10434
Scientists shocked by Arctic permafrost thawing 70 years sooner than predicted | Environment | The Guardian
Climate news just seems to be going from bad to worse, and at the same time the likelihood of governments, companies, etc. doing anything about it seems less and less likely. I wouldn't rely on tech stopping these trends. Maybe it will help us deal with the consequences. 🤷‍♂️
june 2019
The Mystery of the Miserable Employees: How to Win in the Winner-Take-All Economy - The New York Times
This article connects the analytical approaches used in highly data-driven sports like baseball, with a quantitative approach to understanding what makes people successful in their jobs. This specifically dives into a large team at Microsoft where people expressed dissatisfaction with work-life balance. The exploration of instinctive reasons for this proved wrong. Through survey data they found some good reminders (emphasis added).

> One of their findings was that people who worked extremely long work weeks were not necessarily more effective than those who put in a more normal 40 to 50 hours. In particular, when managers put in lots of evening and weekend hours, their employees started matching the behavior and became less engaged in their jobs, according to surveys. **Another finding was that one of the strongest predictors of success for middle managers was that they held frequent one-on-one meetings with the people who reported directly to them.** Third: People who made lots of contacts across departments tended to have longer, better careers within the company. There was even an element of contagion, in that managers with broad networks passed their habits on to their employees.

The more interesting data came when they looked at data that quantified the teams experiences (emphasis added).

> The two kept iterating until something emerged in the data. People in Mr. Ostrum’s division were spending an awful lot of time in meetings: **an average of 27 hours a week.** That wasn’t so much more than the typical team at Microsoft. **But what really distinguished those teams with low satisfaction scores from the rest was that their meetings tended to include a lot of people — 10 or 20 bodies arrayed around a conference table coordinating plans, as opposed to two or three people brainstorming ideas.**
>
> The issue wasn’t that people had to fly to China or make late-night calls. People who had taken jobs requiring that sort of commitment seemed to accept these things as part of the deal. The issue was that their managers were clogging their schedules with overcrowded meetings, reducing available hours for tasks that rewarded more focused concentration — thinking deeply about trying to solve a problem.

I have my own bespoke system for tracking calendar analytics. I track a handful of dimensions on the data in addition to just frequency and scheduled v. unscheduled time. I track wether I scheduled the meeting or if someone else did, to get a sense of how much of my time I am directing. I also track special flags for meetings with just one other person, a one-on-one meeting, as well as a flag for large meetings with a lot of attendees. Most recently I've also started attaching an emoji to each event to gauge a qualitative rating of the meeting. I'm now using that data to both correlate my own level of excitement about various parts of my work as well as insure that I'm putting my most precious resource, time, towards my most important objectives.
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june 2019
Bob Lutz Talks Panel Gaps, Tesla, and Why Every Detail Matters
The two best cars I've ever owned are my current Tesla Model 3, and a BMW 540i Sport. I still have a deep affection for both of these brands. I love the electric-revolution of Tesla. I have a deep admiration for the engineering discipline and rigor of BMW. The build quality of a 5-series BMW is phenomenal, and I can attest that the Model 3 lives up to it in every way.
june 2019
Why do some people avoid news? Because they don’t trust us — or because they don’t think we add value to their lives? » Nieman Journalism Lab
I don't have any news apps on my phone, because they are all far too focused on taking my attention. My favorite way to get news? Regular email newsletters that give me a finite amount of content on a schedule I understand, in a medium I control. And don't make me click to your website with all the surveillance and ads. The Economist Espresso daily email (do not use the app!) is a great example of this done well.
june 2019
20 Rules For Making the Best Salads of Your Life | Bon Appétit
I should eat more salads, and would probably do that if they tasted more interesting. Good tips here.
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june 2019
Facebook reveals Libra, its momentous new crypto, to the world - Decrypt
Interesting for Facebook to be getting into this space and betting so big on it. It would be good if it validates cryptocurrencies, but I have no trust for Facebook to run such a system with my money. I’m also pretty suspicious about the involvement of all these other organizations.

> These collaborators, each of which pitched in $10 million for the privilege of joining the network, are the so-called “Founding Members” of the Libra Association, a Switzerland-based not-for-profit that will oversee the development of the Libra network. A Byzantine system of “governance”—with each node participating in regular votes on key proposals—is intended to hold them accountable.

