THE GREAT IVY LEAGUE NUDE POSTURE PHOTO SCANDAL - NYTimes.com
The employee who found them was mystified. The athletic director at the time, Frank Ryan, a former Cleveland Browns quarterback new to Yale, was mystified. But after making some discreet inquiries, he found out what they were -- and took swift action to burn them. He called in a professional, a document-disposal expert, who initiated a two-step torching procedure. First, every single one of the many thousands of photographs was fed into a shredder, and then each of the shreds was fed to the flames, thereby insuring that not a single intact or recognizable image of the nude Yale students -- some of whom had gone on to assume positions of importance in government and society -- would survive.

There were several salacious stories circulating at Yale back in the 60's. Most common was the report that someone had broken into a photo lab in Poughkeepsie, N.Y., and stolen the negatives of that year's Vassar posture nudes, which were supposedly for sale on the Ivy League black market or available to the initiates of Skull and Bones. Little did I know how universal this myth was.
4 hours ago
Head of Pentagon’s secret ‘UFO’ office sought to make evidence public - The Washington Post
Elizondo, in an internal Pentagon memo requesting that the videos be cleared for public viewing, argued that the images could help educate pilots and improve aviation safety. But in interviews, he said his ultimate intention was to shed light on a little-known program Elizondo himself ran for seven years: a low-key Defense Department operation to collect and analyze reported UFO sightings.
14 hours ago
The CIA and the Cult of Intelligence - YouTube
The CIA and the Cult of Intelligence is a 1974 controversial non-fiction political book written by Victor Marchetti, a former special assistant to the Deputy Director of the CIA, and John D. Marks, a former officer of the U.S. Department of State
16 hours ago
Dutch designers convert algae into bioplastic for 3D printing
As well as algae, Klarenbeek and Dros have created biopolymers from other organic raw materials such as mycelium, potato starch and cocoa bean shells, which they use to 3D print objects.
17 hours ago
NASA’s plasma rocket making progress toward a 100-hour firing | Ars Technica
NASA recognizes this, too. So in 2015, the space agency awarded three different contracts for development of advanced propulsion systems. Of these, perhaps the most intriguing is a plasma-based rocket—which runs on Argon fuel, generates a plasma, excites it, and then pushes it out a nozzle at high speed. This solution has the potential to shorten the travel time between Earth and Mars to weeks, rather than months.
17 hours ago
NASA’s plasma rocket making progress toward a 100-hour firing | Ars Technica
NASA recognizes this, too. So in 2015, the space agency awarded three different contracts for development of advanced propulsion systems. Of these, perhaps the most intriguing is a plasma-based rocket—which runs on Argon fuel, generates a plasma, excites it, and then pushes it out a nozzle at high speed. This solution has the potential to shorten the travel time between Earth and Mars to weeks, rather than months.
17 hours ago
Dissecting the CIA's lies regarding MKULTRA • MuckRock
The above excerpt is mostly true, especially in the instances where the Agency used research foundations to provide “sterile grants” to institutions which would remain unaware of the Agency’s interest. However, “key individuals must qualify for top secret clearance and are made witting of Agency sponsorship. The system in effect ‘ buys a piece’ of the specialist in order to enlist his aid in pursuing the intelligence implications of his research.”
17 hours ago
Three-Day Work Week May Be Ideal For Those Over 40, Study Finds | Mental Floss
Their findings imply that, in order for employees over 40 to function at the highest possible capacity, a three-day (or 25 hour) work week may be best. However, researchers note that full time work—approximately 40 hours—seems to be less damaging than not working at all. Working more than 55 hours a week, meanwhile, may be the most damaging, taking a greater toll on cognitive functioning than total unemployment.
17 hours ago
What's wrong with eating people? | WIRED UK
Which brings us to the most infamous case of disease passed through human-to-human cannibalism by the Fore (pronounced ‘for-ay’) people of Papua New Guinea. Kuru is a disease tied to Fore funeral tradition, in which the family of the deceased ate their remains rather than burn or bury them. It was considered a deeply respectful practice, totally removed from the racist and fictitious accounts of fearsome cannibal savages that made for such good reading in colonial times. Kuru itself, however, is fearsome. It is savage. And it is a product of cannibalism.
19 hours ago
Bitcoins - Secured by NSA designed Encryption or Backdoored?
The integrity of Bitcoin depends on a hash function called SHA-256, which was designed by the NSA and published by the National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST).
19 hours ago
Cause of Skirball fire was ‘illegal cooking’ in homeless camp, LAFD says – Daily News
“At the time of the LAFD’s arrival there were no individuals present at the area of origin,” LAFD spokesman Peter Sanders said in the release.
yesterday
Saturn's Rings Alter Its Ionosphere
When Cassini traveled through the shadows of Saturn’s largest and brightest rings (the A and B rings), it measured a drastic drop in the amount of ionized plasma present, meaning the ionosphere got weaker when it was shaded. Though interesting, this is not entirely surprising. Ionospheres are produced when ultraviolet light from the Sun strips charged particles from atoms in the planet’s upper atmosphere; so, it makes sense that Saturn’s ionosphere is weaker when the rings block incoming sunlight.
yesterday
The Self-Help Guru Who Shaped Trump’s Worldview
In the president’s biography and business career, the role of positive thinking is hiding in plain sight. From childhood on, Trump worshipped in the temple of the movement’s prophet, Norman Vincent Peale: Manhattan’s Marble Collegiate Church. Indeed, Peale presided over Trump’s first wedding in 1977. Trump’s father was a die-hard adherent of Peale’s preachments, as is his daughter Ivanka, who wrote in her 2009 self-help tract, The Trump Card, that “perception is more important than reality” and you shouldn’t “go out of your way to correct a false assumption if it plays to your advantage.”
yesterday
Glowing Auras and ‘Black Money’: The Pentagon’s Mysterious U.F.O. Program - The New York Times
In the $600 billion annual Defense Department budgets, the $22 million spent on the Advanced Aerospace Threat Identification Program was almost impossible to find.

