tsuomela + epidemiology   14

The Parable of Google Flu: Traps in Big Data Analysis
"In February 2013, Google Flu Trends (GFT) made headlines but not for a reason that Google executives or the creators of the flu tracking system would have hoped. Nature reported that GFT was predicting more than double the proportion of doctor visits for influenza-like illness (ILI) than the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), which bases its estimates on surveillance reports from laboratories across the United States (1, 2). This happened despite the fact that GFT was built to predict CDC reports. Given that GFT is often held up as an exemplary use of big data (3, 4), what lessons can we draw from this error?"
big-data  epidemiology  google  data-curation  bias 
october 2014 by tsuomela
Flu Near You | HealthMap
"Flu Near You is a site administered by Healthmap of Boston Children’s Hospital in partnership with the American Public Health Association and the Skoll Global Threats Fund. Flu Near You is open to anyone for browsing. Any individual living in the United States or Canada, 13 years of age or older, can register to complete brief, weekly surveys that help all of us learn more about the flu. This effort is supported with private funds to demonstrate its utility for multiple sectors who must work together for pandemic preparedness if data is openly shared. The information on the site will be available to public health officials, researchers, disaster planning organizations and anyone else who may find this information useful."
influenza  diseases  monitor  epidemiology  season  google  crowdsourcing  health 
september 2014 by tsuomela
The Hidden Geometry of Complex, Network-Driven Contagion Phenomena
The global spread of epidemics, rumors, opinions, and innovations are complex, network-driven dynamic processes. The combined multiscale nature and intrinsic heterogeneity of the underlying networks make it difficult to develop an intuitive understanding of these processes, to distinguish relevant from peripheral factors, to predict their time course, and to locate their origin. However, we show that complex spatiotemporal patterns can be reduced to surprisingly simple, homogeneous wave propagation patterns, if conventional geographic distance is replaced by a probabilistically motivated effective distance. In the context of global, air-traffic–mediated epidemics, we show that effective distance reliably predicts disease arrival times. Even if epidemiological parameters are unknown, the method can still deliver relative arrival times. The approach can also identify the spatial origin of spreading processes and successfully be applied to data of the worldwide 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic and 2003 SARS epidemic.
networks  epidemiology  epidemics  geography 
december 2013 by tsuomela
Destroying Nature Unleashes Infectious Diseases - NYTimes.com
If we fail to understand and take care of the natural world, it can cause a breakdown of these systems and come back to haunt us in ways we know little about. A critical example is a developing model of infectious disease that shows that most epidemics — AIDS, Ebola, West Nile, SARS, Lyme disease and hundreds more that have occurred over the last several decades — don’t just happen. They are a result of things people do to nature.
environment  ecology  biology  disease  epidemiology  epidemics  nature  evolution  geography  from delicious
july 2012 by tsuomela
Open Collections Program: Contagion - Historical Views of Diseases and Epidemics
Harvard’s new “open collection” contributes to the understanding of the global, social–history, and public–policy implications of diseases and offers important historical perspectives on the science and the public policy of epidemiology today.
archive  collection  online  epidemiology  medicine  sts  science  history  humanities 
march 2008 by tsuomela
Scientists Make First Map Of Emerging-Disease Hotspots - The Earth Institute at Columbia University
An international research team has provided the first scientific evidence that deadly emerging diseases have risen steeply across the world, and has mapped the outbreaks’ main sources. They say new diseases originating from wild animals in poor nations
mapping  diseases  epidemiology  ecology  environment 
february 2008 by tsuomela
The Pump Handle
The Pump Handle is a place for people interested in public health and the environment to discuss the issues that interest us, particularly when they’re not getting the treatment we think they deserve in the mainstream media.
weblog-group  public  health  biology  epidemiology  policy 
november 2007 by tsuomela

Copy this bookmark:



description:


tags: