Looking for Life on a Flat Earth | The New Yorker


86 bookmarks. First posted by farley13 20 days ago.


it's hard to believe this is real, but...
science  truth 
yesterday by cwinters
Illustration by Robert Beatty On the last Sunday afternoon in March, Mike Hughes, a sixty-two-year-old limousine driver from Apple Valley, California,…
from instapaper
2 days ago by aburgel
Alan Burdick's fascinating profile of "the mother of all conspiracies," in the New Yorker: "The flat Earth was perhaps a scam, an emotional salve with no basis in physical reality. Now it has become both real and surreal, like a performance-art piece in which nobody can tell the actors, stagehands, and audience apart."
newyorker  conspiracy  truth  science 
4 days ago by warnick
What a burgeoning movement says about science, solace, and how a theory becomes truth.
On the last Sunday afternoon in March, Mike Hughes, a sixty-two-year-old limousine driver from Apple Valley, California, successfully launched himself above the Mojave Desert in a homemade steam-powered rocket. He’d been trying for years, in one way or another. In 2002, Hughes set a Guinness World Record for the longest ramp jump—a hundred and three feet—in a limo, a stretch Lincoln Town Car. In 2014, he allegedly flew thirteen hundred and seventy-four feet in a garage-built rocket and was injured when it crashed. He planned to try again in 2016, but his Kickstarter campaign, which aimed to raise a hundred and fifty thousand dollars, netted just two supporters and three hundred and ten dollars. Further attempts were scrubbed—mechanical problems, logistical hurdles, hassles from the U.S. Bureau of Land Management. Finally, a couple of months ago, he made good. Stuff was leaking, bolts needed tightening, but at around three o’clock, and with no countdown, Hughes blasted off from a portable ramp—attached to a motorhome he’d bought through Craigslist—soared to nearly nineteen hundred feet, and, after a minute or so, parachuted less than gently back to Earth.
science  history  fake_news  conspiracy  religion  earth  space 
5 days ago by rgl7194
On the last Sunday afternoon in March, Mike Hughes, a sixty-two-year-old limousine driver from Apple Valley, California, successfully launched himself above the Mojave Desert in a homemade steam-powered rocket. He’d been trying for years, in one way or another.
Archive  instapaper  tenpla 
6 days ago by WFreeland
On the last Sunday afternoon in March, Mike Hughes, a sixty-two-year-old limousine driver from Apple Valley, California, successfully launched himself above the Mojave Desert in a homemade steam-powered rocket. He’d been trying for years, in one way or another. In 2002, Hughes set a Guinness World Record for the longest ramp jump—a hundred and three feet—in a limo, a stretch Lincoln Town Car. In 2014, he allegedly flew thirteen hundred and seventy-four feet in a garage-built rocket and was injured when it crashed. He planned to try again in 2016, but his Kickstarter campaign, which aimed to raise a hundred and fifty thousand dollars, netted just two supporters and three hundred and ten dollars. Further attempts were scrubbed—mechanical problems, logistical hurdles, hassles from the U.S. Bureau of Land Management. Finally, a couple of months ago, he made good. Stuff was leaking, bolts needed tightening, but at around three o’clock, and with no countdown, Hughes blasted off from a portable ramp—attached to a motorhome he’d bought through Craigslist—soared to nearly nineteen hundred feet, and, after a minute or so, parachuted less than gently back to Earth.
article  psychology 
6 days ago by lukasz
Illustration by Robert Beatty On the last Sunday afternoon in March, Mike Hughes, a sixty-two-year-old limousine driver from Apple Valley, California,…
from instapaper
6 days ago by mattl
>Gravity, too, is just another theory; flat-Earthers believe that objects simply fall. (“ ‘Gravity,’ they love that one,” Marble said, using air quotes. “Grabbity—with two ‘B’s.”)
How can you not believe in gravity? It's successfully explained some many phenomena. The mind reels.
h/t [Gruber](https://daringfireball.net/linked/2018/06/11/flat-earther-derpers) @gruber
blogged 
7 days ago by ReadingGeorgeFox
Looking for Life on a Flat Earth
from twitter_favs
7 days ago by briantrice
Looking for Life on a Flat Earth

Illustration by Robert Beatty On the last Sunday afternoon in March, Mike Hughes, a sixty-two-year-old limousine driver from Apple Valley, California,…
Instapaper  from instapaper
7 days ago by poploser
Looking for Life on a Flat Earth https://t.co/DJ0nQvIXqB

