10495
Costco is going to extremes to keep its rotisserie chickens at $4.99 - CNN
More vertical integration in retail.

> The nearly 400,000 square-foot plant in Fremont will employ 950 workers. The plant will take 45 weeks to ramp up to full production. Once it's at full speed, the plant will process about 100 million chickens a year, or 40% of Costco's annual chicken needs.

Incredible demand for chicken.
october 2019
The Passion Economy and the Future of Work
I was blown away that someone on Substack makes $500,000/yr in subscriptions. Wow.

> Users can now build audiences at scale and turn their passions into livelihoods, whether that’s playing video games or producing video content. This has huge implications for entrepreneurship and what we’ll think of as a “job” in the future.

This article is all a bit overstated, as one might expect from a venture firm, but the core concepts are interesting. I don't think it’s defining the future of jobs, but it might make it easier to create a lot of small service-based companies, solopreneurs.
october 2019
How to Write Fast Code in Ruby on Rails – Shopify Engineering
I wanted this to be a joke with the punchline being to rewrite it in Java or Go. That's how Twitter did it after all. The guidelines here are solid for any higher level language. When performance matters, you need to understand what your code is doing at the lower levels. And caching is true for performance in so many environments, frameworks, and languages.
october 2019
Eliud Kipchoge Breaks Two-Hour Marathon Barrier - The New York Times
Sure this was optimized to do everything to help him hit the time, but it’s still an absolutely amazing achievement! 😲
_brief 
october 2019
Everyone Thinks They’re Managing by Outcomes. Here’s How to Actually Do it. | Product Talk
There is a lot to chew on here.

> When teams only communicate their conclusions—the features they’ll implement, the projects they’ll execute, and the initiatives they’ll deliver—managers focus their feedback on those conclusions.
>
> This keeps us solidly in the world of micromanaging outputs.

I love this delineation of outputs and outcomes. The structures shared in this writeup to illustrate the product and opportunity space a product team is working on seem very interesting.
october 2019
iOS Shortcuts Ultimate Guide: Reviews, Examples, Libraries, Tutorials...
There is so much power in iOS 13's Shortcuts that I keep wanting to link to every article I read about them in the hope that more and more people see ways they can use it to automate things using their mobile.
october 2019
First Look: New Emojis in iOS 13.2
Tons of new Emoji coming to Apple devices. Great evolution of the skin tone picker and the adoption of new [gender-neutral Emoji](https://blog.emojipedia.org/unicode-brings-forward-gender-neutral-timeline/).
october 2019
Where we do and don’t want automation | Derek Sivers
I've experienced something similar to this concept specifically around automation on the personal level. Certain things shouldn't be automated because it creates an abstraction, that removes personality and emotion.
october 2019
Libro.fm | Libro.fm, Your Independent Bookstore for Digital Audiobooks
I didn’t know this service existed. It has the same $15/mo subscription to get one audiobook each month, just like Audible. I might switch to this just to diversify my spend away from Amazon a bit.
october 2019
‎Quickness: Add Voice Contacts on the App Store
Found this little gem of an app via [MacStories iOS and iPadOS 13 App Roundup](https://www.macstories.net/roundups/ios-and-ipados-13-app-roundup-multiwindow-dark-mode-shortcuts-and-more/). I use Contacts extensively, and being able to build Shortcuts that make it easier to add contacts is a great win. $2, easy buy for me.
october 2019
The China Cultural Clash – Stratechery by Ben Thompson
Good article discussing the complexities of doing business in China following on the NBA issues started with a single tweet. 🇨🇳
october 2019
n8n.io - Workflow Automation
Automation platforms like Zapier are pretty cool, and it’s neat to see a new open source project that does similar. I could easily see this being something that others would extend to connect to more services over time. I wonder if you could embed it into another project, would depend on the license.
october 2019
Joint statement on the GNU Project — 2019 — Blog — GNU Guix
Wow, I must say I wasn't expecting this but it’s good to see. Richard Stallman quickly resigned or was dismissed from MIT and the Free Software Foundation, but he remained in his leadership role at GNU. Now we have GNU maintainers signing a petition that he should be removed there too.

> Yet, we must also acknowledge that Stallman’s behavior over the years has undermined a core value of the GNU project: the empowerment of *all* computer users. GNU is not fulfilling its mission when the behavior of its leader alienates a large part of those we want to reach out to.