Which was how the Pentagon wanted it. For years, the program investigated reports of unidentified flying objects, according to Defense Department officials, interviews with program participants and records obtained by The New York Times. It was run by a military intelligence official, Luis Elizondo, on the fifth floor of the Pentagon’s C Ring, deep within the building’s maze.
yesterday
Assassins of the Image: the CIA as Cultural Gatekeeper
Who paid the ferryman? It was done by money laundering, which connected the CIA’s art milieu to the French Connection, their Congress of Cultural Freedom to Lucky Luciano, Jackson Pollock to the rate of cut in unadulterated coke and the end of the image to narcolepsy, imprisonment, necrosis. The cast of characters includes witting agents like Julius Fleischmann (among many things, on the board of Diaghilev’s Ballet Russe), unwitting properties like socialist Stephen Spender (who quit editing Encounter after he found out where the dough came from), Nelson Rockefeller (inevitably), and the usual nexus of front organizations, critics paid and unpaid (Operation Mockingbird), soft-power mind control, weird ideologues and the chronically available. In the end, perhaps all these revelations do is convince us of the CIA’s efficiency and its total control over all areas of life, which is itself a Company plot. But the failure of an art movement is always at least debatable, like the historical failure of counterespionage projects in Vietnam and Syria. Perhaps Motherwell, Pollack and Phoenix were all successes, erasing the difference between art and espionage and between espionage and life once and for all. Perhaps the art market was actually bilking the CIA and it is hysterical collectors who run the world’s underworlds, chasing rare pieces with a devotion far beyond that of salaried hacks killing time in safehouses in Beirut or Bratislava.
yesterday
Report: Caterpillar hired intelligence firm to spy on Rachel Corrie's family, leaked documents reveal - Europe - Haaretz.com
Leaked documents revealed that Caterpillar, a heavy machinery company which has Israel as a client, hired a private intelligence firm in the early 2000s to spy on the family of student activist Rachel Corrie, who was killed by a bulldozer while protesting on behalf of Palestinians, the Guardian reported Tuesday.
2 days ago
Trump Is Playing a Fascinating Game With NAFTA Negotiations | The Nation
This includes a way for countries to opt out of the destructive investor-state dispute settlement (ISDS) scheme, where companies can sue governments for lost expected profits from changed regulations. The US proposal wouldn’t eliminate ISDS, but would let countries leave the system, and would throw out the worst aspects of the process. Lighthizer also wants to strengthen “Buy America” procurement mandates; increase the “rule of origin” for automobiles, so 85 percent of a car is made in NAFTA countries and half in the United States; and initiate a mandatory sunset and review of NAFTA every five years.
2 days ago
Google, democracy and the truth about internet search | Technology | The Guardian
I contacted Google about its seemingly malfunctioning autocomplete suggestions and received the following response: “Our search results are a reflection of the content across the web. This means that sometimes unpleasant portrayals of sensitive subject matter online can affect what search results appear for a given query. These results don’t reflect Google’s own opinions or beliefs – as a company, we strongly value a diversity of perspectives, ideas and cultures.”
3 days ago
The great British Brexit robbery: how our democracy was hijacked | Technology | The Guardian
“That was before we became this dark, dystopian data company that gave the world Trump,” a former Cambridge Analytica employee who I’ll call Paul tells me. “It was back when we were still just a psychological warfare firm.” Was that really what you called it, I ask him. Psychological warfare? “Totally. That’s what it is. Psyops. Psychological operations – the same methods the military use to effect mass sentiment change. It’s what they mean by winning ‘hearts and minds’. We were just doing it to win elections in the kind of developing countries that don’t have many rules.”

Why would anyone want to intern with a psychological warfare firm, I ask him. And he looks at me like I am mad. “It was like working for MI6. Only it’s MI6 for hire. It was very posh, very English, run by an old Etonian and you got to do some really cool things. Fly all over the world. You were working with the president of Kenya or Ghana or wherever. It’s not like election campaigns in the west. You got to do all sorts of crazy shit.”
3 days ago
The Guy Who Digs up Lost Cities Buried at Sea
Water dredges (underwater suction devices) are used by the divers to remove thousand-year-old sediment. As per the Convention for the Protection of Underwater Cultural Heritage, artifacts are “usually” left on site but if they’re deemed at risk, they may be risen for their “safeguard, study and conservation.” At the Alexandria National Museum (a renovated 1929 Italian style mansion in Alexandria, Egypt), one can find Franck Goddio’s most important findings on permanent display for the public.
