacobraleigh
What I learned from watching my iPad's slow death https://t.co/yMPkiBGf35 (https://t.co/a90SsxCI2Z)
from instapaper
february 2018 by joeybaker
Illustration by Jon Han My old iPad just turned five, and it’s starting to die. If it could wonder about such things, it might question this prognosis. Its…
from instapaper
february 2018 by thecosas
RT : it's apple day! here's a review of the way in which my 2012 ipad is dying
from twitter
february 2018 by perich
My old iPad just turned five, and it’s starting to die. If it could wonder about such things, it might question this prognosis. Its memory, after all, still retrieves information as quickly as it ever did. via Pocket
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february 2018 by drewcaldwell