It’s good to see people thinking broader than just the code or specific single focus area that people contribute to our community.
october 2019
macOS 10.15 Catalina: The Ars Technica review | Ars Technica
If you want to know everything you ever wanted to about macOS Catalina, this is the other of the two articles for you. There is more to this release than it looks. 👨‍💻
_brief 
october 2019
Chernobyl's Infamous Reactor 4 Control Room Is Now Open to Tourists
Not sure this is a tour I would want to take. Chernobyl isn't that far from where I go when I visit Ukraine. I think I should visit the site on a future visit. Probably pass on the room that requires booties and a Geiger counter though.
october 2019
Solid State: Minnesota's High Tech History - Twin Cities PBS
I [was at the premier](https://micro.thingelstad.com/2019/10/08/attending-the-premier.html) of this movie. It is an interesting look at the minicomputer market that thrived in Minnesota. I learned some new things, like Control Data was the first company to sell peripherals for other companies minicomputers. What did Minnesota miss? By all counts we completely missed the microcomputer movement here.
october 2019
macOS Catalina: The MacStories Review - MacStories
If you want to know everything you ever wanted to about macOS Catalina, this is one of the two articles for you. 👩‍💻
_brief 
october 2019
Three Big Things: The Most Important Forces Shaping the World · Collaborative Fund
An interesting, open-ended article about the "big things" that are likely to be shaping the future.

> Demographics, inequality, and information access will have a huge impact on the coming decades. How those Big Things end is a story yet to be told. But when it’s told we’ll have a better idea of where it began.

🤔
october 2019
Writing is Thinking: Learning to Write with Confidence
There is a lot here as an overview of an entire writing process. Even though it’s a lot, I think it’s a good read for those that, like me, want to write better. I particularly like the beginning:

> Writing is essentially a robust tool that enables us to clarify and communicate our thoughts. While writing, you are forcing yourself to think critically and exercise parts of your brain that are typically on auto-pilot. As Einstein once said, “If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough.” In attempting to formulate a written piece, you are going through the exercise of transforming vague ideas into clarified concepts externally, but also internally.

To me this is the barrier. I'll get a headline or topic in mind, but I need to create the space to clarify my thoughts. It’s not the writing that is difficult, it’s the thinking.

Related, this is why I despise bullets for communicating things of substance. Bullets, unlike actual writing, **do not require you to clarify your thoughts.** You simply state random blips, and assume that will be understood, which it often is not.
_feature 
october 2019
Different Types of Wine 18" x 24" Poster - Wine Folly
The relationships in this graph are super easy to follow. Probably the best wine classification/overview I've seen. 🍷
_brief 
october 2019
Multi Cloud Happens But Not Necessarily By Design | StackSense
This article highlights three common reasons that organizations adopt multiple cloud providers. The ones listed make sense but the one I was surprised wasn't on the list is leveraging the specific strengths of different cloud providers. AWS, Azure, and Google Cloud each have areas they excel over the others so I was a bit surprised that "best of breed" solution didn’t make the list here. I agree with the premise that Multi Cloud is a reality that many organizations will have, and I think it’s much more pragmatic than the earlier focus on Cloud Portability.
october 2019
TikTok owner ByteDance's first-half books $7 billion in revenue
I have no interest in TikTok, but I know "the kids" seem to dig it. I was blown away by the revenue numbers though. 💰💰💰
_brief 
october 2019
Opinion | I Used to Fear Being a Nobody. Then I Left Social Media. - The New York Times
There is a lot of social fatigue out there.

> I grow weary when I think of this as the new normal for what is considered to be a fruitful personal life. Social media is no longer a mere public extension of our private socialization; it has become a replacement for it.