3 days ago
Democracy and the Machinations of Mind Control | by Anthony Barnett | NYR Daily | The New York Review of Books
In March, Farage was spotted going into the Ecuadorian Embassy in London, where WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange has taken refuge. As Farage left the embassy, a BuzzFeed News journalist asked what he was doing there. Farage replied that he could not remember. In an overview in May, Cadwalladr pieced together various ties between the Trump campaign, Nigel Farage, and Russian “influence” efforts (including the alleged leaking of hacked information to WikiLeaks). British democracy, she concluded, had been “hijacked”:
3 days ago
Any lawful device: Revisiting Carterfone on the eve of the Net Neutrality vote | Ars Technica
Nearly 50 years ago, the Federal Communications Commission issued one of the most important Orders in its history, a ruling that went unnoticed by most news sources at the time. It involved an application manufactured and distributed by one Mr. Thomas Carter of Texas. The "Carterfone" allowed users to attach a two-way radio transmitter/receiver to their telephone, extending its reach across sprawling Texas oil fields where managers and supervisors needed to stay in touch. Between 1955 and 1966, Carter's company sold about 3,500 of these apps around the United States and well beyond.
3 days ago
How colonial violence came home: the ugly truth of the first world war | News | The Guardian
Rhodes’ scramble for Africa’s gold fields helped trigger the second Boer war, during which the British, interning Afrikaner women and children, brought the term “concentration camp” into ordinary parlance. By the end of the war in 1902, it had become a “commonplace of history”, JA Hobson wrote, that “governments use national animosities, foreign wars and the glamour of empire-making in order to bemuse the popular mind and divert rising resentment against domestic abuses”.

With imperialism opening up a “panorama of vulgar pride and crude sensationalism”, ruling classes everywhere tried harder to “imperialise the nation”, as Arendt wrote. This project to “organise the nation for the looting of foreign territories and the permanent degradation of alien peoples” was quickly advanced through the newly established tabloid press. The Daily Mail, right from its inception in 1896, stoked vulgar pride in being white, British and superior to the brutish natives – just as it does today.
3 days ago
Researchers discover how cells remember infections decades later
A perplexing question in immunology has been, how do immune cells remember an infection or a vaccination so that they can spring into action decades later? Research led by scientists at the University of California, Berkeley, in collaboration with investigators at Emory University, has found an answer: A small pool of the same immune cells that responded to the original invasion remain alive for years, developing unique features that keep them primed and waiting for the same microbe to re-invade the body.
3 days ago
Clintons 'destroyed' Secret Service's integrity | Daily Mail Online
Referring to the Secret Service responsibility for investigating money counterfeiting, Byrne writes: 'How can a law enforcement agency maintain its integrity, say in policing counterfeiting, while admittedly having compromised integrity in the area of protection?'
3 days ago
[Report] | Legalize It All, by Dan Baum | Harper's Magazine
At the time, I was writing a book about the politics of drug prohibition. I started to ask Ehrlichman a series of earnest, wonky questions that he impatiently waved away. “You want to know what this was really all about?” he asked with the bluntness of a man who, after public disgrace and a stretch in federal prison, had little left to protect. “The Nixon campaign in 1968, and the Nixon White House after that, had two enemies: the antiwar left and black people. You understand what I’m saying? We knew we couldn’t make it illegal to be either against the war or black, but by getting the public to associate the hippies with marijuana and blacks with heroin, and then criminalizing both heavily, we could disrupt those communities. We could arrest their leaders, raid their homes, break up their meetings, and vilify them night after night on the evening news. Did we know we were lying about the drugs? Of course we did.”
3 days ago
One Bank Believes It Found The Identity Of Who Is "Propping Up The Bitcoin Market" | Zero Hedge
In any case, and without further ado, please meet the (rather boring) people who are propping up the Bitcoin market, at least according to Deutsche Bank.
3 days ago
INSURANCE: Hours After FBI Found Classified Hillary Emails on Weiner Laptop, Peter Strzok’s Wife Was Promoted to Director of SEC Enforcement | True Pundit
This case keeps getting worse for the FBI and embattled agent Peter Strzok, the lead investigator on the Clinton probe. His wife Melissa Hodgman was promoted to deputy director of SEC’s Enforcement Division literally hours after Strzok and FBI Deputy Director Andrew McCabe were debriefed about the Clinton emails found on Weiner’s computer.
3 days ago
The Man from Red Vienna | by Robert Kuttner | The New York Review of Books
The great prophet of how market forces taken to an extreme destroy both democracy and a functioning economy was not Karl Marx but Karl Polanyi. Marx expected the crisis of capitalism to end in universal worker revolt and communism. Polanyi, with nearly a century more history to draw on, appreciated that the greater likelihood was fascism.
3 days ago
The Second Klan | The Nation
The “second Klan” of the 1910s and ’20s—unlike the vigilante group that preceded it in the Reconstruction era or the racist terrorists who targeted the civil-rights movement in the 1950s and ’60s—operated largely in the open and with broad support from white society in general and white politicians in particular. Moving beyond the regional and racial boundaries of the South, this version of the Klan spread across the country, targeting a broader range of enemies: Asians and Latinos alongside African Americans, as well as large swaths of religious minorities like Catholics, Jews, and Mormons. At its peak, the second Klan claimed to have between 4 and 6 million members nationwide, although Gordon makes a persuasive case that this was “certainly an exaggeration.”