— Greg (@modern_ema) June 12, 2018
IFTTT  Twitter 
7 days ago by greihing
Alan Burdick writes about a growing community of people who reject the notion that the Earth is round.
science 
7 days ago by hisaac
Illustration by Robert Beatty On the last Sunday afternoon in March, Mike Hughes, a sixty-two-year-old limousine driver from Apple Valley, California,…
from instapaper
7 days ago by dannystewart
On the last Sunday afternoon in March, Mike Hughes, a sixty-two-year-old limousine driver from Apple Valley, California, successfully launched himself above the Mojave Desert in a homemade steam-powered rocket. He’d been trying for years, in one way or another. via Pocket
IFTTT  Pocket  feedly 
7 days ago by schmitz
Illustration by Robert Beatty On the last Sunday afternoon in March, Mike Hughes, a sixty-two-year-old limousine driver from Apple Valley, California,…
from instapaper
7 days ago by svs
Illustration by Robert Beatty On the last Sunday afternoon in March, Mike Hughes, a sixty-two-year-old limousine driver from Apple Valley, California,…
from instapaper
7 days ago by timwburch
I’m at a lack for words. →
from twitter
7 days ago by AlexK
via Starred items from BazQux Reader https://ift.tt/1cAKc9M and IFTTT
Starred  items  from  BazQux  Reader 
8 days ago by stinkingpig
Illustration by Robert Beatty On the last Sunday afternoon in March, Mike Hughes, a sixty-two-year-old limousine driver from Apple Valley, California,…
from instapaper
8 days ago by disnet
Inside the Growing Flat Earth Movement – Feedbin Starred Entries for toph.allen@gmail.com
Feedbin 
8 days ago by toph
flat earth conference, lots of conspiracy theories, manat the centre of the universe
flat  earth  science  flat_earth  truth  lies  conspiricy  conspiracy  2018  creationism  facts 
8 days ago by danfnz
- Gruber: In recent years I’ve begun to feel conflicted about the internet. On the one hand, it’s been wonderful in so many ways. I’ve personally built my entire career on the fact that the internet enables me to publish as a one-person operation. But on the other hand, before the internet, kooks were forced to exist on the fringe. There’ve always been flat-earther-types denying science and John Birch Society political fringers, but they had no means to amplify their message or bond into large movements.
IFTTT  Facebook 
8 days ago by shaunkoh
Illustration by Robert Beatty On the last Sunday afternoon in March, Mike Hughes, a sixty-two-year-old limousine driver from Apple Valley, California,…
from instapaper
8 days ago by Shurs
Illustration by Robert Beatty On the last Sunday afternoon in March, Mike Hughes, a sixty-two-year-old limousine driver from Apple Valley, California,…
from instapaper
8 days ago by mccutchen
Alan Burdick, writing for The New Yorker:

The unsettling thing about spending two days at a convention of people who believe that Earth is flat isn’t the possibility that you, too, might come to accept their world view, although I did worry a little about that. Rather, it’s the very real likelihood that, after sitting through hours of presentations on “scientism,” lightning angels, and nasa’s many conspiracies — the moon-landing hoax, the International Fake Station, so-called satellites — and in chatting with I.T. specialists, cops, college students, and fashionably dressed families with young children, all of them unfailingly earnest and lovely, you will come to actually understand why a growing number of people are dead certain that Earth is flat. Because that truth is unnerving.

 ★ 
via:daringfireball 
8 days ago by rufous
from Daring Fireball

Alan Burdick, writing for The New Yorker:

The unsettling thing about spending two days at a convention of people who believe that Earth is flat isn’t the possibility that you, too, might come to accept their world view, although I did worry a little about that. Rather, it’s the very real likelihood that, after sitting through hours of presentations on “scientism,” lightning angels, and nasa’s many conspiracies — the moon-landing hoax, the International Fake Station, so-called satellites — and in chatting with I.T. specialists, cops, college students, and fashionably dressed families with young children, all of them unfailingly earnest and lovely, you will come to actually understand why a growing number of people are dead certain that Earth is flat. Because that truth is unnerving.