I suspect that is part of that fatigue.
october 2019
The Single Most Important Internal Email in the History of Amazon
An interesting read looking at organizational design along synchronous v. asynchronies, and co-located v. distributed, and the advantages and disadvantages of each of those.
october 2019
52 Things I Know At 52 – Rhoneisms
My friend [Patrick Rhone](https://www.patrickrhone.net/) reflecting on his 52nd birthday, or version 5.2.0 ([what?](https://www.thingelstad.com/2018/your-version-number)).
october 2019
Beachheads and Obstacles – Stratechery by Ben Thompson
Great writing, as always, from Ben Thompson on Amazon and Facebook's recent product announcements and how they are trying to strategically vie with Apple and Google.
october 2019
Apple’s New Map, Expansion #5: Northeast U.S.
I’m not really that into maps, and I’m guessing not many of you are either, but this is a really interesting read that highlights the incredible technology that goes into creating the amazing maps that Google has and Apple is trying to catch up to and pass ahead. There is an amazing amount of innovation here.
october 2019
Agenda Gains Drawing and Handwriting Features, Plus Document Scanning and Dark Mode Enhancements - MacStories
Agenda is the application I use to keep notes from various meetings that I attend throughout the day. I've tried a lot of different tools, and Agenda's unique view of notes and calendar being intertwined is awesome for business. Adding pen input was one of my wishlist items for the product.
october 2019
tvOS 13: The MacStories Review - MacStories
Apple continues to make pretty big changes in the tvOS environment. Multi-user being added is a big deal, and most notably is there to enable Apple Arcade to extend easily to the TV. This platform still feels like it’s finding its way, but is evolving in an interesting place and has a lot of utility as it is.
october 2019
Self-serve first: the overlooked but essential paradigm underlying great software companies
Reducing friction to all parts of a business can yield tremendous results.

> Most self-serve first products start being used by small customers (typically entrepreneurs or developers) that are overlooked by the incumbents since they are too hard (for said incumbents) to acquire and cost-effectively serve. This initial footprint serves as the beachhead for the company, helping it developing strong customer loyalty and word-of-mouth acquisition through great experiences, as well as a much lower cost to serve them. In some ways, it serves as the base camp for the assault on the incumbents’ bread and butter, financed by the profitable low end customer base. As the company inexorably acquires larger customers and creeps upmarket, the lower cost of customer acquisition — powered by word-of-mouth — coupled with higher customer loyalty and retention and lower cost of serving the customer, makes it an extremely formidable competitor for incumbents to compete with. This is the definition of disruption.

This is a solid playbook for many markets.
october 2019
Daring Fireball: Richard Stallman’s Disgrace
More on Stallman's interactions and behavior.
_brief 
october 2019
What do executives do, anyway? - apenwarr
I've had Andy Grove's High Output Management on my book list for a while but I haven't yet read it. This article is an interesting summarization of part of it.

> To paraphrase the book, the job of an executive is: to define and enforce culture and values for their whole organization, and to ratify good decisions.
>
> That's all.
>
> Not to decide. Not to break ties. Not to set strategy. Not to be the expert on every, or any topic. Just to sit in the room while the right people make good decisions in alignment with their values. And if they do, to endorse it. And if they don't, to send them back to try again.
>
> There's even an algorithm for this.

Good writeup, and the epilogue, doubilogue, all the way to quadrilogue are good too.
_feature 
october 2019
WeWork Is Unloading Adam Neumann's Cronies—and His Private Jet | Vanity Fair
Maybe I should stop reading all the crazy stuff coming out of WeWork, but this is just too good.

> A group of 10-plus staffers referred to internally as the “oval office” will also be exiting the company, according to the Journal, including several friends who worked on Neumann's personal deals.

and then…

> One of the biggest hallmarks of Neumann's WeWork legacy set to leave the company in his wake, though, is the former CEO's $60 million private jet, which the post-Neumann WeWork is now planning to sell.

oh, and you don't think there is more…

> Neumann spent even more money by renovating the jet, adding two bedrooms and Apple TVs—complete with shows and movies that staff members spent “three days straight” downloading—to the private jet, which the then-CEO frequently used as a meeting space. “I know of instances where people got on the plane, flew across the country, and flew commercial home,” one executive told Business Insider.

Wow. Just wow.
september 2019
A Whole New Look for Darkroom: Light Mode, Multiple Spaces, Shortcut Action, and Sound Effects
I’m very impressed with what Darkroom is doing with photo editing on iOS platforms. I’m particularly excited to see them adding Shortcut support so quickly. If you grab an iPad Pro and Darkroom you've got a pretty incredible photo editing tool. 📷
september 2019
SportsEngine, Inc. Announces Leadership Transition and Record Growth
Congratulations to my friend [Anna Klombies](https://www.linkedin.com/in/annaklombies/) and the other leaders at SportsEngine on such an amazing run as they transition to the next "generation" of leadership. 👏
september 2019
The Father Of “Getting Things Done”: You’re Getting Me All Wrong
It took me years of practicing GTD to get the "mind like water" mentality. I’m not able to stay there all the time, but when I’m most in tune with my system I can.