3 days ago
All of Richard Feynman’s physics lectures are now available free online
And even if you're a physics novice (like me), you can still marvel at the fantastic teaching and amazing science. Like Feynman said: “Physics is like sex: sure, it may give some practical results, but that's not why we do it.”
4 days ago
They Should’ve Done This Instead of Magical Mystery Tour | solobeatles
In 1967, the Beatles discussed starring in LORD OF THE RINGS. John wanted to play Gollum, mystic George was going to be Gandalf, Paul would be Frodo and Ringo would be Sam. To direct it, John contacted Stanley Kubrick (A Clockwork Orange, Dr. Strangelove, 2001). Tolkien himself nixed the idea, since he controlled the film rights, but it is fun to imagine what the film would have been like. The Beatles were notoriously impatient during film shoots, so doing a film with the slow-moving, meticulous Kubrick would have been one of the most fantastic films of the decade or a totally insane train wreck.
4 days ago
The “Death Tax” Cargo Cult
That didn’t used to be very controversial. Adam Smith and Thomas Jefferson were proponents of inheritance taxes, as were the nineteenth-century steel baron Andrew Carnegie and the right-wing economist Friedrich Hayek. For roughly two hundred years, outside a fringe of reactionary plutocrats, there was broad accord on the question of the estate tax. Even conservative philosophers and statesmen found it difficult to defend letting economic elites pass on large bequests to heirs unfettered.
4 days ago
The unlikely partnership between Big Oil and the White House | Center for Public Integrity
The office’s bias toward industry can be traced to its founding. Though OIRA was created in 1980, its roots date to the EPA’s formation in 1970. As a counterweight, President Richard Nixon established the National Industrial Pollution Control Council, an advisory committee within the Commerce Department made up entirely of industry executives.
4 days ago
Scientists find fungus with an appetite for plastic in rubbish dump - Agroforestry World
Aspergillus tubingensis is a fungus which ordinarily lives in the soil. In laboratory trials, the researchers found that it also grows on the surface of plastics. It secretes enzymes onto the surface of the plastic, and these break the chemical bonds between the plastic molecules, or polymers. Using advanced microscopy and spectroscopy techniques, the team found that the fungus also uses the physical strength of its mycelia – the network of root-like filaments grown by fungi – to help break apart the polymers. Even plastics which would otherwise persist in the environment for years can be broken down by A. tubingensis in a matter of weeks, the scientists say.
4 days ago
Lead poisoning from bullet fragments in wildlife carcasses threatens eagles | Colorado Springs Gazette, News
“Many hunters don’t realize that as much as 50 percent of a bullet may remain in the deer as fragments,” he said. “A sliver the size of a grain of rice is enough to kill a bald eagle in 72 hours.”
5 days ago
An octopus is the closest thing to an alien here on earth — Quartz
That’s because octopuses are the most complex animal with the most distant common ancestor to humans. There’s some uncertainty about which precise ancestor was most recently shared by octopuses and humans, but, Godfrey-Smith says, “It was probably an animal about the size of a leech or flatworm with neurons numbering perhaps in the thousands, but not more than that.”
5 days ago
Long-theorized new form of matter, excitonium, finally discovered
Excitons are a type of boson formed in a semiconductor. When an electron on the edge of a semiconductor's valence band gets excited, it can cross the band gap into the conduction band, which is empty. When it does, it leaves a "hole" in the valence band, which itself becomes a quasiparticle with a positive charge. The positively-charged hole and the negatively-charged electron are attracted to each other and together form a kind of boson known as an exciton.

Like other bosons, excitons have long been believed to have a "ground state," which was named excitonium and, until now, was largely theoretical.
5 days ago
All the Plenary's Men - YouTube
A person or group of people who satisfy Blackstone’s criterion for ultimate sovereign power—the power to commit crimes with impunity—can’t exist in a nation where the law reigns supreme. And yet here we are a decade after the financial crisis began in earnest, and not one TBTF bank executive has gone to jail.
5 days ago
Ancient penguins may have weighed more than 100 kilograms, been as tall as a human | Science | AAAS
Ancient penguins were huge. That’s what fossils of a newly described penguin species dubbed Kumimanu biceae suggest. Researchers estimate the bird weighed in at 101 kilograms, and—based on the length of a femur bone found near the eastern coast of New Zealand’s southern island—was about 1.77 meters tall, about the same as an average adult human. In contrast, today’s largest living penguin, the emperor penguin, is half as massive and shorter by half a meter. The new fossil isn’t the only known giant penguin—others were similar in size and the largest likely stood about 2 meters tall—but K. biceae is one of the oldest. The bird lived 55 million to 60 million years ago, just after the mass extinction that took out the dinosaurs, researchers report today in Nature Communications. That means these penguins became sizable soon after they became flightless divers. Once their body size wasn’t constrained by a need to be aerodynamic, they could grow to substantial dimensions. When the dinosaurs disappeared, large marine reptiles vanished, too, and that may have left the seas open for K. biceae to inhabit. So, why aren’t modern penguins as humongous? The disappearance of gigantic penguins coincides with the rise of seals and toothed whales, the researchers say, so there may have been competition for food and safe places to breed and rear young. But, exactly how these mammals pushed out the gigantic birds is still a mystery.
