China’s Race to Find Aliens First - The Atlantic


85 bookmarks. First posted by dalcrose november 2017.


Last January, the Chinese Academy of Sciences invited Liu Cixin, China’s preeminent science-fiction writer, to visit its new state-of-the-art radio dish in the…
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april 2018 by wenxin
China is investing more in making first contact than anyone else, but fear of conflict means other civilizations aren’t likely to make theirselves known even to such powerful instruments.
china  aliens 
february 2018 by irace
"China has learned the hard way that spectacular scientific achievements confer prestige upon nations. The 'Celestial Kingdom' looked on from the sidelines as Russia flung the first satellite and human being into space, and then again when American astronauts spiked the Stars and Stripes into the lunar crust. China has largely focused on the applied sciences. It built the world’s fastest supercomputer, spent heavily on medical research, and planted a 'great green wall' of forests in its northwest as a last-ditch effort to halt the Gobi Desert’s spread. Now China is bringing its immense resources to bear on the fundamental sciences. The country plans to build an atom smasher that will conjure thousands of 'god particles' out of the ether, in the same time it took cern’s Large Hadron Collider to strain out a handful. It is also eyeing Mars. In the technopoetic idiom of the 21st century, nothing would symbolize China’s rise like a high-definition shot of a Chinese astronaut setting foot on the red planet. Nothing except, perhaps, first contact."
a:Ross-Andersen★  p:The-Atlantic★★  d:2017.12  w:6000  space  China  nuclear-weapons  science  future  history  from instapaper
january 2018 by bankbryan
The Dark Forest was a breathtaking book. - He told me that we are limited in how we think about other civilizations. “Especially those that may last millions or billions of years,” he said. “When we wonder why they don’t use certain technologies to spread across a galaxy, we might be like spiders wondering why humans don’t use webs to catch insects.” And anyway, an older civilization that has achieved internal peace may still behave like a hunter, Liu said, in part because it would grasp the difficulty of “understanding one another across cosmic distances.” And it would know that the stakes of a misunderstanding could be existential.
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january 2018 by shaunkoh
As America has turned away from searching for extraterrestrial intelligence, China has built the world’s largest radio dish for precisely that purpose.
china  space  seti  extraterrestrial  civilization  history  technology 
december 2017 by soobrosa
China's efforts to detect extra-terrestrial radio signals, wrapped around an extended interview with the author of "The Three-Body Problem" trilogy. So fascinating!
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december 2017 by jeremyhiggs
China's Race to Find Aliens First - The Atlantic via
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november 2017 by kctipton
Read this.. it’s great
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november 2017 by parisba
Last January, the Chinese Academy of Sciences invited Liu Cixin, China’s preeminent science-fiction writer, to visit its new state-of-the-art radio dish in the…
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november 2017 by sevas
must-read piece on a topic that may never mean anything -- or may alter the entire world
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november 2017 by dr3wster
must-read piece on a topic that may never mean anything -- or may alter the entire world
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november 2017 by drjoshbrock
What Happens If China Makes First Contact? | Last January, the Chinese Academy of Sciences invited Liu Cixin, China’s preeminent science-fiction writer, to visit its new state-of-the-art radio dish in the… | http://ift.tt/2zsA9u7 | via Instapaper and IFTTT
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november 2017 by habi
Before I left for China, Siemion warned me that the roads around the observatory were difficult to navigate, but he said I’d know I was close when my phone reception went wobbly. Radio transmissions are forbidden near the dish, lest scientists there mistake stray electromagnetic radiation for a signal from the deep. Supercomputers are still sifting through billions of false positives collected during previous seti observations, most caused by human technological interference.
november 2017 by spectrevision

Science fiction is sometimes described as a literature of the future, but historical allegory is one of its dominant modes. Isaac Asimov based his Foundation series on classical Rome, and Frank Herbert’s Dune borrows plot points from the past of the Bedouin Arabs. Liu is reluctant to make connections between his books and the real world, but he did tell me that his work is influenced by the history of Earth’s civilizations, “especially the encounters between more technologically advanced civilizations and the original settlers of a place.” One such encounter occurred during the 19th century, when the “Middle Kingdom” of China, around which all of Asia had once revolved, looked out to sea and saw the ships of Europe’s seafaring empires, whose ensuing invasion triggered a loss in status for China comparable to the fall of Rome.

Every so often, a Hans Zimmer bass note would sound, and the glass pane would fill up with the smooth, spaceship-white side of another train, whooshing by in the opposite direction at almost 200 miles an hour.

seti does share some traits with religion. It is motivated by deep human desires for connection and transcendence. It concerns itself with questions about human origins, about the raw creative power of nature, and about our future in this universe—and it does all this at a time when traditional religions have become unpersuasive to many.

