Apple at Its Best – Stratechery by Ben Thompson


55 bookmarks. First posted by chrisgonyea 15 days ago.


The history of Apple being doomed doesn’t necessarily repeat, but it does rhyme. via Pocket
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21 hours ago by driptray
The history of Apple being doomed doesn’t necessarily repeat, but it does rhyme.
5 days ago by pitiphong_p
The history of Apple being doomed doesn’t necessarily repeat, but it does rhyme.
Take the latest installment, from Professor Mohanbir Sawhney at the Kellogg School of Management (one of my former professors, incidentally):
Have we reached peak phone? That is, does the new iPhone X represent a plateau for hardware innovation in the smartphone product category? I would argue that we are indeed standing on the summit of peak “phone as hardware”: While Apple’s newest iPhone offers some impressive hardware features, it does not represent the beginning of the next 10 years of the smartphone, as Apple claims…
As we have seen, when the vector of differentiation shifts, market leaders tend to fall by the wayside. In the brave new world of AI, Google and Amazon have the clear edge over Apple. Consider Google’s Pixel 2 phone: Driven by AI-based technology, it offers unprecedented photo-enhancement features and deeper hardware-software integration, such as real-time language translation when used with Google’s special headphones…The shifting vector of differentiation to AI and agents does not bode well for Apple…
apple  iphoneX 
6 days ago by rgl7194
The history of Apple being doomed doesn’t necessarily repeat, but it does rhyme. Take the latest installment , from Professor Mohanbir Sawhney at the Kellogg…
from instapaper
12 days ago by fugaz
"Apple’s original competitive advantage — the integration of hardware and software — is more durable than disruption theory would suggest."
apple  iphone  iphoneX  designthinking  userexperience  delighters 
12 days ago by garrettc
The history of Apple being doomed doesn’t necessarily repeat, but it does rhyme. via Pocket
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12 days ago by schmitz
The history of Apple being doomed doesn’t necessarily repeat, but it does rhyme. Take the latest installment , from Professor Mohanbir Sawhney at the Kellogg…
from instapaper
12 days ago by skinnyj
The history of Apple being doomed doesn’t necessarily repeat, but it does rhyme. Take the latest installment , from Professor Mohanbir Sawhney at the Kellogg…
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12 days ago by dannystewart
The history of Apple being doomed doesn’t necessarily repeat, but it does rhyme. Take the latest installment , from Professor Mohanbir Sawhney at the Kellogg…
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13 days ago by kohlmannj
The history of Apple being doomed doesn’t necessarily repeat, but it does rhyme. Take the latest installment , from Professor Mohanbir Sawhney at the Kellogg…
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13 days ago by fogus
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13 days ago by joewiz
The history of Apple being doomed doesn’t necessarily repeat, but it does rhyme. Take the latest installment , from Professor Mohanbir Sawhney at the Kellogg…
from instapaper
13 days ago by breau
from Daring Fireball

Ben Thompson, writing at Stratecher:

In these instances the iPhone X is reaching the very pinnacle of computing: doing a necessary job, in this case security, better than humans can. The fact that this case is security is particularly noteworthy: it has long been taken as a matter of fact that there is an inescapable trade-off between security and ease-of-use; TouchID made it far easier to have effective security for the vast majority of situations, and FaceID makes it invisible.

The trick Apple pulled, though, was going beyond that: the first time I saw notifications be hidden and then revealed (as in the GIF above) through simply a glance produced the sort of surprise-and-delight that has traditionally characterized Apple’s best products. And, to be sure, surprise-and-delight is particularly important to the iPhone X: so much is new, particularly in terms of the interaction model, that frustrations are inevitable; in that Apple’s attempt to analogize the iPhone X to the original iPhone is more about contrasts than comparisons.

“Surprise and delight” are intangibles. You can’t measure them with a benchmark or instrument. There are contingents of hardcore power user and open source nerd types who disdain surprise and delight as product attributes — and no surprise, those are the folks who seem to be dismissing iPhone X as a cash-grab.

 ★ 
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13 days ago by josephschmitt
Ben Thompson, writing at Stratecher:

In these instances the iPhone X is reaching the very pinnacle of computing: doing a necessary job, in this case security, better than humans can. The fact that this case is security is particularly noteworthy: it has long been taken as a matter of fact that there is an inescapable trade-off between security and ease-of-use; TouchID made it far easier to have effective security for the vast majority of situations, and FaceID makes it invisible.

