An engineer’s guide to cloud capacity planning – Increment issue 2: Cloud


34 bookmarks. First posted by ngpestelos july 2017.


An engineer’s guide to cloud capacity planning – Increment issue 2: Cloud via Instapaper
8 days ago by jiahaog
If you’re a small company with big dreams for the future, one of the biggest advantages cloud infrastructure providers have over traditional provisioning systems is the flexibility they offer you to adjust the resources your application uses.
architecture  cloud  analysis  engineering  capacity  planning  devops  capacity-planning  scalability  sizing 
12 days ago by xer0x
The gold standard you’ll want to approach is “No application or service running on your infrastructure not directly involved in controlling the infrastructure needs to be consciously aware of servers joining or leaving the deployment.” It’s a cloud-within-a-cloud; the only knowledge any individual box needs is how to connect to the mesh which routes requests to it and which it should stream its own requests into.

This might sound complicated, but the technology has improved so much recently that it is easily within the reach of the smallest development teams. At my last company, we had a bubblegum-and-duct-tape version of this infrastructure with approximately two weeks of work by a non-specialized engineer who had never used any of the individual pieces before. Other development teams have suffered a lot so that you don’t have to—or at least so that your suffering is concentrated closer to the unique business value provided by your application.
architecture  cloud 
12 days ago by euler
If you’re a small company with big dreams for the future, one of the biggest advantages cloud infrastructure providers have over traditional provisioning systems is the flexibility they offer you to adjust the resources your application uses.
cloud  architecture  analysis  planning  capacity 
12 days ago by geetarista
If you’re a small company with big dreams for the future, one of the biggest advantages cloud infrastructure providers have over traditional provisioning…
from instapaper
13 days ago by rogerhsueh
"An engineer’s guide to cloud capacity planning" - Good practical advice from
from twitter
13 days ago by selfdom
An engineer’s guide to cloud capacity planning, by :
from twitter_favs
9 weeks ago by szymon
If you’re a small company with big dreams for the future, one of the biggest advantages cloud infrastructure providers have over traditional provisioning systems is the flexibility they offer you to adjust the resources your application uses.
devops  cloud 
10 weeks ago by davidmat
All too often engineers “pull from their hindquarters” when it comes to capacity planning. Whilst product owners may not like this approach, it works surprisingly well. Gone are the days where a single product vendor was able to provide you with a quick sizing tool that told you exactly how many CPUs and how much RAM you needed to meet your business requirements.

But as Engineers, we need to build up some quick sizing tricks of our own. Pulling from our hindquarters only comes with a limited level of confidence.

* How many concurrent requests can a CPU handle?
* How much memory does a Ruby process take?
* How long does a typical request take to serve?

This article covers how we can estimate these metrics, and subsequently use them to form an initial sizing position. Obviously, the real success comes in being able to address our sizing mistakes without needing to re-think our approach.
tech  capacity  sizing  techarch  engineering  cloud 
11 weeks ago by billglover
An engineer’s guide to cloud capacity planning
from twitter
12 weeks ago by jpmayo
If you’re a small company with big dreams for the future, one of the biggest advantages cloud infrastructure providers have over traditional provisioning systems is the flexibility they offer you to adjust the resources your application uses.
august 2017 by marionzualo
"You will probably end up using n-tier architecture, with a relatively large number of application servers talking to a relatively small pool of databases (or other backing data stores). This is overwhelmingly the most common model for web application deployment, because it allows you to take advantage of horizontal scalability on your application tier(s) while vertically scaling the database."
devops  engineering  capacityplanning 
july 2017 by nickstenning
RT : I love / envy 's ability to speak both intelligently and relatable on complex issues.
from twitter_favs
july 2017 by eljojo
Increment just shipped a new issue: I wrote about capacity planning for the cloud:
from twitter_favs
july 2017 by cnu
Increment just shipped a new issue: I wrote about capacity planning for the cloud:
from twitter_favs
july 2017 by ngpestelos