Sean Parker unloads on Facebook "exploiting" human weakness


53 bookmarks. First posted by mathewi 9 days ago.


"The thought process that went into building these applications, Facebook being the first of them, ... was all about: 'How do we consume as much of your time and conscious attention as possible?'"
"And that means that we need to sort of give you a little dopamine hit every once in a while, because someone liked or commented on a photo or a post or whatever. And that's going to get you to contribute more content, and that's going to get you ... more likes and comments."
"It's a social-validation feedback loop ... exactly the kind of thing that a hacker like myself would come up with, because you're exploiting a vulnerability in human psychology."
"The inventors, creators — it's me, it's Mark [Zuckerberg], it's Kevin Systrom on Instagram, it's all of these people — understood this consciously. And we did it anyway."
technology  socialmedia 
5 days ago by micah.dennis
'How do we consume as much of your time and conscious attention as possible?' – Facebook co-founder
from twitter
5 days ago by fjordaan
"It's a social-validation feedback loop ... exactly the kind of thing that a hacker like myself would come up with, because you're exploiting a vulnerability in human psychology."
"The inventors, creators — it's me, it's Mark [Zuckerberg], it's Kevin Systrom on Instagram, it's all of these people — understood this consciously. And we did it anyway."
ergh  fb 
6 days ago by libbymiller
“God only knows what it's doing to our children's brains," the founding president of Facebook told Axios on Wednesday.
social-media  addiction 
8 days ago by nathanen
[Sean Parker](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sean_Parker) was the first President of Facebook and was there for the origin. He's now become a "conscientious objector" to social media.

> "The thought process that went into building these applications, Facebook being the first of them, ... was all about: 'How do we consume as much of your time and conscious attention as possible?'"

When I see things like this I wonder how different is this than the tobacco industry? Tobacco is naturally addicting, but social media was designed to be addicting knowing the feedback cycles of the brain. In one case the companies got lucky with tobacco, in another Facebook designed a product with every intent to create addiction. Is there a big difference? Which is worse?

It’s also notable how many tech leaders and innovators have turned off social media over recent years. Many have opted out entirely, others have clearly determined it a PR channel that they use for a specific objective.
8 days ago by thingles
Sean Parker wirft Facebook vor, nicht gut für die Gesundheit von Kindern zu sein. Und überhaupt!
from twitter
8 days ago by grzbielok
Sean Parker unloads on Facebook "exploiting" human psychology
facebook  Psychology  bias 
8 days ago by jorgebarba
The "stranger danger" bias Why it is important to trust people you don't know.
from instapaper
8 days ago by mattl
"[G]ive us billionaires an extra hundred years and you'll know what ... wealth disparity looks like."
facebook 
8 days ago by snitzr
“... you're exploiting a vulnerability in human psychology."
from twitter
8 days ago by e_j
The "stranger danger" bias Why it is important to trust people you don't know.
from instapaper
8 days ago by jrdodds
And that means that we need to sort of give you a little dopamine hit every once in a while, because someone liked or commented on a photo or a post or whatever. And that's going to get you to contribute more content, and that's going to get you ... more likes and comments
scale 
8 days ago by toddhoff
The "stranger danger" bias Why it is important to trust people you don't know.
from instapaper
8 days ago by louderthan10
“God only knows what it's doing to our children's brains," the founding president of Facebook told Axios on Wednesday.
psychology  socialnetwork  productivity  culture 
8 days ago by basemaly
Sean Parker, the founding president of Facebook, gave me a candid insider's look at how social networks purposely hook and potentially hurt our brains. via Pocket
IFTTT  Pocket  ToReadWithPocket 
8 days ago by aksie
By the time he left the stage, he jokingly said Mark Zuckerberg will probably block his account after reading this: "When Facebook was getting going, I had these people who would come up to me and they would say, 'I'm not on social media.' And I would say, 'OK. You know, you will be.' And then they would say, 'No, no, no. I value my real-life interactions. I value the moment. I value presence. I value intimacy.' And I would say, ... 'We'll get you eventually.'" "I don't know if I really understood the consequences of what I was saying, because [of] the unintended consequences of a network when it grows to a billion or 2 billion people and ... it literally changes your relationship with society, with each other ... It probably interferes with productivity in weird ways. God only knows what it's doing to our children's brains."
dd 
8 days ago by motiveunknown
Sean Parker says social media networks like Facebook exploit a vulnerability in human psychology and wonders about effects on productivity and children
9 days ago by joeo10
"And that means that we need to sort of give you a little dopamine hit every once in a while, because someone liked or commented on a photo or a post or whatever. And that's going to get you to contribute more content, and that's going to get you ... more likes and comments."
twig  640 
9 days ago by leolaporte
The "stranger danger" bias Why it is important to trust people you don't know.
Instapaper 
9 days ago by edmadrid
Sean Parker unloads on Facebook: “God only knows what it's doing to our children's brains”
from twitter
9 days ago by adam_albrecht
RT : Wow: Sean Parker, former president of Facebook, tells Mark Zuckerberg, others knowingly hooked/harmed minds
from twitter
9 days ago by colinyoung
Sean Parker on what he helped to create at Facebook: a machine to suck away our attention
from twitter
9 days ago by sgerstenzang
Former FACEBOOK President Unloads on Social Network... http://ift.tt/2zvwwSc

On the western edge of Tiananmen Square, President Xi formally welcomed President Trump to Beijing with a massive welcome ceremony at the Great Hall of the People:

Presidents Trump and Xi walk outside Beijing's Great Hall of the People during a welcome ceremony. Photo: Andrew Harnik / AP

Another view of the crowds outside of the welcome ceremony. Photo: Andrew Harnik / AP

The delegations then entered the building to take part in bilateral meetings:

Presidents Trump and Xi face each other — along with their delegations — at a bilateral meeting. Photo: Andrew Harnik / AP

Presidents Trump and Xi then talked business between the United States and China at a public event:

President Xi introduces President Trump at a U.S.-China business event. Photo: Andrew Harnik / AP

Presidents Trump and Xi then took part in a joint press conference, which notably did not feature any questions from the press — a rollback from changes instituted under the Obama administration during events in China

Presidents Trump and Xi shake hands following their joint statements to the press. Photo: Andy Wong / AP

Meanwhile, First Lady Melania Trump headed to a Beijing primary school with Chinese First Lady Peng Liyuan to view classes and greet schoolchildren:

First Ladies Melania Trump and Peng Liyuan at an event at Beijing's Banchang Primary School. Photo: Greg Baker / Pool via AP

Trump then met with Chinese Premier Li Keqiang, continuing his visits with top Chinese officials:

President Trump and Premier Li pose for photos outside of their meeting; Photo: Andrew Harnik / AP

Presidents Trump and Xi and their wives then took a short break before reconvening for a state dinner:

Presidents Trump and Xi chat as they enter a state dinner. Photo: Andrew Harnik / AP

A group of President Trump's top staffers before the state dinner. Photo: Sarah Sanders / Twitter

http://ift.tt/1dkNe89
IFTTT  Feedly 
9 days ago by Buffalo_Goku
The "stranger danger" bias Why it is important to trust people you don't know.
from instapaper
9 days ago by mathewi