> Although it’s often seen as a complicated time management system, GTD, according to Allen, is really about creating mental space. “You can’t manage time,” he says. “Time just is. That’s not the big issue. The big issue is really space. When people say they need time management, it’s usually because something is feeling out of control or inappropriately focused.”

🕴
_feature 
september 2019
Google Contractors Officially Vote to Unionize - VICE
This is actually HCL employees unionizing, not Google employees, the the headline including Google gets more clicks. Just another example of employees in the technology sector organizing more.
september 2019
Every business leader should read Charlene Li's "The Disruption Mindset" - without bullshit
Very strong endorsement for [The Disruption Mindset](https://charleneli.com/disruption-mindset/).

> According to Charlene, the three elements of disruptive transformation are:
>
> 1. A strategy inspired by future customers to make big gulp decisions.
> 2. Leadership that creates a movement of disruptors.
> 3. A culture that thrives with disruption

I’m in! Order placed! 📚
september 2019
Drafts 15 Review: Multiwindow, Shortcuts, and More - MacStories
Drafts is one of these amazingly powerful iOS apps that hides it’s power, sometimes a little too much. This review is a good read just to see what is possible. iPadOS support for multiple windows is going to be a big deal, and Shortcuts in iOS 13 unlocks so much potential! 😲
september 2019
Opinion | Jaron Lanier Fixes the Internet - The New York Times
This is a cool video piece from NY Times working with Lanier. This is a decent primer on basic privacy matters. I’m uneasy with the idea that we should get paid for our private data. I'd rather not give it at all.
september 2019
The Distribution of Users’ Computer Skills: Worse Than You Think
This is a good read to better understand the likely user of the software you are building. It takes very little complexity to stop most people in their tracks. 😬
september 2019
WHAT THE GOLF?
I grabbed this game via Apple Arcade and it is just awesome. It makes you chuckle, it’s lighthearted, and just a fun time. Give it a try. 🕹
_brief 
september 2019
jsonbox.io | HTTP based JSON storage
Fun! "jsonbox.io lets you store, read & modify JSON data over HTTP APIs for free." Not sure about building stuff on this, but it’s a great utility. I wish S3 could do this natively. I've had a feature I've wanted to add to my websites that could be great for this.
september 2019
A love letter to my website - DESK Magazine
This is written from the perspective of a designer and using a personal website to express a design perspective. I’m still in the camp that everyone should have their own website.
september 2019
How it works - Leave Me Alone
This is a pretty great idea for a little service for your email. It appears to just look at the unsubscribe links in emails you get and makes it easy for you to trigger them. I’m pretty good about unsubscribing, but I know that a **lot** of people do not. Handy tool!
september 2019
watchOS 6: The MacStories Review - MacStories
watchOS 6 feels like it’s turning a corner towards Apple Watch being it’s own, stand-alone device. The addition of the App Store seems almost silly, but it’s a big deal to go that way. It feels like sometime in the next couple years we'll see an Apple Watch that is a true peer of the iPhone, instead of a younger sibling.
september 2019
STRML: Projects and Work
Geeky, but fun for folk that know how web technology works.
_brief 
september 2019
WeWTF, Part Deux | No Mercy / No Malice
Want more on the mess that is We Work? Here's more! 😳
september 2019
Is We Work a Fraud? - Henry Hawksberry - Medium
25 points highlighting the mess at We Work.

> WeWork will never ever, in its short history, generate a profit, let alone the tens of billions in revenues necessary to generate anywhere near the $3 billion in earnings required to (even then generously) value the company at £47 billion.