5 days ago
How Chaga Can Help In The Fight Against Cancer
It was the book "The Cancer Ward" by Alexander Solzhenitsyn, that gave the world a glimpse of what this mushroom can do to cancer patients. Because of this book, many medical researchers went to Siberia to check out the validity of its cancer claims. A medical team found out that although there was a lot of talk about cancer in this place, not even a single cancer patient was admitted in any of its hospitals. They also found out that the Russian peasants, in order to save money on coffee, were brewing Chaga mushrooms instead. Unwittingly, they were able to treat themselves for cancer by drinking this Chaga tea regularly.
5 days ago
A Diseased Body Politic
This reviewer finished "The Cancer Ward" with mixed and turbulent feelings. On the one hand I am thankful that I have had the opportunity to read a work that, in spite of its weaknesses, towers about the novels that glut our marketplace. On the other, I am sickened by the knowledge that it cannot be read in Russia and that the publication of this book, like that of "The First Circle," ignores the author's own urgently expressed prohibition. Solzhenitsyn has several times spoken of the "danger" of the appearance of his banned books abroad, and charged that the Soviet secret police has circulated them in order to incriminate him. In his most recent statement about "The Cancer Ward" Solzhenitsyn declared last April 21 that no foreign publishers had obtained the manuscript, or authorization to publish it, from him. He expressed concern that the translations would be spoiled because of haste in the competitive scramble to publish his book. "But beyond money," he said, "there is literature."
5 days ago
Was the Heated 2016 Democratic Primary Rigged for Debbie Wasserman Schultz?
Ballots not matching the number of voters has surfaced in other states. In Wisconsin, the issue happens frequently enough that there is a statute (7.51 (2)(e)) on how to handle it, and the solution might surprise you. If there are more ballots than voters, officials are instructed to randomly pull out and throw away ballots until the numbers match.
5 days ago
Missed the bitcoin boom? Five more baffling cryptocurrencies to blow your savings on | The Guardian
If you are worried you’ve missed out on making millions by betting on bitcoin, don’t worry: there will be plenty more bizarre, borderline-incomprehensible digital bubbles in the future, and their value is only going to go up (until it all comes crashing down, that is). Here are five assets each competing to be the next bitcoin.
5 days ago
Crime Wave: Vintage photos of when Chicago was a gangster’s paradise | Dangerous Minds
Gangsters and Grifters is a book of photographs compiled from the extensive crime archive of the Chicago Tribune. The book contains a collection of rarely seen photos of infamous gangsters, murderers, thieves, pickpockets, bandits, molls as well as the cops who brought them to justice from 1900-1950. These vintage glass-plate and acetate negatives captured many legendary moments in criminal history—from which this small selection has been culled.
5 days ago
This Guy Says He was Offered $200 to Have Sex With Jerry Sandusky in 1979 and 1980 as Part of a Child Sex Ring – Crossing Broad
Bucceroni thinks that Lynne Abraham – yes, the same Philadelphia DA who wrote that commentary about Savitz – prematurely and quietly concluded her independent investigation of Second Mile because it might, yep, turn up information about Savitz and the people he was connected to… including Ed Rendell, who is the main target of Bucceroni’s anger.
5 days ago
Howard Eskin asks Ed Rendell about Jerry Sandusky child-abuse case
Rendell went on to say: “Joe Paterno and I would talk three or four times a year. He would call me if he saw something in the papers that I was taking it on the chin, and I would call him about the team on occasion, and I wish Joe Paterno, the first time he heard that stuff, had called me, I would have said, ‘Joe, take it to the prosecutor’s office right now, because pedophiles are recidivists, they’re the ultimate recidivists, and you want to stop this guy before he hurts anybody else.' “Yeah, but didn’t the state police know? At one time ... “ Eskin said. “Those were the campus police,” Rendell said.
5 days ago
Ray Gricar mystery: State police to take over case of missing Centre County DA | PennLive.com
Though Gricar was declared legally dead in July 2011, there's been a renewed interest in his disappearance since the it became clear the DA played a role in deciding not to prosecute Jerry Sandusky in 1998 after a child sex abuse complaint was made against him.
5 days ago
Matt Lauer Wasn't the Only One with a Button Under His Desk at NBC | Architectural Digest
“You have to drill into the doorframe; you have to snake the wires into the doorframe and then snake them underneath his desk. It’s a pretty big job,” the electrician says. “It’s really noisy, and so to do something like this secretly is impossible. Unless you did it over the weekend or while the whole floor was under construction.” As the buttons were reportedly common at NBC, and not "Lauer-specific," they could have likely been all installed at once during a renovation.
5 days ago
Trump Ambassador Beat and ‘Kidnapped’ Woman in Watergate Cover-Up: Reports
In June 1972, King was an ex-FBI agent working as a security aide for the Committee to Re-elect the President, or CREEP, Nixon’s campaign arm. His duty on the week of the break-in was to protect—and keep a close eye on—Martha Mitchell, the talkative wife of Nixon’s campaign director and former attorney general John Mitchell, while the Mitchells were on a campaign swing in California.
5 days ago
New Book Alleges Walt Disney Was A Gay Pedophile | OC Weekly
Hollywood Babylon Strikes Again! further alleges that Disney owned a Los Angeles apartment in order to meet up with various rentboys, including a man named Ralph Ferguson who has gone on the record stating that he received $100 for sex with Disney.  And here's the real eyebrow-raiser: Author Porter also writes that Disney fell in love with  young star Bobby Driscoll, of Song of the South (1946) who also voiced Peter Pan.
