tsuomela + inequality   100

The new gilded age: Income inequality in the U.S. by state, metropolitan area, and county | Economic Policy Institute
"This report, our fourth such analysis,1 focuses on trends in income inequality. It uses the latest available data to examine how the top 1 percent and the bottom 99 percent in each state have fared over the years 1917–2015 and to provide a snapshot of top incomes in 2015 by county and metropolitan area."
income-distribution  income  inequality  america  economics 
july 2018 by tsuomela
The Remaking of Class | The New Republic
"AMITY AND PROSPERITY: ONE FAMILY AND THE FRACTURING OF AMERICA By Eliza Griswold Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 336 pp., $27 CLASS MATTERS: THE STRANGE CAREER OF AN AMERICAN DELUSION By Steve Fraser Yale University Press, 288 pp., $25 HINTERLAND: AMERICA’S NEW LANDSCAPE OF CLASS AND CONFLICT By Phil A. Neel Reaktion, 192 pp., $20"
boos  review  american-studies  class  politics  labor  rural  inequality 
june 2018 by tsuomela
Silicon Valley’s Rigged Game of Life | The New Republic
"LIVE WORK WORK WORK DIE: A JOURNEY INTO THE SAVAGE HEART OF SILICON VALLEY by Corey PeinMetropolitan Books, 320 pp., $28.00"
book  review  silicon-valley  inequality  business 
may 2018 by tsuomela
Who Are the New Yuppies? | New Republic
"THE SUM OF SMALL THINGS by Elizabeth Currid-Halkett Princeton University Press, 272 pp., $29.95 THE COMPLACENT CLASS by Tyler Cowen Columbia University Press, 128 pp., $26.00"
book  review  class  america  innovation  inequality  signals 
august 2017 by tsuomela
Divided We Fall | New Republic
"The Founders knew that economic inequality would destroy America's democracy. So why can't the Constitution save us?"
america  crisis  politics  history  inequality  wealth  money  progressive  reform  from instapaper
april 2017 by tsuomela
Scheidel, W.: The Great Leveler: Violence and the History of Inequality from the Stone Age to the Twenty-First Century. (eBook and Hardcover)
"Are mass violence and catastrophes the only forces that can seriously decrease economic inequality? To judge by thousands of years of history, the answer is yes. Tracing the global history of inequality from the Stone Age to today, Walter Scheidel shows that inequality never dies peacefully. Inequality declines when carnage and disaster strike and increases when peace and stability return. The Great Leveler is the first book to chart the crucial role of violent shocks in reducing inequality over the full sweep of human history around the world. Ever since humans began to farm, herd livestock, and pass on their assets to future generations, economic inequality has been a defining feature of civilization. Over thousands of years, only violent events have significantly lessened inequality. The "Four Horsemen" of leveling—mass-mobilization warfare, transformative revolutions, state collapse, and catastrophic plagues—have repeatedly destroyed the fortunes of the rich. Scheidel identifies and examines these processes, from the crises of the earliest civilizations to the cataclysmic world wars and communist revolutions of the twentieth century. Today, the violence that reduced inequality in the past seems to have diminished, and that is a good thing. But it casts serious doubt on the prospects for a more equal future. An essential contribution to the debate about inequality, The Great Leveler provides important new insights about why inequality is so persistent—and why it is unlikely to decline anytime soon."
book  publisher  history  economics  inequality  disaster 
february 2017 by tsuomela
Health Inequality Project
"The Health Inequality Project uses big data to measure differences in life expectancy by income across areas and identify strategies to improve health outcomes for low-income Americans."
health  health-care  inequality  economics  mortality  data-sources 
february 2017 by tsuomela
Cultural Dynamics
"Cultural Dynamics is a peer reviewed journal that seeks to publish research focused on the structured inequalities of the contemporary world, and the myriad ways people negotiate these conditions. The journal is thoroughly interdisciplinary, encompassing anthropology, sociology, philosophy, history, and any other areas that can shed light on culture, power, and politics. "
journal  academic  research  social-science  inequality 
november 2016 by tsuomela
Challenging the Oligarchy by Paul Krugman | The New York Review of Books
"Saving Capitalism: For the Many, Not the Few by Robert B. Reich Knopf, 279 pp., $26.95"
book  review  economics  capitalism  inequality  class  oligarchy 
december 2015 by tsuomela
Kapital for the Twenty-First Century? | Dissent Magazine
"Capital in the Twenty-First Century by Thomas Piketty, trans. Arthur Goldhammer Belknap Press, 2014, 671 pp."
