Once considered a boon to democracy, social media have started to look like its nemesis - Less Euromaidan, more Gamergate


33 bookmarks. First posted by bits 14 days ago.


“COME on guys, let’s be serious. If you really want to do something, don’t just ‘like’ this post. Write that you are ready, and we can try to start something.” Mustafa Nayem, a Ukrainian journalist, typed those words into his Facebook account on the morning of November 21st 2013. via Pocket
IFTTT  Pocket  facebook  twitter 
6 days ago by Werderbach
Must read. Ban provision of services based on advertising?
s 
7 days ago by jgordon
Long detailed piece about society and Internet communication
twitter  politics  china  abuse  democracy  propaganda  facebook 
8 days ago by nelson
“COME on guys, let’s be serious. If you really want to do something, don’t just ‘like’ this post. Write that you are ready, and we can try to start something.” Mustafa Nayem, a Ukrainian journalist, typed those words into his Facebook account on the morning of November 21st 2013. via Pocket
IFTTT  Pocket 
9 days ago by archizoo
“COME on guys, let’s be serious. If you really want to do something, don’t just ‘like’ this post. Write that you are ready, and we can try to start something.” Mustafa Nayem, a Ukrainian journalist, typed those words into his Facebook account on the morning of November 21st 2013. via Pocket
IFTTT  Pocket 
10 days ago by trisignia
”Social media are a mechanism for capturing, manipulating and consuming attention unlike any other. That in itself means that power over those media—be it the power of ownership, of regulation or of clever hacking—is of immense political importance. Regardless of specific agendas, though, it seems to many that the more information people consume through these media, the harder it will become to create a shared, open space for political discussion—or even to imagine that such a place might exist.”
media  web  internet  social 
10 days ago by johans
“COME on guys, let’s be serious. If you really want to do something, don’t just ‘like’ this post. Write that you are ready, and we can try to start something.”…
from instapaper
10 days ago by leftyotter
“COME on guys, let’s be serious. If you really want to do something, don’t just ‘like’ this post. Write that you are ready, and we can try to start something.”…
from instapaper
10 days ago by johnrclark
“COME on guys, let’s be serious. If you really want to do something, don’t just ‘like’ this post. Write that you are ready, and we can try to start something.”…
from instapaper
10 days ago by jrdodds
“Smartphones, the new slot machines in the attention economy”
from twitter_favs
11 days ago by thomwithoutanh
RT : Not the analogy I would have picked but it’ll do
from twitter
11 days ago by jrosenau
“COME on guys, let’s be serious. If you really want to do something, don’t just ‘like’ this post. Write that you are ready, and we can try to start something.”…
from instapaper
12 days ago by alphex
Supposedly, my work popularizing lolcats is the root of and solution to the world's problems.
from twitter_favs
12 days ago by wynlim
When putting these media ecosystems to political purposes, various tools are useful. Humour is one. It spreads well; it also differentiates the in-group from the out-group; how you feel about the humour, especially if it is in questionable taste, binds you to one or the other. The best tool, though, is outrage. This is because it feeds on itself; the outrage of others with whom one feels fellowship encourages one’s own. This shared outrage reinforces the fellow feeling; a lack of appropriate outrage marks you out as not belonging. The reverse is also true. Going into the enemy camp and posting or tweeting things that cause them outrage—trolling, in other words—is a great way of getting attention.
best.2017  attention 
12 days ago by alemacgo
RT : Closed and isolated tech cos have cultivated ignorance of how they work, now face (potentially perverse) regulation
from twitter_favs
13 days ago by mathewi
Years ago Jürgen Habermas, a noted German philosopher, suggested that while the connectivity of social media might destabilise authoritarian countries, it would also erode the public sphere in democracies. James Williams, a doctoral student at Oxford University and a former Google employee, now claims that “digital technologies increasingly inhibit our ability to pursue any politics worth having.” To save democracy, he argues, “we need to reform our attention economy.”

The idea of the attention economy is not new. “What information consumes is rather obvious: it consumes the attention of its recipients,” Herbert Simon, a noted economist, wrote in 1971. A “wealth of information,” he added, “creates a poverty of attention.” In “The Attention Merchants”, published in 2016, Tim Wu of Columbia University explains how 20th-century media companies hoovered up ever more of this scarce resource for sale to advertisers, and how Google and its ilk have continued the process.



Because of the data they collect, social-media companies have a good idea of what sort of things go viral, and how to tweak a message until it does. They are willing to share such insights with clients—including with political campaigns versed in the necessary skills, or willing to buy them. The Leave campaign in Britain’s 2016 Brexit referendum was among the pioneers. It served about 1bn targeted digital advertisements, mostly on Facebook, experimenting with different versions and dropping ineffective ones. The Trump campaign in 2016 did much the same, but on a much larger scale: on an average day it fed Facebook between 50,000 and 60,000 different versions of its advertisements, according to Brad Parscale, its digital director. Some were aimed at just a few dozen voters in a particular district.



The algorithms that Facebook, YouTube and others use to maximise “engagement” ensure users are more likely to see information that they are liable to interact with. This tends to lead them into clusters of like-minded people sharing like-minded things, and can turn moderate views into more extreme ones. “It’s like you start as a vegetarian and end up as a vegan,” says Zeynep Tufekci of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, describing her experience following the recommendations on YouTube.


The best tool, though, is outrage. This is because it feeds on itself; the outrage of others with whom one feels fellowship encourages one’s own.


Going into the enemy camp and posting or tweeting things that cause them outrage—trolling, in other words—is a great way of getting attention.


In 2015 enterprising enemies set up a Twitter bot dedicated to sending him tweets with unattributed quotes from Benito Mussolini, Italy’s fascist dictator. Last year Mr Trump finally retweeted one: “It is better to live one day as a lion than 100 years as a sheep.” Cue Trump-is-a-fascist outrage.
facebook  social-media  democracy  politics  fakenews  doxing 
13 days ago by hellsten
“COME on guys, let’s be serious. If you really want to do something, don’t just ‘like’ this post. Write that you are ready, and we can try to start something.”…
from instapaper
13 days ago by dshack
Once considered a boon to democracy, social media have started to look like its nemesis via Instapaper http://ift.tt/2z6uKGE
IFTTT  Instapaper 
14 days ago by PattiN
Great article on why big social media is such a problem
from twitter
14 days ago by zigg
“COME on guys, let’s be serious. If you really want to do something, don’t just ‘like’ this post. Write that you are ready, and we can try to start something.”…
from instapaper
14 days ago by bits