5 days ago
U.S. State Dept. diplomat resigns in scathing letter, encourages others to 'follow me out the door'
The department’s position within the interagency has also diminished, as we have ceded to the Pentagon our authority to drive U.S. foreign policy, at the behest of the White House but to the detriment as a nation. The trench in this direction will accelerate further with the budget and staffing cuts you are championing. In these challenging global times we should be seeking to conduct more diplomacy with more resources, not less with less. Top career leadership in the Department has been gutted, leaving few empowered to make hard foreign policy decisions. With dozens of vacant positions and so many officials in acting capacities, it is little wonder we lack direction.
6 days ago
World's Largest Organism Is Dying
Also known as the trembling giant, Pando is a colony of quaking aspen that spans 106 acres (43 hectares) of south-central Utah. Because of an explosion of deer in the area, new sprouts from Pando are eaten before they have a chance to mature, and the venerable organism is at risk of dying out altogether.
6 days ago
Taming the Antislavery Revolution
But at home, in the northern states, Republicans confronted a Democratic Party that was, according to a number of recent historians, fundamentally proslavery. In this account, the revolutionary overthrow of slavery required not only the military defeat of the southern Confederacy but the political defeat of the northern Democrats.
6 days ago
Graham: Being A ‘Child Molester’ Is ‘Inconsistent’ With Being A Senator – Talking Points Memo
“The Senate has its own way of dealing with membership in the body,” Graham said. “There’ll be an Ethics Committee investigation, and if the Ethics Committee, in a bipartisan manner, supports the allegations of these women that he in fact is a child molester, then my view is, that’s inconsistent with being a member of the body.”
6 days ago
Henry Ford Plotted To Destroy Black, Jewish Jazz With Country Music
Henry Ford, the auto maker, put more money into promoting country music in the 1920s than anyone else. Ford was frightened by what he saw as the urban decadence of couples jazz dancing. In response he organized fiddling contests and promoted square dances across the country to encourage what he saw as the older, more wholesome forms of entertainment.
6 days ago
George Mason: Forgotten Founder, He Conceived the Bill of Rights | History | Smithsonian
In 1776, Mason, then 51, had been appointed to a committee charged with drafting a “Declaration of Rights” for Virginia. From the writings of English Enlightenment philosopher John Locke (1632-1704), Mason had come to a then-radical insight: that a republic had to begin with the formal, legally binding commitment that individuals had inalienable rights that were superior to any government.
6 days ago
Rome on the Hudson | by Jackson Lears | The New York Review of Books
In March 1917, Leon Trotsky returned to Russia from the Bronx, where he had been sojourning for just over two months after being deported from Spain. “I was leaving for Europe,” Trotsky recalled, “with the feeling of a man who has had only a peep into the foundry in which the fate of man is to be forged.” But what was the common fate that was being forged in New York? Devotees of the urban sublime did not address the question and only occasionally reflected on New York’s world-historical significance, beyond ritual celebration. One of those occasions was in 1902, when Harper’s Weekly traced the city’s ceaseless tumult to the nation’s newfound prosperity, which was centered in New York. Commerce pulsed through the streets as “an electrified current of financial strength that is charged with an energy unknown before in the field of human endeavor.” The “mighty force” astir beneath Gotham was money.
6 days ago
Media Matters boss paid former partner $850G 'blackmail' settlement | Fox News
Media Matters chief David Brock paid a former domestic partner $850,000 after being threatened with damaging information involving the organization’s donors and the IRS – a deal that Brock later characterized as a blackmail payment, according to legal documents obtained by FoxNews.com.
6 days ago
United Service Organizations - Wikipedia
The first national campaign chairman was Thomas Dewey, who raised $16 million in the first year. The second chairman was future senator Prescott Bush.[4] The USO was incorporated in New York on February 4,[1] with the first facility erected in DeRidder, Louisiana,1941.[5][6] More USO centers and clubs opened around the world as a “Home Away from Home” for GIs.[citation needed] The USO club was a place to go for dances and social events, for movies and music, for a quiet place to talk or write a letter home, or for a free cup of coffee and an egg.
6 days ago
Order of the British Empire - Wikipedia
The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire is a British order of chivalry, rewarding contributions to the arts and sciences, work with charitable and welfare organisations, and public service outside the Civil service.[2] It was established on 4 June 1917 by King George V, and comprises five classes across both civil and military divisions, the most senior two of which make the recipient either a knight if male or dame if female.[3] There is also the related British Empire Medal, whose recipients are affiliated with, but not members of, the order.
6 days ago
Order of St. Sylvester - Wikipedia
The Pontifical Equestrian Order of Saint Sylvester Pope and Martyr (Latin: Ordo Sancti Silvestri Papae, Italian: Ordine di San Silvestro Papa), sometimes referred to as the Sylvestrine Order, or the Pontifical Order of Pope Saint Sylvester, is one of five Orders of Knighthood awarded directly by the Pope as Supreme Pontiff and head of the Catholic Church and as the Head of State of Vatican City.