What are they getting out of this? I'll wait and see. If it requires a Facebook account, I won't be using it.
june 2019
Nintendo Announces Dr. Mario World Coming to iOS July 10 – MacStories
I wish Nintendo would get more aggressive bringing their titles to other platforms. I would assume they are worried about canabilizing sales of their own hardware, but it feels like the upside of bringing their amazing collection of titles to other platforms would generate a lot of revenue and an even bigger fan following.
june 2019
API Platform: REST and GraphQL framework on top of Symfony and React
Easy framework to build REST and GraphQL API-driven projects
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june 2019
Samsung accidentally makes the case for not owning a smart TV - The Verge
I wonder if it really makes sense to put these TV's on the Internet. I pair all of my TV's with an Apple TV that gets regular updates. The Smart TV's seem to be a vector for malware and surveillance software more than anything else.
june 2019
Opinion | You Care More About Your Privacy Than You Think - The New York Times
People often refer to some studies that suggest that people associate no value to privacy. Here is one that shows that that isn't true. I do believe there is a significant point here and it’s why companies work very hard to hide away privacy matters. Take 3 minutes and watch this excerpt from [Steve Jobs on privacy](https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=39iKLwlUqBo). I love the new decision in iOS 13 that will actually show the specific location data before sharing, not just some abstract data, but the actual data that will be shared from you.
june 2019
Introducing Guardian Firewall for iOS - Guardian Firewall
This looks really interesting, and I’m glad that they have a straightforward privacy statement and a simple business model, pay for good and services. I whince though at it being a VPN service, just because of performance. When I've used VPN's I've always found it to make things notably slower, and less reliable. Maybe this will be different, and I don't know of a better way to build a solution like this, but that worries me. I love the ethos of the product though.
june 2019
ongoing by Tim Bray · Go Creeping In
I can echo this observation as well, [Go](http://golang.org) seems to be making slow but steady progress and winning over many engineers as they build solutions.
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june 2019
Peek Calendar
Cool, innovative approach to a calendar user experience. I like the event creation screen and using gesture based controls for setting metadata about an event. I think I'll give this a try, but I've noted many times that calendar apps seemed to often be designed for people with 3-5 things on their calendar each day, not 20-30. The difference in calendar density causes many UX models to break down.
june 2019
Why PagerDuty Still Changes Our Logo for Pride Month | PagerDuty
I like this article explaining the "why" for PagerDuty and supporting Pride Month with their logo.

> To highlight Pride at PagerDuty is to celebrate all people and to shine a light on those in the world who cannot simply be themselves. We change our logo for Pride Month each year because we want to show that we are a welcoming and safe space, and that we support all people.

🏳️‍🌈👏
june 2019
The Problem With “Content”   – On my Om
Over the years I worked with many journalists and nearly all of them bristled at the word content. One once argued with me that I should just go all the way and call it "data". People who exercise a craft, do that in the theme of that craft, not arbitrary buckets of bits like content.

> A photographer who says that he is creating “content” for his YouTube channel is nothing more than a marketer churning out fodder to fill the proverbial Internet airwaves with marketing noise.

I love how Om looks at his personal website. I feel similarly.

> Like in my apartment, on my blog, I am king. My first decree was to eschew any and all analytics. I don’t want to be driven by “views,” or what Google deems worthy of rank. I write what pleases me, not some algorithm. Walking away from quantification of my creativity was an act of taking back control.