[Adam Neumann is no longer CEO](https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2019-09-24/wework-ex-ceo-to-staff-too-much-focus-has-been-placed-on-me). I wonder if the damage can be repaired. They lost 2/3rds of their value in the run to the IPO. 💰⤵️🕳
september 2019
Here’s why so many apps are asking to use Bluetooth on iOS 13 - The Verge
I've noticed this and have been surprised, and declined, some of the apps asking for this. 🛑
september 2019
Breville BDC450 "Precision Brewer" Coffee Maker — Tools and Toys
I've already got two great coffeemakers, a [Ratio 8](https://ratiocoffee.com/products/eight) and a [Bonavita](http://bonavitaworld.com/products/8-cup-one-touch-1), but if I were looking now I would seriously consider this. I like the addition of these precision coffee makers that can execute repeatable and modifiable programs. ☕️
september 2019
Announcing my Shortcuts Library, featuring 150 Siri Shortcuts to use with iOS 13 - Matthew Cassinelli
I’m a big fan of Shortcuts. I love what iOS 13 has done for Shortcuts. Cassinelli was an early member of the Shortcuts (then Workflow) team. He's made a ton of Shortcuts available to download. There is a lot here that you could use directly, or serve as inspiration.
september 2019
An Exclusive Look Inside Apple's A13 Bionic Chip | WIRED
I love to see Om Malik guest writing in Wired on the new A13 chip. Just read this real slow for a moment.

> By the time Santhanam was done talking, all I could think of were the numbers. Apple’s new chip contains 8.5 billion transistors. Also, there are six CPU cores: Two high-performance cores running at 2.66 GHz (called Lightning), and four efficiency cores (called Thunder). It has a quad-core graphics processor, an LTE modem, an Apple-designed image processor, and an octa-core neural engine for machine intelligence functions that can run over five trillion operations per second.

That's on a thing that runs on a battery in your pocket for 18 hours! It’s impossible to really fathom how far this stuff has come.
september 2019
iOS and iPadOS 13: The MacStories Review - MacStories
I don't know how long Viticci has been holed up writing this massive iOS and iPadOS 13 review, but it’s the definitive one on the topic. Get a cup, no, a pot of coffee and sit down for a read. 📖
september 2019
Richard Stallman and the Fall of the Clueless Nerd | WIRED
I ran across this article to [Remove Richard Stallman](https://medium.com/@selamie/remove-richard-stallman-fec6ec210794) over last weekend. Stallman's statements in this email are reprehensible. Four days later an [Appendix A](https://medium.com/@selamie/remove-richard-stallman-appendix-a-a7e41e784f88) was added to it. That same day [Stallman resigned from MIT](https://www.stallman.org/archives/2019-jul-oct.html#16_September_2019_(Resignation)) and also [resigned from the Free Software Foundation](https://www.fsf.org/news/richard-m-stallman-resigns). [VICE has a writeup on this all](https://www.vice.com/en_us/article/mbm74x/computer-scientist-richard-stallman-resigns-from-mit-over-epstein-comments), but this piece from [Steven Levy](https://www.stevenlevy.com), who wrote one of my favorite books, [Hackers](https://www.stevenlevy.com/index.php/books/hackers), that introduces Stallman at the end, frames the whole thing up.

> Yesterday RMS resigned from MIT and the Free Software Foundation he founded. For those who have followed his free-software movement, Stallman leaving MIT is like the big dome on Massachusetts Avenue itself getting an eviction notice. But after decades of tone-deaf comportment and complaints now emerging from women about his behavior, Stallman’s time was up.

His time was up. I actually met Stallman once and had lunch with him. My friend and former professor [John Riedl](https://www.thingelstad.com/2013/goodbye-to-my-friend-john-riedl) was asked to have lunch with Stallman when he was speaking at the University of Minnesota in the early 2000's. He asked me to join them. The lunch was not great. Stallman isn't terribly pleasant, and dissected language and questions in a way that was very off-putting. I asked him a lot about the Internet, and after a couple of questions he looked at me and said "You know, computers can do things without being on the Internet.". Okay then.

Back to the point of this article though. This all happened fast, all the better. But hopefully that doesn't let our industry sweep under the rug some self-examination that should be happening here.

> There are tragic threads to this Stallman story. His inability to understand the hurt that comes from insensitivity led to his expulsion from the world he knew and loved. I worry what will happen next for him. But the greater tragedy is how long it took for such behavior to become disqualifying. While Stallman is uniquely Stallman, he was also a representative of a culture that failed to welcome the women who could have led hacking, and computing, to even greater heights. Stallman is now more alone than I found him 35 years ago. But do not call him the last of his kind. More will fall as the reckoning continues.