China could rightly regard itself as the lone survivor of the great Bronze Age civilizations, a class that included the Babylonians, the Mycenaeans, and even the ancient Egyptians. Western poets came to regard the latter’s ruins as Ozymandian proof that nothing lasted. But China had lasted. Its emperors presided over the planet’s largest complex social organization. They commanded tribute payments from China’s neighbors, whose rulers sent envoys to Beijing to perform a baroque face-to-the-ground bowing ceremony for the emperors’ pleasure.
astronomy  seti  china  alien  chinese  project  state  scientist  scifi  technology  development  2017  future  human  discovery  history  Space  interview 
november 2017 by aries1988
As America has turned away from searching for extraterrestrial intelligence, China has built the world’s largest radio dish for precisely that purpose.
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november 2017 by DanHill
In the first episode of The Atlantic Interview , Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie talks with Jeffrey Goldberg and Ta-Nehisi Coates about race and identity. Listen and…
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november 2017 by indirect
As America has turned away from searching for extraterrestrial intelligence, China has built the world’s largest radio dish for precisely that purpose.
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november 2017 by timothyarnold
This sentence. *swoon*
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november 2017 by carlynorama
China’s Race to Find Aliens First - The Atlantic
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november 2017 by jamescampbell
Last January, the Chinese Academy of Sciences invited Liu Cixin, China’s preeminent science-fiction writer, to visit its new state-of-the-art radio dish in the…
november 2017 by jkleske
As America has turned away from searching for extraterrestrial intelligence, China has built the world’s largest radio dish for precisely that purpose.
articles  China  seti  aliens 
november 2017 by gmisra
Last January, the Chinese Academy of Sciences invited Liu Cixin, China’s preeminent science-fiction writer, to visit its new state-of-the-art radio dish in the…
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november 2017 by mattl
Last January, the Chinese Academy of Sciences invited Liu Cixin, China’s preeminent science-fiction writer, to visit its new state-of-the-art radio dish in the…
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november 2017 by kfinlayson
Last January, the Chinese Academy of Sciences invited Liu Cixin, China’s preeminent science-fiction writer, to visit its new state-of-the-art radio dish in the…
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november 2017 by paryshnikov
As America has turned away from searching for extraterrestrial intelligence, China has built the world’s largest radio dish for precisely that purpose.
scienceFiction  astronomy  storyResearch 
november 2017 by basemaly
As America has turned away from searching for extraterrestrial intelligence, China has built the world’s largest radio dish for precisely that purpose.
seti 
november 2017 by josephaleo
As America has turned away from searching for extraterrestrial intelligence, China has built the world’s largest radio dish for precisely that purpose.
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november 2017 by iRunningguy
Great article about humans by
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november 2017 by miloh
As America has turned away from searching for extraterrestrial intelligence, China has built the world’s largest radio dish for precisely that purpose. via Pocket
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november 2017 by colonel2sheds
As America has turned away from searching for extraterrestrial intelligence, China has built the world’s largest radio dish for precisely that purpose.
ES 
november 2017 by bbishop
As America has turned away from searching for extraterrestrial intelligence, China has built the world’s largest radio dish for precisely that purpose.
article 
november 2017 by mud
As America has turned away from searching for extraterrestrial intelligence, China has built the world’s largest radio dish for precisely that purpose.
china 
november 2017 by mvuijlst
As America has turned away from searching for extraterrestrial intelligence, China has built the world’s largest radio dish for precisely that purpose. via Pocket
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november 2017 by schmitz
Preocupante que solo un régimen de partido único haga apuestas a lago plazo
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november 2017 by cesarastudillo
As America has turned away from searching for extraterrestrial intelligence, China has built the world’s largest radio dish for precisely that purpose. via Pocket
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november 2017 by domingogallardo
As America has turned away from searching for extraterrestrial intelligence, China has built the world’s largest radio dish for precisely that purpose. via Pocket
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november 2017 by bschlagel
last January, the Chinese Academy of Sciences invited Liu Cixin, China’s preeminent science-fiction writer, to visit its new state-of-the-art radio dish in the…
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november 2017 by wtd
Last January, the Chinese Academy of Sciences invited Liu Cixin, China’s preeminent science-fiction writer, to visit its new state-of-the-art radio dish in the…
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november 2017 by divigation
last January, the Chinese Academy of Sciences invited Liu Cixin, China’s preeminent science-fiction writer, to visit its new state-of-the-art radio dish in the…
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november 2017 by johnrclark
Last January, the Chinese Academy of Sciences invited Liu Cixin, China’s preeminent science-fiction writer, to visit its new state-of-the-art radio dish in the…
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november 2017 by AramZS
RT : Ross asks, "What happens if China makes first contact?" in the December issue of
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november 2017 by JeremyMcGee
As America has turned away from searching for extraterrestrial intelligence, China has built the world’s largest radio dish for precisely that purpose. via Pocket
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november 2017 by drewcaldwell
As America has turned away from searching for extraterrestrial intelligence, China has built the world’s largest radio dish for precisely that purpose. via Pocket
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november 2017 by Werderbach
Last January, the Chinese Academy of Sciences invited Liu Cixin, China’s preeminent science-fiction writer, to visit its new state-of-the-art radio dish in the…
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november 2017 by bdeskin
Liu Cixin - The Three-Body Problem

At the end of the second volume, one of the main characters lays out the trilogy’s animating philosophy. No civilization should ever announce its presence to the cosmos, he says. Any other civilization that learns of its existence will perceive it as a threat to expand—as all civilizations do, eliminating their competitors until they encounter one with superior technology and are themselves eliminated. This grim cosmic outlook is called “dark-forest theory,” because it conceives of every civilization in the universe as a hunter hiding in a moonless woodland, listening for the first rustlings of a rival.
china  scifi 
november 2017 by zryb
Last January, the Chinese Academy of Sciences invited Liu Cixin, China’s preeminent science-fiction writer, to visit its new state-of-the-art radio dish in the…
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november 2017 by disnet