I’m glad to see I’m in such great company having [removed analytics](https://www.thingelstad.com/2017/removed-google-analytics) from my website, and I also disable all link tracking on the [Weekly Thing](https://weekly.thingelstad.com).
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june 2019
Soulver 3 for Mac: The MacStories Review – MacStories
Soulver is one of those niche Mac and iOS apps that you don't really get the hang of at first, and then when you do you find it super handy. I like the changes in this new version, but I’m surprised they released it ahead of the iOS version being at parity. Especially with a changed file format.
june 2019
My personal journey from MIT to GPL | Drew DeVault’s Blog
I like the journey described here and it echos why I use [Creative Commons](https://creativecommons.org) licenses with a similar "[Share Alike](https://wiki.creativecommons.org/wiki/Share_Alike)" clause.
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june 2019
In Court, Facebook Blames Users for Destroying Right to Privacy
Curious how Facebook really thinks about your private data? Read this. Don't bother with the PR and Marketing copy, look at how the lawyers defend the company in court.
june 2019
Opinion | In Stores, Secret Bluetooth Surveillance Tracks Your Every Move - The New York Times
This is a good reason to be wary of installing retailer apps on your iPhone, it gives a hook to get all sorts of private information from you that just isn't available in a browser. I also think it should be required that Bluetooth beacons be visible and identified in stores. I think it’s fine to have them, but you should be upfront with your customer and let them know that they are there and specifically let them see where they are.
june 2019
Looking for a Job? America’s Listings Are Inscrutable - The Atlantic
The over-caffeinated job description is a bit of the sign of the times. I have a suspicion that in addition to not describing the role well, it also doesn't connect with candidates as well as people might think.
june 2019
242 Year Old Birkenstock is Not Interested in Being on Fashion's "Trendy Punch List" — The Fashion Law
I've owned Birkenstock's for as long as I can remember. Each pair last several years. I even get them re-corked sometimes. I love the ethos they are espousing here:

> “It was never about function for them, just logos,” Klaus Baumann, Birkenstock’s chief sales officer, speaking about Supreme, which regularly draws long lines of consumers outside of its store every week on Thursday when it “drops” new products, including collaborations. “These were not product people.”
>
> Birkenstock’s management is seemingly unimpressed by such antics.

"These were not product people." Love that. Via [Five Things on Friday #300](https://us8.campaign-archive.com/?u=a84512488c22cce34b03cbcaa&id=3574e85eaa).
june 2019
Meet the new Dropbox | Dropbox Blog
I stopped using Dropbox a couple years ago, and I’m glad I did. I just wanted to simplify and I could put everything on iCloud Drive. This announcement raises the age old question: is all software destined to become bloatware? 😕
june 2019
Introducing support for U2F security keys | 1Password
This might give me a reason to get a U2F key. 🔐
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june 2019
The New Wilderness (Idle Words)
I like how [Maciej Cegłowski](https://idlewords.com/about.htm) frames the privacy topic (and a number of other topics for that matter). I've wished that the Internet had a form of "zoning" in this regard. In everyday life we make a number of assumptions about our privacy informed by our surroundings. When in a restaurant or store, I don't assume I have any privacy. When in a park, I do assume I have privacy.

> Our discourse around privacy needs to expand to address foundational questions about the role of automation: To what extent is living in a surveillance-saturated world compatible with pluralism and democracy? What are the consequences of raising a generation of children whose every action feeds into a corporate database? What does it mean to be manipulated from an early age by machine learning algorithms that adaptively learn to shape our behavior?

It would be nice if you could understand your privacy situation based on your surroundings in the digital world.
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june 2019
Opinion | We Read 150 Privacy Policies. They Were an Incomprehensible Disaster. - The New York Times
This has some great visualization of various privacy policies. It's telling how companies that tend to have a pro-privacy bend like Craigslist and Duck Duck Go are readable in a couple minutes with high-school level education. Facebook requires 18 minutes and a college level education. CNN and Hulu require you to be a legal professional to understand them. Airbnb is in a world of its own.

> Airbnb’s privacy policy, on the other hand, is particularly inscrutable. It’s full of long, jargon-laden sentences that obscure Airbnb’s data practices and provides cover to use data in expansive ways. For example, here is how Airbnb justifies collecting users’ personal information. Vague language like “adequate performance” and “legitimate interest” allows for a wide range of interpretation, providing flexibility for Airbnb to defend its data practices in a lawsuit while making it harder for users to understand what is being done with their data.