That is a powerful statement, and one that is worth reflecting on. Think of other thought leaders in technology space that are routinely offensive and insulting.
_feature 
september 2019
How Adam Neumann’s Over-the-Top Style Built WeWork. ‘This Is Not the Way Everybody Behaves.’ - WSJ
Time to refill the popcorn. 🍿 I feel like we are still just getting to the surface of what is at the heart of WeWork.

> He relishes trips in private jets. Last year, We bought one for more than $60 million, people familiar with the sale said. Mr. Neumann has borrowed more than $740 million against his stock and has sold multiple hundred million dollars of shares, people familiar with those sales say, eliciting widespread criticism from analysts and Silicon Valley investors. These share sales weren’t disclosed in the IPO prospectus.

Where there is smoke… 🔥
september 2019
iPhone 11 Pro Camera Review — Austin Mann
Talking about the camera in the new iPhone 11 Pro is the wrong way to understand it. Austin Mann again shoots some amazing pro level shots with the new system.

> No matter what iPhone you are using now, if you are serious about shooting photos with your iPhone, this is a year to upgrade. Apple had some serious catching up to do and as a result, this year has brought a tremendous leap in camera capability. Night mode and the Ultra Wide lens will change how we tell stories and express ourselves as artists using our iPhones. Now is a really good time to jump in.

The photo geek in me is aching. 😳
september 2019
Announcing the Shortcuts Field Guide, iOS 13 Edition — MacSparky
If you want to learn how to use Shortcuts, MacSparky's field guide is probably the best $29 you can spend.
_brief 
september 2019
A Week On The Wrist: The Apple Watch Series 5 Edition In Titanium - HODINKEE
I like reading when *watch* magazines write reviews of the Apple Watch, because their perspective is entirely different. I really enjoy fine watches, but I find it very beneficial to have the capabilities of the Apple Watch. Luckily the Apple Watch is a pretty fine watch. However, as long as I've had it I've always been bothered that you cannot subtly check the time with a glance. It takes a somewhat exaggerated movement to wake up the watches display.

> As I started wearing the watch around, I found the always-on screen a bit disorienting a first. After years of expecting there to be a shiny black void, I suddenly had something staring back at me even when I wasn't paying it deliberate attention. In a funny way, after the initial weirdness wore off, it actually made the Series 5 feel more natural and comfortable. As someone who's most often wearing an analog watch of some kind or another, I'm very used to more subtle time-checking gestures and to always having my watch's hands and dial visible. Even beyond the functionality, this makes the Series 5 feel more like a watch than any previous Apple Watch.

I’m super happy to hear this. Need to place that order… ⌚️
september 2019
Daring Fireball: Apple Watch Series 5
That always on display is a big deal.

> To me, the always-on display is the Apple Watch’s retina display moment — once you see it, you can’t go back.

👍
september 2019
13 Features of iOS 13: Shortcuts - Six Colors
Shortcuts in iOS 13 are a big deal. I've been a big user of Shortcuts since it was an independent app called Workflow. The updates to the "programming" paradigm are really nice, and I think will open up Shortcut creation to a lot of new people. The Weekly Thing is actually assembled entirely fifteen or so Shortcuts working together!
september 2019
Daring Fireball: The iPhone 11 and iPhones 11 Pro
Tons of details and very good review of the new iPhone 11 and 11 Pro. It’s amazing how much modern smart phones are focusing on the camera system.
september 2019
iPhone 11 Pro Preview: The Camera Hardware Changes - Halide
Some great details on the new cameras in the iPhone 11.

> We got new sensors! The biggest notable change across the board this year is what we already teased: the max ISO of the sensors has gone up significantly. The Wide camera’s maximum ISO sensitivity is up 33%; the telephoto 42%!

This new iPhone is going to capture some phenomenal photos. 📷
september 2019
The Consumerism Curse – On my Om
This is one of those things that we don’t think about as much as other things, but is definitely a thing to be more self-aware about.

> Another source say, “175 billion items of clothing are made every year. 50 billion go straight to landfill, and another 50 billion go to landfill after not selling.” In 2018, H&M, a Swedish fast-fashion giant burned $4.3 billion worth of inventory.

