Portugal’s radical drugs policy is working. Why hasn’t the world copied it? | News | The Guardian


28 bookmarks. First posted by farley13 10 days ago.


Since it decriminalised all drugs in 2001, Portugal has seen dramatic drops in overdoses, HIV infection and drug-related crime.
drugs  health  decriminalization  portugal 
3 hours ago by soobrosa
Portugal’s radical drugs policy is working. Why hasn’t the world copied it? | W hen the drugs came, they hit all at once. It was the 80s, and by the time one in 10 people had slipped into the depths of heroin use – bankers, university… | http://ift.tt/2A53OuK | via Instapaper and IFTTT
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2 days ago by habi
Portugal’s radical drugs policy is working. Why hasn’t the world copied it? Good question.
from twitter
4 days ago by nwhyte
Good question.
health  portugal 
4 days ago by nwlinks
Since it decriminalised all drugs in 2001, Portugal has seen dramatic drops in overdoses, HIV infection and drug-related crime.
health  politics 
9 days ago by bobpotter
"Portugal’s radical drugs policy is working. Why hasn’t the world copied it?"
from twitter
9 days ago by peterjblack
Alguien que lo sepa: en qué es distinta la legislación portuguesa sobre drogas de la española?
from twitter
9 days ago by hiperactivo
Mouraria
lisbon  portugal 
9 days ago by geo
When the drugs came, they hit all at once. It was the 80s, and by the time one in 10 people had slipped into the depths of heroin use – bankers, university students, carpenters, socialites, miners – Portugal was in a state of panic. The crisis began in the south. via Pocket
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9 days ago by igorette
The opioid crisis soon stabilised, and the ensuing years saw dramatic drops in problematic drug use, HIV and hepatitis infection rates, overdose deaths, drug-related crime and incarceration rates. HIV infection plummeted from an all-time high in 2000 of 104.2 new cases per million to 4.2 cases per million in 2015. The data behind these changes has been studied and cited as evidence by harm-reduction movements around the globe. It’s misleading, however, to credit these positive results entirely to a change in law.

Portugal’s remarkable recovery, and the fact that it has held steady through several changes in government – including conservative leaders who would have preferred to return to the US-style war on drugs – could not have happened without an enormous cultural shift, and a change in how the country viewed drugs, addiction – and itself. In many ways, the law was merely a reflection of transformations that were already happening in clinics, in pharmacies and around kitchen tables across the country. The official policy of decriminalisation made it far easier for a broad range of services (health, psychiatry, employment, housing etc) that had been struggling to pool their resources and expertise, to work together more effectively to serve their communities.
drugs  decriminalisation  review  Portugal  Guardian  2017 
9 days ago by inspiral
When the drugs came, they hit all at once. It was the 80s, and by the time one in 10 people had slipped into the depths of heroin use – bankers, university students, carpenters, socialites, miners – Portugal was in a state of panic. The crisis began in the south. via Pocket
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9 days ago by drewcaldwell
When the drugs came, they hit all at once. It was the 80s, and by the time one in 10 people had slipped into the depths of heroin use – bankers, university students, carpenters, socialites, miners – Portugal was in a state of panic. The crisis began in the south.
Archive  pocket 
10 days ago by cronco