This is where services such as [Terms of Service; Didn't Read](https://tosdr.org) should be able to help crowdsource these intentionally obfuscated documents and turn them into something that normal people can understand. However, these services, like many in the pro-privacy space, aren't exactly taking off like wildfire.
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june 2019
Regulating Big Tech makes them stronger, so they need competition instead - Open Voices
[Cory Doctorow](https://craphound.com) writing in The Economist about the unintended consequences of additional regulation of tech giants. Keep this in mind when you hear companies like Facebook start to say that they think privacy regulation is a good idea. There is a potential they see that as a great way to lock in their monopoly status for the long haul.
june 2019
The world in which IPv6 was a good design - apenwarr
Fun read about the evolution of the network stack to IPv4, the hacks put in place around it, and the dream of IPv6 versus the reality. 🤓
june 2019
Post Death Internet Service – WARREN ELLIS LTD
Services that extend beyond your death are an interesting area. A common one thought of is personal website hosting. The idea of queuing messages is an obvious one too.
june 2019
Bond - Mary Meeker's Internet Trends 2019
The annual tablet of data from Mary Meeker on the state of the Internet. *333 slides!* 😅
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june 2019
Maker Faire halts operations and lays off all staff | TechCrunch
This bums me out. [Make: Magazine](https://makezine.com) and Maker Faire's are really cool events. I subscribe to the magazine. I hope the organization finds a soft landing and can continue to operate in some way.
june 2019
I left the ad industry because our use of data tracking terrified me
Call to action on what to do to protect privacy online.

> Not to be outdone, another startup projected a map of San Francisco with a red line tracking a real, anonymous person throughout their day. He challenged us to infer what we could about her. She left the house at 7 a.m. Went to Starbucks. Went to a school. Went to a yoga studio. Went back to the school. She was a mother with at least one child, and we knew where she lived. We knew this because this woman’s cell phone was tracking her every move. As does every other cell phone, including the one in your pocket right now.

I like the four steps that are outlined to give people the control they deserve.
june 2019
Hands-On with iPadOS and iOS 13: Changes Big and Small – MacStories
Highlights of some of the changes coming in iPadOS. This is solid stuff for people that want to do more of their work on their iPad, like me. 🙌
june 2019
Salesforce is buying data visualization company Tableau for $15.7B in all-stock deal | TechCrunch
This is a big deal and a major get for Salesforce. A while back Salesforce tried to make their Wave offering a thing in this space. It never really got traction.
june 2019
iOS 13 cracks down on location permission settings - 9to5Mac
This looks like a great way to highlight for the user what they are about to share. 🙌
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june 2019
The IA Client – The Swiss Army Knife of Internet Archive | Internet Archive Blogs
Cool to see Internet Archive building a command line tool like this to help people automate collection of data to the archive. 🛠
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june 2019
The Making of a YouTube Radical - The New York Times
This is a pretty incredible, detailed walk-through of how following a series of videos on YouTube changed this individuals outlook. So much of this content is not visible to most people.

> Perhaps this shouldn’t be a surprise. Our political culture is now built largely on shapeshifting internet platforms, which have made flipping partisan allegiances as easy as changing hairstyles. It’s possible that vulnerable young men like Mr. Cain will drift away from radical groups as they grow up and find stability elsewhere. It’s also possible that this kind of whiplash polarization is here to stay as political factions gain and lose traction online.

I honestly tend to avoid YouTube. I've found the whole platform to be a bit of a mess.
june 2019
Exercise-Bike Maker Peloton Files Confidentially for IPO - WSJ
I’m a huge fan of our Peloton gear and the service. Seems like it would be a good investment!
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june 2019
In Conversation with Juan Porral and Gregory Haley | FOD NYC
Greg was one of my roommates in college and his passion for architecture and design has always been so front and center. Reading this interview with him it reminded me a lot of people that build software as well. Greg highlights that design brings people together and is relatable. There is a lot of technology that aspires to do the same thing. 😎
june 2019
Xcode - SwiftUI - Apple Developer
SwiftUI looks amazing and simple. 🕴
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june 2019
How to Organize Your Life With GTD (Step-By-Step Workflow Guide)
Good introduction and overview of GTD. I've been using GTD for 10+ years and plan on using it for another 10 and more.
june 2019
How Cooking Can Change Your Life - Michael Pollan - YouTube
Great, short talk from [Michael Pollan](https://michaelpollan.com) on the importance of the fundamental act of cooking food for ourselves and our families. Via [Patrick Rhone](https://www.patrickrhone.net/how-cooking-can-change-your-life-michael-pollan/) and [Swissmiss](https://www.swiss-miss.com/2019/06/in-defense-of-home-cooking.html)
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june 2019
An update on Sunday’s service disruption | Google Cloud Blog
When the biggest cloud providers in the world have issues it’s a good reminder on how hard it is to run technology platforms, at scale, continuously.

