Web Content Accessibility Guidelines—for People Who Haven't Read Them ◆ 24 ways


61 bookmarks. First posted by benjystanton december 2017.


A very user-friendly summary of the main points in WCAG 2.0. Well-structured.
wcag  accessibility  citizensonline  useful 
9 weeks ago by oddhack
Easy-to-understand guidelines for web accessiblity.
web-a11y 
january 2018 by jonathansick
Alan Dalton takes a detailed look at WCAG on this UN International Day of Persons with Disabilities. Remember, Christmas is a time of good will to all, no matter if you have difficulty seeing, hearing, reading, or just have a very shiny nose. Brought to you by The CSS Layout Workshop. Does developing layouts with CSS seem like hard work? How much time could you save without all the trial and error? Are you ready to really learn CSS layout? I’ve been a huge fan of the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 2.0 since the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) published them, nine years ago. I’ve found them practical and future-proof, and I’ve found that they can save a huge amount of time for designers and developers. You can apply them to anything that you can open in a browser. My favourite part is when I use the guidelines to make a website accessible, and then attend user-testing and see someone with a disability easily using that website. Today, the United Nations International Day of Persons with Disabilities, seems like a good time to re-read Laura Kalbag’s explanation of why we should bother with accessibility. That should motivate you to devour this article. If you haven’t read the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 2.0, you might find them a bit off-putting at first. The editors needed to create a single standard that countries around the world could refer to in legislation, and so some of the language in the guidelines reads like legalese. The editors also needed to future-proof the guidelines, and so some terminology—such as “time-based media” and “programmatically determined”—can sound ambiguous. The guidelines can seem lengthy, too: printing the guidelines, the Understanding WCAG 2.0 document, and the Techniques for WCAG 2.0 document would take 1,200 printed pages. This festive season, let’s rip off that legalese and ambiguous terminology like wrapping paper, and see—in a single article—what gifts the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 2.0 editors have bestowed upon us. Can your users perceive the information on your website? The first guideline has criteria that help you prevent your users from asking “What the **** is this thing here supposed to be?” 1.1.1 Text is the most accessible format for information. Screen readers—such as the “VoiceOver” setting on your iPhone or the “TalkBack” app on your Android phone—understand text better than any other format. The same applies for other assistive technology, such as translation apps and Br
from instapaper
january 2018 by dennisreimann
about the WCAG 2.0 guidelines in understandable language
webdesign  web  design  accessible  accessibility 
january 2018 by piperh
A good summary of the web accessibility guidelines.
guidelines  bestpractices  accessibility  webdev 
december 2017 by angusm
Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG)—for People Who Haven't Read Them
from twitter_favs
december 2017 by matthillco
Alan Dalton takes a detailed look at WCAG on this UN International Day of Persons with Disabilities. Remember, Christmas is a time of good will to all, no matter if you have difficulty seeing, hearing, reading, or just have a very shiny nose.
accessibility  webdesign 
december 2017 by barbarian_geek
RT : In , I wrote, “Don’t aim for [a time when your website becomes perfectly accessible for eve…
from twitter
december 2017 by adrianh
Alan Dalton takes a detailed look at WCAG on this UN International Day of Persons with Disabilities. Remember, Christmas is a time of good will to all, no matter if you have difficulty seeing, hearing, reading, or just have a very shiny nose.


refrr:https://24ways.org/
Alan Dalton takes a detailed look at WCAG on this UN International Day of Persons with Disabilities. Remember, Christmas is a time of good will to all, no matter if you have difficulty seeing, hearing, reading, or just have a very shiny nose.


refrr:https://24ways.org/
webdesign  accessibility  bestpractices  styleguide  html  css  design  ui  ux  reference  standard 
december 2017 by michaelfox
Web Content Accessibility Guidelines—for People Who Haven't Read Them
from twitter
december 2017 by codepo8
Web Content Accessibility Guidelines—for People Who Haven't Read Them via Instapaper http://ift.tt/2kiMWtp
IFTTT  Instapaper 
december 2017 by bishbashbosh
WCAG accessibility guidelines in plain English!
from twitter
december 2017 by wyattdanger
I’ve been a huge fan of the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 2.0 since the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) published them, nine years ago. I’ve found them…
accessibility 
december 2017 by studiomohawk
Day 3: Web Content Accessibility Guidelines—for People Who Haven't Read Them by Alan Dalton @realalandalton
december 2017 by wesleythill
Alan Dalton takes a detailed look at WCAG on this UN International Day of Persons with Disabilities.
accessibility  webdesign  webdevelopment  wcag  equality 
december 2017 by garrettc
I’ve been a huge fan of the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 2.0 since the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) published them, nine years ago. I’ve found them…
from instapaper
december 2017 by supinum
RT : Day 3: Web Content Accessibility Guidelines—for People Who Haven't Read Them by Alan Dalton
from twitter
december 2017 by garrett
Day 3: Web Content Accessibility Guidelines—for People Who Haven't Read Them by Alan Dalton
from twitter_favs
december 2017 by benjystanton