6 days ago
Order of St. Gregory the Great - Wikipedia
The Order of St. Gregory the Great is one of the five Orders of Knighthood of the Holy See. The honor is bestowed upon Roman Catholic men and women (and sometimes in rare cases to non-Catholics[2]) in recognition of their personal service to the Holy See and to the Roman Catholic Church, through their unusual labors, their support of the Holy See, and their excellent examples set forth in their communities and their countries.

The Order of St. Gregory the Great has four "classes" in civil and military divisions:[citation needed]

Knight/Dame Grand Cross of the First Class (GCSG)
Knight/Dame Commander with Star (KC*SG/DC*SG)
6 days ago
United Service Organizations - Bob Hope - Wikipedia
One of the generals said Hope was a first rate military target since he was worth a division; that that's about 15,000 men. Presumably the Nazis appreciated Hope's value, since they thrice bombed towns while the comic was there."[17]
6 days ago
Bob Hope USO Involvement - Wikipedia
While aboard the RMS Queen Mary when World War II began in September 1939, Hope volunteered to perform a special show for the passengers, during which he sang "Thanks for the Memory" with rewritten lyrics.[47] He performed his first USO show on May 6, 1941, at March Field in California,[48] and continued to travel and entertain troops for the rest of World War II, later during the Korean War, the Vietnam War, the third phase of the Lebanon Civil War, the latter years of the Iran–Iraq War, and the 1990–91 Persian Gulf War.[18] His USO career lasted a half-century during which he headlined 57 times.[18]

The tours were funded by the U.S. Department of Defense, Hope's television sponsors, and by NBC, the network that broadcast the television specials created after each tour from footage shot on location. However, the footage and shows were owned by Hope's own production company, which made them very lucrative ventures for him, as outlined by writer Richard Zoglin in his 2014 biography "Hope: Entertainer of the Century."
6 days ago
Bob Hope's Vietnam Christmas Tours | HistoryNet
The 1964 trip set the pace and the pattern for all of Bob Hope’s visits to American troops around the world for the next eight years. While the performers changed and the locations varied, Hope was always the star and began the shows by strutting on stage with his golf club in hand, firing off jokes tailored to each base. He always had the reigning Miss World and always tried to bring the troops the outstanding glamour star from back home. He started appearing onstage in military uniform shirts and jackets outlandishly decorated with patches, stripes, stars and insignias. And as the number of military personnel stationed in Vietnam grew each year, the tour’s length expanded too.
6 days ago
Palm Springs Past : Bob Hope - Graydon Carter, Spy Magazine
Catwalks connect various parts of the house. A Vietnamese manservant ushers the visitor in. "See them?" Hope says later as the man, a former helicopter pilot for the South Vietnamese Army, and his wife scamper over one of the catwalks. "[General] Westmoreland gave them to me."
6 days ago
Thanks For The Memories ... The Truth Has Set Me Free - The Memoirs of Bob Hope's and Henry Kissinger's Sex Slave
The media has scrupulously avoided this controversial and provocative issue, even though mind control atrocities directed against innocent children are the world's most terrible secret. Read Thanks for the Memories and decide for yourself. Knowledge is power, and the perpetrators of these crimes against humanity are exposed -- as mind control victims continue to tell their stories. Bob Hope's autobiography, by the way, is also called Thanks For the Memories, the name of his musical keynote. Imagine the confusion at bookstores when people try to order his book -- and they get Brice Taylor's memoirs instead.
6 days ago
ISIS Introduces New Currency
In regards to the conversion rate, Adam Raisman at SITE told Newsweek, "IS stated it’s based on the 'inherent' value of gold and silver, and named the various denominations.
6 days ago
Meet The Man Who Solved The Mysterious Cicada 3301 Puzzle
Cicada’s identity is one of the most hotly debated topics among people who try to solve the group’s now annual puzzles. Theories range from global banks that might be trying to set up new digital currencies to political think tanks to nefarious groups of hackers with anarchy on their minds. The most popular assumption, however, is a government intelligence agency like the CIA, NSA, and MI6 that may be trying to recruit talented cryptoanalysts like Eriksson–something Eriksson doesn’t think is likely.
6 days ago
RT explores remnants of ISIS quasi-state in liberated Syrian village (VIDEO) — RT World News
Coins minted under Islamic State are slowly becoming collector’s items among coin experts, as RT’s Murad Gazdiev found out in the village of Hatla, which was liberated from IS on Monday. Visiting shops in Hatla village, just east of the Euphrates River, the RT crew discovered copper and silver coinage until recently used in daily transactions. Shop prices were listed in dirhams instead of the Syrian pound used across the country, and residents of this village of Deir-ez Zor province could only use them to purchase locally-produced goods, which ranged from tools and clothes to packaged foods.

The dirham was introduced by IS leader Abu Bakr Al-Baghdadi who envisioned reinstating the ancient Islamic currency using gold, silver and copper coins that were minted by the treasury of the self-proclaimed caliphate. Currency served as a form of control inside IS-held territory, especially when it came to paying taxes. And those who couldn’t pay in money had to pay in goods. “Wheat? They took it from the people,” one of the locals told RT, adding that “they took it by force."
6 days ago
Red Cross and Vatican helped thousands of Nazis to escape | The Guardian
Gerald Steinacher, a research fellow at Harvard University, was given access to thousands of internal documents in the archives of the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC). The documents include Red Cross travel documents issued mistakenly to Nazis in the postwar chaos.