> In essence, the root cause of Sunday’s disruption was a configuration change that was intended for a small number of servers in a single region. The configuration was incorrectly applied to a larger number of servers across several neighboring regions, and it caused those regions to stop using more than half of their available network capacity.

Sounds similar to other big outages, unintended consequences of a change or accidental scoping of a change. These changes come from expert administrators, so the machines follow the direction. I don't think it'll be that long before we build some skepticism into our platforms to not always trust even an expert administrators direction if the scope of that change is large.
june 2019
Apple’s Audacity – Stratechery by Ben Thompson
Thompson's recap of the WWDC 2019 announcements is insightful. He gave a lot of attention to the new Sign In with Apple capability and the privacy components of it.

> This is the context for Sign In with Apple: developers can now let Apple handle identity instead of Facebook or Google. Furthermore, users creating accounts with Sign In with Apple have the option of using a unique email address per service, breaking that key link to their data profiles, wherever they are housed.

I've been using [Maskmail](https://www.maskmail.net) to create unique email addresses and one of the things that frustrates me is how many websites block services that allow you to generate random email addresses. One upside to Apple doing this is I don't see people trying to block them.
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june 2019
The Full List of Automation Triggers in Shortcuts for iOS 13 – MacStories
This is a pretty big power user feature coming to iOS. Being able to trigger a Shortcut on the events shown here will bring a whole new set of customization capabilities to Shortcuts. 👏
june 2019
Shopify Unveils First State of Commerce Report - MarketWatch
A variety of retail consumer behavior information collected by Shopify. Some interesting highlights in here.
june 2019
iOS 13: The MacStories Overview – MacStories
I really dig these improvements coming in iOS 13. Scheduling Shortcuts to run on a schedule opens up a whole bunch of new things that you can do on your phone. The photos changes look great. I don't use Reminders, I’m an OmniFocus user, but the improvements there will be welcome by many people. Good stuff! 👍
june 2019
watchOS 6: The MacStories Overview – MacStories
Good overview of new capabilities coming in watchOS 6. Looks like some good stuff.
june 2019
iPadOS: The MacStories Overview – MacStories
Solid overview of the capabilities coming in the newly named iPadOS!
june 2019
Announcing Snowflake on Google Cloud Platform | Google Cloud Blog
We have had amazing success with Snowflake and it’s great to see that it is now on all three of the major cloud providers!
june 2019
nextdns
This looks like a compelling DNS service.

> The first cloud-based private DNS service that gives you full control over what is allowed and what is blocked on the Internet.

I’m still leaning towards using [Pi-hole](https://pi-hole.net).
june 2019
An Exercise Program for the Fat Web
This may have convinced me to jump into [Pi-hole](https://pi-hole.net) and better protect privacy for my entire home network. I was using the [Eero Plus](https://eero.com/shop/eero-plus) service but I've found that to have some performance issues, and I no longer trust that it will be true to it’s mission now that they have been acquired.
june 2019
A People Map of the US
This is really cool and fun to play with.

> A People Map of the US, where city names are replaced by their most Wikipedia’ed resident: people born in, lived in, or connected to a place.

it’s very interesting to drill down to towns you know and see the names highlighted.
june 2019
Visualization: 2012–2019 US Electric Car Sales (This Is A Must See) | CleanTechnica
This visual of EV car sales over time is pretty amazing. It puts the importance of the Tesla Model 3 into perspective!
may 2019
What's New in Alfred 4
I use Launchbar but Alfred tempts me with some of it’s cool capabilities.
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may 2019
SR-71 Online - SR-71 Flight Manual
When I was a kid the SR-71 Blackbird was one of those amazing, nearly mythical things. How fun to be able to read the flight manual now!
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may 2019
PugSQL :: SQL is Extremely Good, Actually
Nice, [KISS](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/KISS_principle), approach to keeping your database interfaces simple in Python.
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may 2019
Chrome to limit full ad blocking extensions to enterprise users - 9to5Google
This is exactly why I will not use Chrome as my primary browser. It is a great browser, and every other browser is better because of the amazing job it did with Javascript performance. But they were the last to support [Do Not Track](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Do_Not_Track), and with this decision they are making it very clear that protecting your privacy is not aligned with their mission.
may 2019
Announcing Minnestar's Newest Board Members - Minnestar
I’m so happy to welcome these new members to the Minnestar board! 💚
may 2019
ongoing by Tim Bray · On SQS
Bray knows a lot about writing great software, and I like his rounded view on queues.