The trick Apple pulled, though, was going beyond that: the first time I saw notifications be hidden and then revealed (as in the GIF above) through simply a glance produced the sort of surprise-and-delight that has traditionally characterized Apple’s best products. And, to be sure, surprise-and-delight is particularly important to the iPhone X: so much is new, particularly in terms of the interaction model, that frustrations are inevitable; in that Apple’s attempt to analogize the iPhone X to the original iPhone is more about contrasts than comparisons.

“Surprise and delight” are intangibles. You can’t measure them with a benchmark or instrument. There are contingents of hardcore power user and open source nerd types who disdain surprise and delight as product attributes — and no surprise, those are the folks who seem to be dismissing iPhone X as a cash-grab.

 ★ 
via:daringfireball 
13 days ago by rufous
iPhone X shows how Apple's integration of hardware and software fends off less integrated rivals, like Google, even when rival services are superior
iphone  apple  Strategy  Innovation 
13 days ago by jorgebarba
I’m not the only one to think this guy has no clue…
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14 days ago by jwbales
via Stratechery by Ben Thompson Member Feed https://stratechery.com
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14 days ago by sbmandal
The history of Apple being doomed doesn’t necessarily repeat, but it does rhyme. Take the latest installment , from Professor Mohanbir Sawhney at the Kellogg…
from instapaper
14 days ago by toph
Apple at Its Best | stratechery ... great piece
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14 days ago by rickc57
Apple at Its Best
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14 days ago by neozhang
The history of Apple being doomed doesn’t necessarily repeat, but it does rhyme. via Pocket
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14 days ago by domingogallardo
The history of Apple being doomed doesn’t necessarily repeat, but it does rhyme. via Pocket
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14 days ago by keithprime
Ben Thompson found himself delighted - that's the word - with the iPhone X, and reflects on where Apple's sustainable advantage exists in the smartphone world of hardware and services:
<p>smartphones are increasingly replacing PCs, but even then most use is additive, not substitutive. In other words, there is no reason to expect that the arrival of artificial intelligence means that people will no longer care about what smartphone they use. Sure, the latter may “recede into the background” in the minds of pundits, but they will still be in consumers’ pockets for a long time to come.

There’s a second error, though, that flows from this presumption of zero-summedness: it ignores the near-term business imperatives of the various parties. Google is the best example: were the company to restrict its services to its own smartphone platform the company would be financially decimated. The most attractive customers to Google’s advertisers are on the iPhone — just look at how much Google is willing to pay to acquire them — and while Google could in theory convince them to switch by keeping its superior services exclusive, in reality such an approach is untenable. In other words, Google is heavily incentivized to preserve the iPhone as a competitive platform in terms of Google’s own services; granted, Android is still better in terms of easy access and defaults, but the advantage is far smaller than it could be.

Apple, meanwhile, is busy building competing services of its own, and while its easy — and correct — to argue that they aren’t really competitive with Google’s, that doesn’t really matter because competition isn’t happening in a vacuum. Rather, Apple not only enjoys the cost of switching advantage inherent to all incumbents, but also is, as the iPhone X shows, maintaining if not extending the user experience advantage that comes from its integrated model. That, by extension, means that Apple’s services need only be “good enough” — there’s that phrase! — to let the company’s other strengths shine.</p>


Worth it for the GIF he includes of unlocking for notifications. For all the (plentiful) moaning about Apple, In the past year, both AirPods and the iPhone X have really delighted people who begin using them expecting "just another" product. The iPhone X, in particular, has had rave reviews from customers.

What's the last product you used that utterly <em>delighted</em> you?
apple  services  hardware 
14 days ago by charlesarthur
Favorite tweet: howardlindzon

A smarter way to wax poetic about why $aapl may just be getting started yet again https://t.co/cNC1xaSMuK

— howardlindzon (@howardlindzon) November 6, 2017

http://twitter.com/howardlindzon/status/927577872629403648
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15 days ago by tswaterman
The history of Apple being doomed doesn’t necessarily repeat, but it does rhyme.
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15 days ago by mud
The history of Apple being doomed doesn’t necessarily repeat, but it does rhyme. Take the latest installment , from Professor Mohanbir Sawhney at the Kellogg…
from instapaper
15 days ago by disnet
The history of Apple being doomed doesn’t necessarily repeat, but it does rhyme. via Pocket
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15 days ago by archizoo
RT : Apple at Its Best

The iPhone X is a reminder that Apple's HW/SW advantage is a durable defense against disruption
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15 days ago by scottw
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15 days ago by stinkingpig
Apple at Its Best

The iPhone X is a reminder that Apple's HW/SW advantage is a durable defense against disruption
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15 days ago by chrisgonyea