sechilds + book   41

Think OS
by Allen B. Downey Think OS is an introduction to Operating Systems for
programmers. In many computer science programs, Operating Systems is an advanced
topic. By the time students take it, they usually know how to program
in C, and they have probably taken a class in Computer
Architecture. Usually the goal of the class is to expose students to
the design and implementation of operating systems, with the implied
assumption that some of them will do research in this area, or write
part of an OS. I developed it for a class at Olin College called Software
Systems.
book 
july 2017 by sechilds
The mission of spreading the knowledge of innovators continues
Additional context on why we’re no longer selling books and videos on shop.oreilly.com.
book 
july 2017 by sechilds
O'Reilly's Decision and its DRM Implication
> On Wednesday, I got mail from Laura Baldwin, President of O'Reilly, announcing that "as of today, we are discontinuing fulfillment of individual book and video purchases on shop.oreilly.com. Books (both ebook and print) will still be available for sale via other digital and bricks-and-mortar retail channels...[and] of course, we will continue to publish books and videos..." So O'Reilly's not getting out of the book and video publishing business, it's just getting out of the business of selling them at retail. For details, check out Laura's blog entry,  this story at Publishers Weekly or these discussions at Slashdot or Hacker News.
>
> To me, the most interesting implication of this announcement is that O'Reilly's no-DRM policy apparently resonated little with the market. Other technical publishers I'm familiar with (e.g., Addison-Wesley, the Pragmatic Programmer, Artima) attempt to discourage illegal dissemination of copyrighted material (e.g., books in digital form) by at least stamping the buyer's name on each page. O'Reilly went the other way, trusting people who bought its goods not to give them to their friends or colleagues or to make them available on the Internet.
>
> I don't know what motivated that policy. Perhaps it was a belief that trusting buyers was the right thing to do. But I can't help but think they took into account the effect it would likely have on sales. After all, publishing is a business.
>
> Piracy is a double-edged sword. On the one hand, it means you receive no compensation for the benefit readers get from the work you put in. On the other hand, pirated books act as implicit marketing, expanding awareness of you and your book(s). They can also reach buyers who want to see the full product before making a purchasing decision or who wouldn't become aware of your book through conventional marketing efforts.
>
> My feeling is that most people who choose pirated books are unlikely to pay for them, even if that's the only way to get them. As such, I'm inclined to think the marketing effect of illegal copies exceeds the lost revenue. I have no data to back me up. Maybe it's just a rationalization to help me live with the knowledge that no matter what you do, there's no way you can prevent bootleg copies of your books from showing up on the Net.
video  book  data 
july 2017 by sechilds
At O’Reilly, the mission of spreading the knowledge of innovators continues.
Yesterday, we announced that O'Reilly is no longer selling books and videos on shop.oreilly.com. We heard from some of you that you're unhappy about
book 
july 2017 by sechilds
Monstrosity Superstar Styles
ravenamore: “ unpretty: “ unpretty: “ unpretty: “ punsbulletsandpointythings: “ unpretty: “today at goodwill i found a kirk/spock au where kirk is a lowly redshirt ” Okay no but this book. Do you know...
book 
july 2017 by sechilds
sciencefair
- The open source p2p desktop science library that puts users in control :microscope: :book:
book 
june 2017 by sechilds
Designing Data-Intensive Applications
> As software engineers, we need to build applications that are reliable, scalable and maintainable in the long run. We need to understand the range of available tools and their trade-offs. For that, we have to dig deeper than buzzwords.
>
> This book will help you navigate the diverse and fast-changing landscape of technologies for storing and processing data. We compare a broad variety of tools and approaches, so that you can see the strengths and weaknesses of each, and decide what’s best for your application.
book  data  database 
june 2017 by sechilds
Log-structured storage
> This morning I’m reading Designing data-intensive applications by Martin Kleppmann.
>
> I’m only a couple chapters in, but it’s already definitely the best thing about databases I’ve ever read. It’s doing an amazing job of
>
> introducing totally new-to-me concepts (like “log-structured storage”)
> explaining what terms like “ACID” mean in a rigorous and clear way (turns out that the “C” in ACID stands for “consistency”, but has nothing to do with either linearizability or “eventual consistency”, it’s actually about maintaining application-level invariants. It’s really helpful to know that there are actually 5 completely unrelated uses of the word “consistency” when talking about databases). He’s also very up front about “this word is used very inconsistently in practice, be careful!”
> explaining how the concepts in the book relate to real-world databases like PostgreSQL, MySQL, Redis, Cassandra, and many many more
> giving references (just the first chapter on storage engines has 65 amazing-looking references), if you want to learn more and go deeper

BOOK: http://dataintensive.net/
book  data  database 
june 2017 by sechilds
xcelab.net
Statistical Rethinking is an introduction to applied Bayesian data analysis, aimed at PhD students and researchers in the natural and social sciences. This audience has had some calculus and linear algebra, and one or two joyless undergraduate courses in statistics. I've been teaching applied statistics to this audience for about a decade now, and this book has evolved from that experience.

The book teaches generalized linear multilevel modeling (GLMMs) from a Bayesian perspective, relying on a simple logical interpretation of Bayesian probability and maximum entropy. The book covers the basics of regression through multilevel models, as well as touching on measurement error, missing data, and Gaussian process models for spatial and network autocorrelation.