> The proportion of services I work on where queues are absolutely necessary rounds to 100%. And if you look at our customers, lots of them manage to get away without queues (good for them!) but a really huge number totally depend on them. And I don’t think that’s because the customers are stupid.

I've been on the wrong end of queues many times. It’s a massive problem when you have a production queue that is backed up and you have to somehow get the data off and moving safely. I've probably been dealing with queues for 25 years at this point. But all in, they have a very valid place in systems. Just like everything in software though, they are not magical. 🦄
may 2019
Introducing Mercury OS – UX Collective
Cool conceptual framework for a different way of thinking about an operating system and the user experience for it.
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may 2019
Rethinking Brand You
I enjoy Tom Peters writing on leadership and business. His "personal brand" message is often taken the wrong way.

> Yes. You give a shit, and it shows. You build your brand as a leader, not by making great speeches to thousands of people, but in conversation after conversation, one by one by one, making a small difference each time. That’s the best aspiration you can hope for, in most jobs, and probably the longest lasting.

Be authentic and genuine! 🤝
may 2019
OKRs from a development team’s perspective – ZAFU LABS
We've been adopting OKR's in our team at SPS and I think there are some substantial benefits from having it. This article highlights a level that I don't think would make a lot of sense. Tying spring backlog items to OKR's seems like an odd thing.

> Shouldn’t we be using the OKRs to drive coming up with ideas in the first place instead of just wedging them in afterwards?

Yes. That is how it should work.
may 2019
You got this. | Zeldman on Web & Interaction Design
I can totally relate to this post from Zeldman and his feelings around learning new technology.
may 2019
How to Move Beyond a Monolithic Data Lake to a Distributed Data Mesh
This is a very dense article, and has some interesting thoughts on getting leverage from data.

> So what is the answer to the failure modes and characteristics we discussed above? In my opinion a paradigm shift is necessary. A paradigm shift at the intersection of techniques that have been instrumental in building modern distributed architecture at scale; Techniques that the tech industry at large has adopted at an accelerated rate and that have created successful outcomes.
>
> I suggest that the next enterprise data platform architecture is in the convergence of Distributed Domain Driven Architecture, Self-serve Platform Design, and Product Thinking with Data.

I think I'd have to read this a couple of times along with some others to really grok it. 🤯
may 2019
Why CIOs Make The Perfect Corporate Board Members
I've been exploring board opportunities for a while and feel strongly that a CTO/CIO is of growing importance for boards. This piece hits it spot on.

> CIOs have a breadth and depth of understanding of their companies and industries that give them an exceptionally valuable ability to contribute to the broader boardroom agenda. Adept at business case building to justify their budgets they also naturally execute in a team-based environment with other executives. Digital and technology savvy, strategic and operational business aptitude, governance aware, team-oriented, risk versed, well rounded, deeper and broader than a CFO or CEO, CIOs need to be on every corporate board.

I expect that in coming years having a CTO/CIO on the board will be considered absolutely necessary.
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may 2019
How Data (and Some Breathtaking Soccer) Brought Liverpool to the Cusp of Glory - The New York Times
Good read for [Liverpool](https://www.liverpoolfc.com) fans coming into the [UEFA](https://www.uefa.com/uefachampionsleague/) Championship this weekend. It’s nice to see the data driven analysis made famous in [Moneyball](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moneyball) is thriving in soccer too! ⚽️🤓
may 2019
(Don't Fear) The Reaper
Next week Apple WWDC 2019 will likely begin the transition to an entirely new UI framework for macOS. This article does a good job putting that in context and looking at the last time that happened, when NeXT OPENSTEP was in the mix.

