tsuomela + utopia   41

The Venus Project
"The Venus Project proposes an alternative vision of what the future can be if we apply what we already know in order to achieve a sustainable new world civilization. It calls for a straightforward redesign of our culture in which the age-old inadequacies of war, poverty, hunger, debt and unnecessary human suffering are viewed not only as avoidable, but as totally unacceptable. Anything less will result in a continuation of the same catalog of problems inherent in today's world."
futures  futurism  utopia 
march 2017 by tsuomela
CABINET // The Behavioral Sink
On the 1960-1970 experiments of John B. Calhoun building utopia/dystopias for mice.
psychology  social-psychology  experiment  utopia  overcrowding  crowds 
february 2015 by tsuomela
Invasion of the cyber hustlers
"From Jeff Jarvis to Clay Shirky, a class of gurus are intent on "disrupting" old-fashioned practices like asking us to pay for valuable content. Meanwhile, web giants like Google and Apple jealously guard their profitable secrets. "
books  reviews  commentary  technology-critique  technology  triumphalism  utopia  singularity  rhetoric 
march 2013 by tsuomela
Dear Technoutopianism » Cyborgology
"It’s been a while though, technoutopianism. I’m not a teenager anymore. I’ve changed, but in so many ways you haven’t—and I see you more clearly now. Fred Turner’s right about you, and so are Barbrook and Cameron: you’re selfish. You never really wanted what was best for me, or for any of the rest of us; you wanted deregulation and radical individualism, wanted us out of your way so you could take the whole world—the Whole Earth—for your playground. Hawai’i is for lovers, and your shiny silver future was only for a network of the already privileged and powerful. You got a taste of “the Long Boom”; we got “likes” and LOLcats."
commentary  technology-critique  technology  p2p  triumphalism  utopia  singularity 
march 2013 by tsuomela
The New Atlantis » The Possibility of Progress
"At any moment, the imagination says no to the world as it is while saying yes to an alternative reality — to a world that never was or has yet to be. Behind every vision lies dissatisfaction. This holds true for the statesman as much as for the artist. Both say no to the world in which they find themselves, even as they say yes to its next incarnation, now disincarnate. In his story “The Hall of Fantasy,” Nathaniel Hawthorne hints that every form of human activity verges on the unworldliness of fantasy, negating the present in favor of the future or imagined past. Yet it is the political use of the imagination that attracts Hawthorne’s most skeptical treatment. "
literature  19c  politics  imagination  progress  vision  fantasy  utopia  possibility 
february 2013 by tsuomela
Technopolis: Why so few utopias in science fiction cinema?
"By: Langdon Winner (This is a talk I gave at a panel on science fiction at the conference of the Society for Social Studies of Science, Copenhagen, October 19, 2012.)"
sf  fiction  film  cinema  movies  optimism  utopia  dystopia  pessimism  imagination  future 
january 2013 by tsuomela
'Social Reading' Projects Bring Commentary Into the Text - Technology - The Chronicle of Higher Education
Work by Stephen Duncombe. "The result of his sabbatical labors has just gone live. Called Open Utopia, it's a free, online version of Thomas More's Utopia that anyone can browse—and annotate. An example of what's sometimes called social reading, Open Utopia builds on the idea that a book doesn't have to be a static text. Online, a book can be a gathering place, a shared space where readers record their reactions and conversations. Those interactions ultimately become part of the book too, a kind of amplified marginalia."
digital-humanities  reading  social  social-computing  online  interaction  utopia 
november 2012 by tsuomela
Four Futures
"There are therefore four logical combinations of the two oppositions, resource abundance vs. scarcity and egalitarianism vs. hierarchy. To put things in somewhat vulgar-Marxist terms, the first axis dictates the economic base of the post-capitalist future, while the second pertains to the socio-political superstructure. Two possible futures are socialisms (only one of which I will actually call by that name) while the other two are contrasting flavors of barbarism."
economics  future  capitalism  socialism  freedom  rent  utopia  communism  futurism  post-scarcity  from delicious
april 2012 by tsuomela
Communal Studies Bibliography
"The following lists are an attempt to gather together some of the recent research in Communal Studies. Many, but not all, of the citations for 1993-1999 appeared in issues of the Newsletter of the Communal Studies Association."
community  utopia  commune  bibliography  from delicious
april 2012 by tsuomela
How I Stopped Worrying and Learned to Love the OWS Protests | Politics News | Rolling Stone
"People want out of this fiendish system, rigged to inexorably circumvent every hope we have for a more balanced world. They want major changes. I think I understand now that this is what the Occupy movement is all about. It's about dropping out, if only for a moment, and trying something new, the same way that the civil rights movement of the 1960s strived to create a "beloved community" free of racial segregation. Eventually the Occupy movement will need to be specific about how it wants to change the world. But for right now, it just needs to grow. And if it wants to sleep on the streets for a while and not structure itself into a traditional campaign of grassroots organizing, it should. It doesn't need to tell the world what it wants. It is succeeding, for now, just by being something different."
occupy  protest  utopia  economics  america  wall-street  2011  activism  politics  culture  protests  from instapaper
november 2011 by tsuomela
The Technium: Protopia
"Today we've become so aware of the downsides of innovations, and so disappointed with the promises of past utopias, that we now find it hard to believe even in protopia -- that tomorrow will be better than today. We find it very difficult to imagine any kind of future we would want to live in. Name a single science fiction future that is both plausible and desirable?