That is shocking. Over 50% of clothing items made are simply discarded! 🔥👕
september 2019
'They wanted me gone': Edward Snowden tells of whistleblowing, his AI fears and six years in Russia | US news | The Guardian
Good read on what Snowden has been up to in exile in Russia, drumming up some interest for his new book [Permanent Record](https://www.panmacmillan.com/authors/edward-snowden/permanent-record/9781529035650). Snowden is a smart, well-thought out individual. The memoir might be a good read.
september 2019
James Whatley on Twitter: "June 5th, 2017 I tried to take my own life."
I've subscribed to Watley's Five Things on Friday newsletter and in [Issue #303](https://us8.campaign-archive.com/?u=a84512488c22cce34b03cbcaa&id=9d9a3a29bc) he linked to this Tweet-thread where he shares a very personal and important story.
september 2019
Your Attention Is Sovereign - Start Select Reset Zine 001
This is a great explanation of why I am so focused on privacy online.
_brief 
september 2019
What interview questions really mean
There is a lot of truth to this.

> But underlying each interview question is really a broader picture the interviewer is trying to fill out. Recruiters really want to know if you are going to use your knowledge effectively to enhance the mission of the organization.

Add this to the argument that job descriptions that highlight geniuses that work alone to output amazing value are often misleading. Curiosity, application, and learning. Repeat.
september 2019
Inside Kickstarter’s year of turmoil—and a union effort that could be a first for the tech industry.
The union drive at Kickstarter continues to move along, and get uglier. I never had read the origin story of this, why did a union push even start?

> What happened over the next seven days rattled the Kickstarter staff. After the Breitbart article, the project had to be reviewed by Kickstarter’s Trust and Safety team, which audits whether disputed content violates the company’s community guidelines or is making other users unsafe. Because it was satirical, Always Punch Nazis may not have been a clear-cut case. According to multiple current and former employees, the Trust and Safety team initially decided not to act against Always Punch Nazis. But then management overruled the team, saying that Always Punch Nazis had to come down.

I can’t remember ever hearing of a tech company anywhere remotely like Kickstarter having a union workforce. This seems like a very tough situation for both sides.
september 2019
Facing the Great Reckoning Head-On - danah boyd - Medium
danah boyd's acceptance speech receiving an award from the EFF is a must-read, particularly for men in the tech industry. The timing of this alongside Stallman's resignations from MIT and FSF add power to the moment.
_feature 
september 2019
I've Built Multiple Growth Teams. Here's Why I Won't Do It Again. | CXL
Interesting observations from someone that has built growth teams at some high growth companies.

> This thing crushed sign-up conversions. After a year of testing, we had this page almost perfectly optimized. The headline, the URL box, the call-to-action (CTA) button copy, the secondary CTA toward the bottom, even the random stock-photo dude. This page converted triple the number of signups compared to more generic SaaS homepages.
>
> The thing is, multiple executives hated this page. I had to defend it regularly to keep it live. After I left, the homepage immediately changed to something more generic.

A good read in general.
september 2019
Stripe Corporate Card: The corporate card for fast-growing businesses
New offering from Stripe for companies. Getting a message from your credit card after a business expense and messaging the photo of the receipt back seems very cool. Very innovative ideas here.
september 2019
Apple Arcade — Let the games begin
100 second overview of games coming in Apple Arcade. 🎮
_brief 
september 2019
Encrypted DNS could help close the biggest privacy gap on the Internet. Why are some groups fighting against it? —Deeplinks
I've done a lot to protect my privacy using tools on my web browsers, but DNS is very hard to protect. Think of DNS like the phone book for the internet, and right now every time you look you an entry, anyone in your network can see what you are looking up. This is a gold mine for companies like Comcast to watch what websites you visit and sell that data.

> Alongside technologies like TLS 1.3 and encrypted SNI, DoH has the potential to provide tremendous privacy protections. But many Internet service providers and participants in the standardization process have expressed strong concerns about the development of the protocol. The UK Internet Service Providers Association even went so far as to call Mozilla an “Internet Villain” for its role in developing DoH.

I've considered bringing DNS into my house with [Pi-hole](https://pi-hole.net), but even better would be encrypted DNS requests.
september 2019
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