> In 2007, Apple got the chance for a complete do-over of Mac OS X with a modern architecture optimized for touchscreen devices with powerful GPUs, but with thermal, resource, and battery constraints. That do-over was, of course, iPhone OS. […]
>
> With macOS 10.15, UIKit is finally coming back to the Mac to serve as a top-tier native application development framework alongside AppKit. This is the start of Apple's next transition, and just like last time, it's almost unfathomably difficult to see how these two completely different architectures will cooperate and find common ground.

I think this will be a fun ride. 🎢
may 2019
CQRS and Event Sourcing Intro For Developers - Software House ASC
Detailed and well-written overview of this powerful architectural pattern.
may 2019
Available on MasterClass: "Aaron Franklin Teaches Texas-Style BBQ" — Tools and Toys
OMG this is so amazing and awesome! I [experienced the magic of Franklin Barbecue](https://micro.thingelstad.com/2019/04/03/full-fanboy-mode.html) and this series of classes with Aaron Franklin are exceedingly well done. I've also got a bit of a '[man crush](https://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=mancrush)' on Franklin. I'd love to hang out for a day of smoking BBQ with him. I'd even bring the beer! 😍🍻
may 2019
Interactive presentation software - Mentimeter
This looks like a solid tool

> Mentimeter is an easy-to-use presentation software used by more than 25 million people. With Mentimeter you can create fun and interactive presentations. We help you make your events, presentations, lectures, and workshops innovative and memorable.

Thanks [Paul Birkbeck](https://www.linkedin.com/in/paulbirkbeck/).
may 2019
H.264 is magic: a technical walkthrough of a remarkable technology.
Deep dive into the video compression method that is likely powering everything you watch.
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may 2019
Yes, This Photo from Everest Is Real | Outside Online
Summiting Everest is perhaps too popular now!
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may 2019
The Empty Promise of Data Moats – Andreessen Horowitz
Just having data doesn't mean anything if you don't have a use and have structured the data in a way to provide strategic benefit.

> None of this is to suggest data is pointless! But it does need more thoughtful consideration than leaping from “we have lots of data” to “therefore we have long-term defensibility”. Because data moats clearly don’t last (or automatically happen) through data collection alone, carefully thinking about the strategies that map onto the data journey can help you compete with — and more intentionally and proactively keep up with — a data advantage. It’s way better to plan for it than being blindsided when an asymptote or point of diminishing returns suddenly hits your company.

Having a data strategy is probably a good place to start.
may 2019
Khoi Vinh on How His Blog Amplified His Work and Career – Own Your Content
Great story from a well known blogger on the value that his personal website has brought to his career and work.
may 2019
Tesla: Insane or Clever – Monday Note
This article captures very well the way I think about Tesla. It’s **all** about the software.

> Turning to mainstream, legacy car companies, we have to ask what they know about software — and do they even care? The Engine Control Unit, the computer that controls ignition and fuel injection, comes from a vendor like Robert Bosch (my autokorrekt wants to write “ogre botch”); the gearbox controller from ZF (as in toothed gears, Zahnrad Fabrik) or Japan’s Aisin; and the entertainment/navigation module from Panasonic and others. And they all use bundled software. To conventional automakers, software is a sourced component, often from the lowest bidder, a hard-to-control annoyance.
>
> It’s a situation that’s reminiscent of the early days of cell phones. Motorola and Nokia had software because they had to, they even boasted about being good at it, only to be displaced by competitors who loved software, namely Google’s Android and Apple’s iOS.

I've told many friends that driving my Tesla Model 3 feels a lot using an early iPhone. The dashboard's emptiness harkens back to the ridicule of the first iPhone, that "it doesn't even have a keyboard!" Yeah, there is no speedometer in the middle of the steering wheel. The car can become completely different with a software update. Just today I got a new software push that changes dramatically some of the on screen displays.

It’s awesome to experience this, and wether other companies catch up to batteries and motors I suspect is a given. But catching up to the unified software platform that Tesla has is going to be exceedingly hard. For everyone that is, except other software companies. 😎
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may 2019
Kickstarter will not voluntarily recognize its employee union - The Verge
I didn’t realize that Kickstarter had so much internal turmoil.
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may 2019
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