No one wants to move to the future today. We are avoiding it. We don't have much desire for life one hundred years from now. Many dread it. That makes it hard to take the future seriously. So we don't take a generational perspective. We're stuck in the short now. We also adopt the Singularity perspective: that imagining the future in 100 years is technically impossible. So there is no protopia we are reaching for. "
future  optimism  fear  protopia  utopia  hope 
august 2011 by tsuomela
Dissent Magazine - Winter 2011 Issue - Real Men Find Real Uto...
Negative review by Russell Jacoby of Envisioning Real Utopias by Erik Olin Wright Verso, 2010, 394 pp.
sociology  utopia  ideology  review  book  academic  marxism 
january 2011 by tsuomela
The Mumpsimus: Utopia and the Gun Culture
by Matthew Cheney. Personal reflections on gun-control from left perspective.
politics  violence  guns  events  extremism  rhetoric  language  right-wing  gun-control  utopia 
january 2011 by tsuomela
Utopia - Charlie's Diary
Which is why I think we badly need more utopian speculation. The consensus future we read about in the media and that we're driving towards is a roiling, turbulent fogbank beset by half-glimpsed demons: climate change, resource depletion, peak oil, mass extinction, collapse of the oceanic food chain, overpopulation, terrorism, foreigners who want to come here and steal our women jobs. It's not a nice place to be; if the past is another country, the consensus view of the future currently looks like a favela with raw sewage running in the streets. Conservativism — standing on the brake pedal — is a natural reaction to this vision; but it's a maladaptive one, because it makes it harder to respond effectively to new and unprecedented problems. We can't stop, we can only go forward; so it is up to us to choose a direction.
utopia  future  imagination 
december 2010 by tsuomela
New Statesman - War of the words
Column by John Gray on contemporary SF. "Reading this book [by Mieville], you realise how much of human life - your own and that of others - passes by unseen. Yet this insight comes without any suggestion that the situation can be changed. We live not in one world, but indefinitely many; we never know when we might cross from one to another, or what might then occur. Neither can we escape. The blurred and treacherous territories of The City and the City go on for ever. There is nowhere else to go."
sf  literature  fiction  books  humanism  utopia 
july 2010 by tsuomela
Open the Future: The "End of Politics" Delusion
...there's a profound ignorance across the tech advocacy community of the importance of politics to human society. Politics means conflict, debate, and frustration. It also means choice. A world without politics is a world where disagreement is illegitimate. It's a world where your ability to choose your future -- to make your future -- has been taken away, whether you like it or not.
politics  power  technology  utopia  escapism 
august 2009 by tsuomela
Techno Triumphalism, Twittering Towards the Singularity | The Agonist
The combined impact of these disasters on the American psyche has left us adrift. The failure of Clinton's dot.com economy to pull us out of our desperate need for petroleum has been well documented by Stirling and others. Web 2.0 is a kind of "sure we don't get paid money for any of this work, but we sure are communicating!" response.

The cult of the singularity is an attempt to get beyond all that. To have something we can believe in again, a vision for the future. Regardless of its truth or falsity, human beings must have a vision to aspire toward.
singularity  technology  optimism  web2.0  twitter  utopia  future  vision  america  modernism 
june 2009 by tsuomela
The Valve - A Literary Organ | Jameson’s Archaeologies of the Future
[Frederic] Jameson’s been interested in science fiction for most of his career, but never before has he published so large a work devoted wholly to the genre—or, more specifically, devoted to utopia, here taken straightforward as a subset of SF.
literature  review  sf  theory  utopia 
march 2007 by tsuomela
Crooked Timber » » Erik Wright on Envisioning Real Utopias
Erik Olin Wright’s manuscript-in-progress, Envisioning Real Utopias is on the web.
utopia  social  science  politics 
march 2007 by tsuomela

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