Raising a Teenage Daughter* — The California Sunday Magazine


58 bookmarks. First posted by fedira 15 days ago.


This is why I loved the piece about raising a teen daughter…annotated by that daughter.
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2 days ago by maura
BY ELIZABETH WEIL *WITH COMMENTS AND CORRECTIONS BY HANNAH W DUANE
4 days ago by hoboyobo
Six months ago, my 15-year-old daughter, Hannah, sent me a video. In it, she’s hanging upside down by her feet from a head-high granite boulder, inching along…
from instapaper
4 days ago by skinnyj
Piece by a mother about raising her 15 year old daughter with commentary by her daughter, poignant and powerful
writing 
5 days ago by jenorr
Six months ago, my 15-year-old daughter, Hannah, sent me a video. In it, she’s hanging upside down by her feet from a head-high granite boulder, inching along from one end to the other. It’s everything that you’d ever want in your child — to be like a baby bat.
Pocket 
6 days ago by iiska
Six months ago, my 15-year-old daughter, Hannah, sent me a video. In it, she’s hanging upside down by her feet from a head-high granite boulder, inching along…
from instapaper
7 days ago by bferg
איך לגדל בת 15 (כולל הערות שוליים של הבת עצמה)
newsletter:49-09-17  read:en  read:all 
7 days ago by alexpo
It’s a tough task. How well do you know your child? How well do you know the situations your child is getting into? What makes it all seem so impossible is that you need to allow your child to get hurt because if you don’t, your child won’t be resilient and will definitely be an ass. But we’re not talking about losing at Candy Land. We’re talking about … it’s hard to say out loud.
longread 
8 days ago by rosscatrow
Because I'm 34 months years away from sharing adventures with a teenager, I'm reading about being there:
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9 days ago by topgold
Six months ago, my 15-year-old daughter, Hannah, sent me a video. In it, she’s hanging upside down by her feet from a head-high granite boulder, inching along from one end to the other. It’s everything that you’d ever want in your child — to be like a baby bat. via Pocket
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9 days ago by archizoo
Six months ago, my 15-year-old daughter, Hannah, sent me a video. In it, she’s hanging upside down by her feet from a head-high granite boulder, inching along from one end to the other. It’s everything that you’d ever want in your child — to be like a baby bat. via Pocket
IFTTT  Pocket 
10 days ago by technogoggles
A mother reflects on raising her teenager daughter in a piece for California Sunday Magazine.
Parts of the text are highlighted and link off to "comments and corrections" written by her daughter.
(Source: California Sunday Magazine)
10 days ago by brianaf
Six months ago, my 15-year-old daughter, Hannah, sent me a video. In it, she’s hanging upside down by her feet from a head-high granite boulder, inching along from one end to the other. It’s everything that you’d ever want in your child — to be like a baby bat.
article 
11 days ago by mud
Six months ago, my 15-year-old daughter, Hannah, sent me a video. In it, she’s hanging upside down by her feet from a head-high granite boulder, inching along…
from instapaper
11 days ago by briansniffen
An article about raising a teenager, with embedded annotation *from the teenager*
news  formats  work  articles 
11 days ago by tristanf
Lovely: An Essay About a Teenager, Annotated by The Teenager
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11 days ago by fake_steve
There is the germ of something brilliant in the format here. A mother writes about her teenage daughter; the daughter annotates the article. Click on the highlighted portions to see the annotations. The effect is one of eavesdropping on a conversation between the inner voices of mother and daughter. Both have precision and charm. Hard to say which is more compelling — the honesty of the dialogue, or the love so clearly present. Would an angry dialogue make such good reading?
teens  parenting  thebrowser 
11 days ago by JohnDrake
"by Elizabeth Weil *with comments and corrections by Hannah W Duane
photograph by Tabitha Soren"

[from the annotations]

"Parents underestimate kids’ ability to figure out what is right for them. My parents originally thought the public arts high school where I just started would be a terrible choice, and now they understand how perfect it is for me."



"I receive, on average, a dozen book titles when I ask for a recommendation from my parents. It would be impossible to read them all. Plus, I want to choose what to focus on and file the rest away. Parents seem to need immediate return on their advice and assume no ideas get recorded for later use."



"Well, I wanted to know everything, back when that seemed reasonable, and I thought adults knew and understood everything, so it made sense to ask. Back then, all of my questions had answers."



"Adults think that kids are going to break if they hear something bad has happened. However, from a fairly young age kids know that terrible things happen, and they know when someone is trying to shelter them. It’s like when I was 4 and I found a dead robin on my grandparents’ deck, and my parents told me, “The bird is done being a bird.” That was OK, but it would have been OK, too, to just say the bird was dead. If you allow a kid to believe that things live forever, it’s going to be a worse experience later because they’re going to learn they were lied to."



"I think this is a complex point. It’s old-fashioned and sexist to think clothing is a major indicator of values. People should be able to wear what they want without worrying about others’ feedback."



"Everyone is “pretty flawed.” Isn’t the whole idea that you grow up and realize nobody is perfect and learn to live with the ways you’re messed up?"



"In my daily life, I take almost no risks. I do my homework; I’m absurdly early to most things. The mountains are the one place where I can relax and take advantage of this calm. I don’t know if I want a risk manager. I want to get better at accepting risk. It’s hard to learn, especially when your parents are cautious people themselves and you have anxiety about disappointing them. And yourself."



"I know my life is going to take some trial and error. I know I need to make the mistakes, and I know I’m going to be humiliated. I’m trying to gather up my courage. People can tell you to take deep breaths, they can tell you to close your eyes, but they can’t make you calm."
teens  parenting  daughters  2017  elizabetheil  hannahduane  annotation  families  children  childhood  death  growingup  adolescence  anxiety  adults  risk  risktaking  disappointment 
11 days ago by robertogreco
Six months ago, my 15-year-old daughter, Hannah, sent me a video. In it, she’s hanging upside down by her feet from a head-high granite boulder, inching along from one end to the other. It’s everything that you’d ever want in your child — to be like a baby bat. via Pocket
11 days ago by laurajnash
Six months ago, my 15-year-old daughter, Hannah, sent me a video. In it, she’s hanging upside down by her feet from a head-high granite boulder, inching along from one end to the other. It’s everything that you’d ever want in your child — to be like a baby bat.
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12 days ago by timothyarnold
Six months ago, my 15-year-old daughter, Hannah, sent me a video. In it, she’s hanging upside down by her feet from a head-high granite boulder, inching along from one end to the other. It’s everything that you’d ever want in your child — to be like a baby bat. via Pocket
Pocket 
12 days ago by driptray
Sundays are for reading essays. Like this one.
ifttt  facebook 
12 days ago by sneakerfish
Daughter's essay on raising her daughter, annotated by her daughter. Great for teaching... annotations? Reader-response? Dialogue journals?
writing  parents  teenagers  mothers  daughters  family  annotations 
12 days ago by mkauffmann
Six months ago, my 15-year-old daughter, Hannah, sent me a video. In it, she’s hanging upside down by her feet from a head-high granite boulder, inching along…
from instapaper
14 days ago by mathewi
Six months ago, my 15-year-old daughter, Hannah, sent me a video. In it, she’s hanging upside down by her feet from a head-high granite boulder, inching along from one end to the other. It’s everything that you’d ever want in your child — to be like a baby bat. via Pocket
IFTTT  Pocket  instapaper 
14 days ago by drewcaldwell
This article is insanely good (I cried, but it’s not sad-sad, just poignant)
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15 days ago by fedira