Scientific Search Engines Are Getting More Powerful | WIRED


21 bookmarks. First posted by LaptopHeaven 11 weeks ago.


Excellent, historically-aware explainer. DOES NOT explain the Big Deal, however.
658  openaccess  samizdat  bigdeal  bibliometrics 
9 weeks ago by dsalo
“I grew up in India, and most of the time you didn’t even know if something existed. If you knew it existed, you could try to get it,” Acharya says. “‘How do I get access?’ is a second problem. If I don’t know about it, I won’t even try.”

THE SCIENTIFIC LANDSCAPE is shifting. "If you took a group of academics right now and asked them to create a new system of publishing, nobody would suggest what we're currently doing," says David Barner, a psychologist at UC San Diego and open science advocate. But change, Barner says, is hard. The people who'd make those changes are already overworked, already volunteering their time.
open  science20  wired 
9 weeks ago by edsonm
How scientific search engines like Google Scholar, Microsoft Academic, and Semantic Scholar are helping to bring more research papers out from behind paywalls
11 weeks ago by joeo10
Die unerwarteten Nebenwirkungen von Google Scholar und Co.
from twitter
11 weeks ago by grzbielok
research, paywalls, widening access
open_science  peer_production  Google_Scholar 
11 weeks ago by ptietjen
Interesting overview
from twitter_favs
11 weeks ago by verwinv
Anurag Acharya’s problem was that the Google search bar is very smart, but also kind of dumb. As a Googler working on search 13 years ago, Acharya wanted to make search results encompass scholarly journal articles. via Pocket
IFTTT  Pocket 
11 weeks ago by Werderbach
Scientific Search Engines Are Getting More Powerful via Instapaper http://ift.tt/2nqb8va
IFTTT  Instapaper 
11 weeks ago by stephenfrancoeur
But most science is still paywalled. More than three quarters of published journal articles—114 million on the World Wide Web alone, by one (lowball) estimate—are only available if you are affiliated with an institution that can afford pricey subscriptions or you can swing $40-per-article fees.
openaccess  academia 
11 weeks ago by craniac
Anurag Acharya’s problem was that the Google search bar is very smart, but also kind of dumb. As a Googler working on search 13 years ago, Acharya wanted to make search results encompass scholarly journal articles. via Pocket
Pocket 
11 weeks ago by LaptopHeaven