By comparing lists of wanted war criminals to travel documents, Steinacher says Britain and Canada alone inadvertently took in around 8,000 former Waffen-SS members in 1947, many on the basis of valid documents issued mistakenly.

The documents – which are discussed in Steinacher's book Nazis on the Run: How Hitler's henchmen fled justice – offer a significant insight into Vatican thinking, particularly, because its own archives beyond 1939 are still closed. The Vatican has consistently refused to comment.
6 days ago
The Nazi Connection to the John F. Kennedy Assassination by Mae Brussell
By the time the Gehlen Organization became part of the West German state, Gehlen already had his agent-in-place in the United States. He was Otto Albrecht von Bolschwing, who had been a captain in Heinrich Himmler’s dreaded SS and Adolph Eichmann's superior in Europe and Palestine. Von Bolschwing worked simultaneously for Dulles' OSS. When he entered the U.S. in February, 1954, he cleverly concealed his nazi past. He was to take over Gehlen's network not only in this country but in many corners of the globe. He became closely associated with the late Elmer Bobst of Warner-Lambert Pharmaceutical, a godfather of Richard Nixon's political career, which brought him inside Nixon's 1960 campaign for the presidency. In 1969 he showed up in California with a high-tech firm called TCI that held classified Defense Department contracts. His translator for German projects was Helene van Damme, Governor Ronald Reagan's appointments secretary. Von Damme is currently U.S. Ambassador to Austria, next door to the nazi's homeland.
6 days ago
Full Service by Scotty Bowers with Lionel Friedberg - review | Books | The Guardian
The most startling examples are "Eddy" and "Wally", aka the Duke and Duchess of Windsor, who Bowers says were introduced to him by mutual friends, including Cecil Beaton. Bowers's line is that Wallis and Edward were both essentially gay and that the reason for Edward abdicating the throne was that their marriage gave him the freedom he needed to satisfy his urges in private. During a visit to Hollywood, Bowers says he arranged all manner of pretty dark-haired girls for the duchess and boys for the duke, as well as offering his own body for the duke to do with what he liked.
6 days ago
Scotty Bowers' 'Full Service' names names from Hollywood Golden Age - latimes
The title is a not-so-subtle reference to the job that was Bowers' entree into his career as a sexual "fixer," pumping gas at the Richfield station at 5777 Hollywood Blvd., where he began to connect former Marine Corps pals and other acquaintances with Hollywood elite looking for secretive sexual encounters — gay and straight — in an era where the studio system and the mores of the day kept a lid on sexual activity and orientation.
6 days ago
Full Service by Scotty Bowers: review - Telegraph
Scotty worked the night shift at the gas station, and he turned the place into a drive-in brothel, complete with a trailer out back, where he introduced the stars to men and women between 18 and 25. (It features in James Ellroy’s novels, though Scotty doesn’t mention it – I don’t think he’s a big reader.) And he never charged a commission, he says, but did it purely out of joie de vivre. He naturally charged for his own services, though, as he had done since he was a boy, prostituting himself (“tricking” is his preferred term) to the Roman Catholic priests of Chicago.
6 days ago
Confessions of a Sex Escort to the Stars: Scotty Bowers’s Memoir, ‘Full Service’
It’s easy to get bogged down with the minutiae of Bowers’s stories, because they are so colorful and shocking. He recalls the weekend he spent with J. Edgar Hoover. According to Bowers, Hoover came to dinner dressed in full drag. “He was no beauty,” Bowers says, “even when he was dressed like a woman.” Bowers then proceeded to have a foursome with the FBI director.
6 days ago
Bob Hope, sex machine, ‘often cheated’ during his 69-year marriage | New York Post
Or was he? “Hope: Entertainer of the Century,’’ a new biography by Richard Zoglin out Nov. 4, not only casts doubt on whether Hope was ever legally married to the former Dolores DeFina (who died in 2011 at age 102) — it chronicles a long list of his rumored sexual dalliances, some of which went on for years.
6 days ago
Adnan Khashoggi: Billionaire Saudi Arabian’s ‘pleasure wife’ Jill Dodd opens up in new book
But things started to turn sour. I’ll never forget in August 1981 when Adnan came into my suite at midnight, set a box on the bedside table and kissed my forehead. I woke up and turned toward him. When he saw my face, he whispered: “Oh, I have the wrong room. Sorry, go back to sleep. Keep the gift.” Before I could respond, he was gone. My heart dropped. He had thought I was another girl.
6 days ago
Whatever happened to Adnan Khashoggi? | "From Brussels to Beirut"
Khashoggi, along the same lines as former Italian Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi, had an insatiable desire to procure beautiful young women; both for himself and for those he wanted to impress. It is reported that he used the services of a French madam called Mireille Griffon, who was ordered to provide girls between the ages of 18 to 24. She was also known on the Côte d’Azuras Madame Mimi. She groomed ladies for the elite, and Khashoggi offered ordered two or three girls at a time. This tactic often helped to seal the deal with whose business he sought.
6 days ago
Inside the Party Dungeon of One of History's Biggest Arms Dealers - VICE
An Economist report estimates that Khashoggi required around $250,000 a day to maintain his lifestyle. His friends included movie stars, world leaders, and European kings, and it was in this basement where those elements of his lifestyle converged. This was where his legendary parties took place, and it has remained more or less untouched since he left.
6 days ago
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