 ★ 
ifttt  daringfireball 
8 days ago by josephschmitt
Illustration by Robert Beatty On the last Sunday afternoon in March, Mike Hughes, a sixty-two-year-old limousine driver from Apple Valley, California,…
from instapaper
11 days ago by granth
Illustration by Robert Beatty On the last Sunday afternoon in March, Mike Hughes, a sixty-two-year-old limousine driver from Apple Valley, California,…
from instapaper
13 days ago by afortin
I continue to find this community and reporting on it fascinating.
via:feedbin  conspiracy  flatearth  science  culture 
13 days ago by npdoty
Earth really is flat. We know this because dozens, if not hundreds, of YouTube videos describe the coverup.
from twitter
16 days ago by unclespeedo
On the last Sunday afternoon in March, Mike Hughes, a sixty-two-year-old limousine driver from Apple Valley, California, successfully launched himself above the…
from instapaper
17 days ago by dylan
Flat Earth Conference
misinformation 
17 days ago by danbri
i had to stop reading this for fear my brain might bleed out of my ears
from twitter_favs
17 days ago by misc
Illustration by Robert Beatty On the last Sunday afternoon in March, Mike Hughes, a sixty-two-year-old limousine driver from Apple Valley, California,…
from instapaper
17 days ago by kohlmannj
The reward is existential solace. This, I came to understand, was the real draw, the thing that could make, say, an unemployed clerical worker drive twelve hours, alone, from Michigan to Raleigh. To believe in a flat Earth is to belong not only to a human community but to sit, once again, at the center of the cosmos. The standard facts of astronomy are emotionally untenable—a planet spinning at a thousand miles per hour, a mote in a galaxy of unimaginable scale, itself a mote in the vast and expanding universe. “That, to me, is a huge problem,” Campanella said. “You are a created individual. This is a created place. It’s not an accident; it’s not an explosion in space; it’s not random molecules joining together.”
flat-earthers 
17 days ago by jbpin
Alan Burdick:
<p>If we can agree on anything anymore, it’s that we live in a post-truth era. Facts are no longer correct or incorrect; everything is potentially true unless it’s disagreeable, in which case it’s fake. Recently, Lesley Stahl, of “60 Minutes,” revealed that, in an interview after the 2016 election, Donald Trump told her that the reason he maligns the press is “to discredit you all and demean you all so that when you write negative stories about me no one will believe you.” Or, as George Costanza put it, coming from the opposite direction, “It’s not a lie if you believe it.”

The flat Earth is the post-truth landscape. As a group, its residents view themselves as staunch empiricists, their eyes wide open. The plane truth, they say, can be grasped in experiments that anyone can do at home. For instance, approach a large body of water and hold up a ruler to the horizon: it’s flat all the way across. What pond, lake, or sea have you ever seen where the surface of its waters curves? Another argument holds that, if Earth were truly spherical, an airplane flying above it would need to constantly adjust its nose downward to avoid flying straight into space. If, say, you flew on a plane and put a spirit level—one of those levels that you buy at the hardware store, with a capsule of liquid and an air bubble in the middle—on your tray table, the level should reveal a slight downward inclination. But it doesn’t: the level is level, the flight is level, the nose of the plane is level, and therefore the surface of Earth must be level. Marble performed this experiment himself, recorded it, posted it on YouTube, and a co-worker started a Reddit thread that linked to it. Soon Marble had twenty-two thousand followers and a nickname, the Spirit-Level Guy.

“We’re not trying to express any degree of intellectual superiority,” he said at the conference. “I’m just trying to wake people up to the idea that they’ve been lied to. It’s what you would do with any friend.”</p>

It's hard to decide: are we entering a new dark ages, when the populace is stupid and so are the rulers, and intelligent ideas are pushed aside? Or is this just a fringe, with the necessary intelligent work continuing regardless? I side with the "fringe" idea, but the ability of totally stupid, unscientific ideas to persuade people is unsettling.
Flatearth  stupid 
17 days ago by charlesarthur
Illustration by Robert Beatty On the last Sunday afternoon in March, Mike Hughes, a sixty-two-year-old limousine driver from Apple Valley, California,…
from instapaper
18 days ago by yudha87
Illustration by Robert Beatty On the last Sunday afternoon in March, Mike Hughes, a sixty-two-year-old limousine driver from Apple Valley, California,…
from instapaper
18 days ago by mikerugnetta
Illustration by Robert Beatty On the last Sunday afternoon in March, Mike Hughes, a sixty-two-year-old limousine driver from Apple Valley, California,…
from instapaper
18 days ago by ats
Illustration by Robert Beatty On the last Sunday afternoon in March, Mike Hughes, a sixty-two-year-old limousine driver from Apple Valley, California,…
from instapaper
18 days ago by indirect
"YouTube got us into it" (yet again). Conspiracy theory uptake appears to be steadily increasing - this article is about flat earthers - and recommendation…
from instapaper
19 days ago by mathewi
Illustration by Robert Beatty On the last Sunday afternoon in March, Mike Hughes, a sixty-two-year-old limousine driver from Apple Valley, California,…
from instapaper
19 days ago by johnrclark
Illustration by Robert Beatty On the last Sunday afternoon in March, Mike Hughes, a sixty-two-year-old limousine driver from Apple Valley, California,…
from instapaper
19 days ago by lach
Illustration by Robert Beatty On the last Sunday afternoon in March, Mike Hughes, a sixty-two-year-old limousine driver from Apple Valley, California,…
from instapaper
19 days ago by breau
RT : Many things fuel the flat-Earth movement, I learned, including loneliness.
from twitter
19 days ago by jrosenau
Illustration by Robert Beatty On the last Sunday afternoon in March, Mike Hughes, a sixty-two-year-old limousine driver from Apple Valley, California,…
from instapaper
19 days ago by jrdodds
Illustration by Robert Beatty On the last Sunday afternoon in March, Mike Hughes, a sixty-two-year-old limousine driver from Apple Valley, California,…
from instapaper
19 days ago by leftyotter