book  review  capitalism  income  economics  class  inequality 
march 2014 by tsuomela
The End of American Exceptionalism - Peter Beinart - The Atlantic
"This, in turn, has soured young Americans on the belief that through the free market they can rise above the circumstances of their birth. Which means that, when it comes to declining faith in the American Dream of upward mobility, as with declining faith in organized religion and declining faith in America's special mission in the world, conservatives have helped foment the very backlash against American exceptionalism that they decry."
american  exceptionalism  economics  religion  inequality  mobility 
february 2014 by tsuomela
Capital in the Twenty-First Century — Thomas Piketty | Harvard University Press
"What are the grand dynamics that drive the accumulation and distribution of capital? Questions about the long-term evolution of inequality, the concentration of wealth, and the prospects for economic growth lie at the heart of political economy. But satisfactory answers have been hard to find for lack of adequate data and clear guiding theories. In Capital in the Twenty-First Century, Thomas Piketty analyzes a unique collection of data from twenty countries, ranging as far back as the eighteenth century, to uncover key economic and social patterns. His findings will transform debate and set the agenda for the next generation of thought about wealth and inequality. Piketty shows that modern economic growth and the diffusion of knowledge have allowed us to avoid inequalities on the apocalyptic scale predicted by Karl Marx. But we have not modified the deep structures of capital and inequality as much as we thought in the optimistic decades following World War II. The main driver of inequality—the tendency of returns on capital to exceed the rate of economic growth—today threatens to generate extreme inequalities that stir discontent and undermine democratic values. But economic trends are not acts of God. Political action has curbed dangerous inequalities in the past, Piketty says, and may do so again. A work of extraordinary ambition, originality, and rigor, Capital in the Twenty-First Century reorients our understanding of economic history and confronts us with sobering lessons for today."
book  publisher  economics  inequality  capitalism  democracy  politics 
january 2014 by tsuomela
www.nytimes.com
"Thomas Piketty’s new book, “Capital in the Twenty-First Century,” described by one French newspaper as a “a political and theoretical bulldozer,” defies left and right orthodoxy by arguing that worsening inequality is an inevitable outcome of free market capitalism."
book  review  commentary  economics  inequality  capitalism  democracy  politics 
january 2014 by tsuomela
Two Nations, Under Mammon | The American Conservative
"William Galston has written an important column in the Wall Street Journal, devoted to an assessment of Tyler Cowen’s new book, Average Is Over. The book tells of a coming(?) nation of two economic classes, the meritocratic elite and an increasingly poor, even third-world economic class of underemployed who gather in large ghetto areas (e.g., Texas) with poor public services but plentiful distractions (think: internet porn, 24/7/365 football, and soon-to-be legalized marijuana delivered by e-joints)."
book  economics  future  class  income  inequality 
october 2013 by tsuomela
interfluidity » Trade-offs between inequality, productivity, and employment
"I think there is a tradeoff between inequality and full employment that becomes exacerbated as technological productivity improves. This is driven by the fact that the marginal benefit humans gain from current consumption declines much more rapidly than the benefit we get from retaining claims against an uncertain future.

Wealth is about insurance much more than it is about consumption. As consumers, our requirements are limited. But the curve balls the universe might throw at us are infinite. If you are very wealthy, there is real value in purchasing yet another apartment in yet another country through yet another hopefully-but-not-certainly-trustworthy native intermediary. "
money  wealth  income  income-distribution  insurance  inequality  productivity  employment  technology  from delicious
august 2012 by tsuomela
UnderstandingSociety: Durable inequality
"Chuck Tilly was an enormously creative historical sociologist, and he also had a knack for a good title. This is certainly true of his 1998 book, Durable Inequality. The topic is of particular interest today, in the contemporary environment of ever-more visible and widening inequalities that pervade American society."
book  review  sociology  inequality  money  class  wealth  income  from delicious
july 2012 by tsuomela
The New Elitists - NYTimes.com
" The narrative of openness and talent obscures the bitter truth of the American experience. Talents are costly to develop, and we refuse to socialize these costs. To be an outstanding student requires not just smarts and dedication but a well-supported school, a safe, comfortable home and leisure time to cultivate the self. These are not widely available. When some students struggle, they can later tell the story of their triumph over adversity, often without mentioning the helping hand of a tutor. Other students simply fail without such expensive aids." Annotated link http://www.diigo.com/bookmark/http://www.nytimes.com/2012/07/08/opinion/sunday/the-new-elitists.html
elites  class  economics  ability  success  luck  talent  inequality  from delicious
july 2012 by tsuomela
Guest Review by Aaron Swartz: Chris Hayes’ The Twilight of The Elites — Crooked Timber
"Hayes pins the blame on an unlikely suspect: meritocracy. We thought we would just simply pick out the best and raise them to the top, but once they got there they inevitably used their privilege to entrench themselves and their kids (inequality is, Hayes says, “autocatalytic”). Opening up the elite to more efficient competition didn’t make things more fair, it just legitimated a more intense scramble. The result was an arms race among the elite, pushing all of them to embrace the most unscrupulous forms of cheating and fraud to secure their coveted positions. As competition takes over at the high end, personal worth resolves into exchange value, and the elite power accumulated in one sector can be traded for elite power in another: a regulator can become a bank VP, a modern TV host can use their stardom to become a bestselling author (try to imagine Edward R. Murrow using the nightly news to flog his books the way Bill O’Reilly does). This creates a unitary elite, detached from the bulk of society, yet at the same time even more insecure."
elites  expertise  inequality  income-distribution  power  politics  economics  american  meritocracy  from delicious
june 2012 by tsuomela
American Class System - We Are Not All Created Equal, by Stephen Marche - Esquire
In ten years, the next generation will no longer have the faintest illusion that the United States is a country with equality of opportunity. The least they're entitled to is some honesty about why.
america  inequality  decline  from delicious
december 2011 by tsuomela
Graduates Versus Oligarchs - NYTimes.com
"The big gains have gone to the top 0.1 percent. So income inequality in America really is about oligarchs versus everyone else. When the Occupy Wall Street people talk about the 99 percent, they’re actually aiming too low."
economics  money  income-distribution  wealth  inequality  via:cshalizi 
november 2011 by tsuomela
PLOS ONE: The Spread of Inequality
"We hypothesize, therefore, that the spread of socioeconomic stratification may have been a result of cultural change via demic diffusion. In other words, socioeconomic stratification may have spread across the globe over the past several thousand years, not because it provided apparent advantages that led to its adoption by egalitarian cultures, but simply because it altered demographic outcomes in ways that produced an increase in frequency of stratified populations, through population expansion or the outward migration of populations in search of additional territory and resources."
social  history  development  agent-based-model  inequality  stratification  anthropology  from instapaper
october 2011 by tsuomela
The Great Splintering - Umair Haque - Harvard Business Review
"For many years now, societies have been limping on with broken institutions and splintered social contracts — right into the heart of this perfect storm. And I'd bet most of us have assumed that we'll continue to "get by" — that we can wait for the economy to repair itself, for the next economic boom to provide shelter from the approaching cyclone, for the invisible hand to pick us up and put us back on our feet. Yet, I'd suggest: the upheavals we're seeing now are stark evidence that the status quo's faith-based modus operandi hasn't worked — and isn't working. We're not magically going to "find" shelter from the gathering clouds of this economic whirlwind. We're going to have to build shelter: more resilient, less dysfunctional institutions that can deliver on the promise of real human prosperity that matters, lasts, and multiplies. Because if you didn't know what a lost decade looked and felt like before — well, you sure do now."
crisis  recession  economics  inequality  poverty  business-as-usual  income-distribution 
august 2011 by tsuomela
Inequality and the Dynamics of Public Opinion: The Self-Reinforcing Link Between Economic Inequality and Mass Preferences - Kelly - 2010 - American Journal of Political Science - Wiley Online Library
"This article assesses the influence of income inequality on the public's policy mood. Recent work has produced divergent perspectives on the relationship between inequality, public opinion, and government redistribution. One group of scholars suggests that unequal representation of different income groups reproduces inequality as politicians respond to the preferences of the rich. Another group of scholars pays relatively little attention to distributional outcomes but shows that government is generally just as responsive to the poor as to the rich. Utilizing theoretical insights from comparative political economy and time-series data from 1952 to 2006, supplemented with cross-sectional analysis where appropriate, we show that economic inequality is, in fact, self-reinforcing, but that this is fully consistent with the idea that government tends to respond equally to rich and poor in its policy enactments."
political-science  inequality  public-opinion  polls  reinforcement  economics  government  redistribution 
august 2011 by tsuomela
Of the 1%, by the 1%, for the 1% | Society | Vanity Fair
"Americans have been watching protests against oppressive regimes that concentrate massive wealth in the hands of an elite few. Yet in our own democracy, 1 percent of the people take nearly a quarter of the nation’s income—an inequality even the wealthy will come to regret."
economics  income  income-distribution  money  wealth  power  inequality 
april 2011 by tsuomela
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