This is not a traditional mathematical statistics book. Instead the approach is computational, using complete R code examples, aimed at developing skilled and skeptical scientists. Theory is explained through simulation exercises, using R code. And modeling examples are fully worked, with R code displayed within the main text. Mathematical depth is given in optional "overthinking" boxes throughout.
statistics  statistics:bayesian  book  R 
june 2017 by sechilds
Git for Humans
> Git’s model of version control makes it indispensable for collaborating on digital projects of all stripes. Get situated with Git as David Demaree guides you through the command-line workflow, the nuances of repositories and branches, the elements of a solid commit message, and more. Pick up common version-tracking tasks, along with advice on trickier scenarios. You’ll learn how to put Git to work for you—and work better with your team.
book  Git 
may 2017 by sechilds
A
> Opinion surveys are increasingly used to measure citizen response to governmental initiatives. Survey Research for Public Administration helps clarify the basics of survey research as they apply to public administration. Author David H. Folz organizes the book around the fundamental stages of the research process: planning, design, implementation, analysis, and presentation of data. Folz fills the book with practical illustrations and does not assume an extensive background in statistics. Thorough coverage of the use of computers in data analysis is provided, complete with illustrations of SPSS screens. This practical volume, Survey Research for Public Administration is integral for professionals and students in research methods, social work, sociology, and political science. “This book is succinct enough to be a quick source of reference and detailed enough ...
book  data  survey 
may 2017 by sechilds
The #LowerEd “So What?”
> This week I’ve been writing about questions that emerged from “Lower Ed”, starting with some critiques of the book. I discussed how I chose my case study, how I triangulated data, how I think about “public sociology“, and how contemporary social problems require some innovative methodological approaches. Next, I’d like to discuss the “so what” of “Lower Ed” as I imagine it.
>
> The “so what” question is foundational to social science research. There are tons of things we could study but the litmus test is if what we’re studying is relevant. For a long time I struggled with my “so what” question. It mattered because it mattered! It wasn’t until fairly late in the process that I realized my intuitive understanding of for-profit higher education was really about inequality.
>
> Having a clear “so what” shifts everything in the research process. For me, the “so what” is the whole point of sociology and I’m always really bored with sociology that doesn’t have a clear so what.
>
> As an example of the shift that happens, I’ll return again to my struggle with finding my own “so what”.
>
> There is a way to study for-profit colleges that says, “I’m studying them because they exist.” There is a lot of that just like there’s a lot of that kind of research about all kinds of things. Some of that work is very useful. From this we often get key statistics like trends in college-going. Or we might get some cool data point about where for-profits are physically located in cities. These are just examples but by and large this kind of research is very descriptive. We need descriptive statistics and analysis.
>
> But descriptive statistics isn’t analysis.
book  data  education 
may 2017 by sechilds
R for Data Science
> In this chapter, you will learn a consistent way to organise your data in R, an organisation called tidy data. Getting your data into this format requires some upfront work, but that work pays off in the long term. Once you have tidy data and the tidy tools provided by packages in the tidyverse, you will spend much less time munging data from one representation to another, allowing you to spend more time on the analytic questions at hand.
>
> This chapter will give you a practical introduction to tidy data and the accompanying tools in the tidyr package. If you’d like to learn more about the underlying theory, you might enjoy the Tidy Data paper published in the Journal of Statistical Software, http://www.jstatsoft.org/v59/i10/paper.
book  data  tidydata 
may 2017 by sechilds
Handwritten books
> I asked yesterday on Twitter if it was too weird to write a book that’s totally handwritten. A few people gave me really great examples of prior art, and I wanted to record them here so I don’t forget.
>
> One thing a lot of these have in common is – they use visual elements that aren’t just writing (comics, people, circuit diagrams, mathematical diagrams, illustrations of mountains, trees, weird colours).
>
> One of my favorite things about writing by hand is exactly this – if you want to include a diagram, you can just do it instantly!! You don’t need to fight with your typesetting system for days.
>
> Here are the examples I found. There’s a pretty wide range and I think they’re all really wonderful. Some of them are about math/computing/electronics, some aren’t.
book 
may 2017 by sechilds
or
Building Powerful Community Organizations: A Personal Guide to Creating Groups that Can Solve Problems and Change the World [Michael Jacoby Brown] on Amazon.com. *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. <div><div><div>Intended for individuals who want to start, strengthen, or revitalize a group to address a community issue
book 
may 2017 by sechilds
Python
> Python for Scientists and Engineers was the first book I wrote, and the one I still get queries about. It had been out of print for more than a year, but I could never get myself to update it, because it looked like too much work.
>
> Recently, I asked for help in updating it, and a few people volunteered. Thanks to these volunteers, the book is now free to read online (and will remain so).
>
> The book assumes you already know Python, or any other language. I feel there are too many resources for beginners, and not enough for intermediate/advanced programmers.
python  book 
may 2017 by sechilds
Python for Scientists and Engineers
> Python for Scientists and Engineers is now free to read online. The table of contents is below, but please read this important info before.
>
> Python for Scientists and Engineers was the first book I wrote, and the one I still get queries about. It was out of print for a long time, till now, and has been updated with help from the community.
>
> There are a few new sections, using the highly technical name of New Stuff. The biggest change has been to the Machine Learning section. I have added some of my best articles here, and some new stuff.
python  book 
may 2017 by sechilds
or
The Berlin Project [Gregory Benford] on Amazon.com. *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. New York Times</i> bestselling author Gregory Benford creates an alternate history about the creation of the atomic bomb that explores what could have happened if the bomb was ready to be used by June 6
book 
may 2017 by sechilds
or
Persepolis Rising (The Expanse) [James S. A. Corey] on Amazon.com. *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. <div><b>The seventh novel in James S. A. Corey's New York Times</i> bestselling Expanse series--now a major television series.</b></div><div><b> </b></div><div><div><div><div><b>The Expanse </b></div><div> Leviathan Wakes</i></div><div> Caliban's War</i></div><div> Abaddon's Gate</i></div><div> Cibola Burn</i></div><div> Nemesis Games</i></div></div><div> Babylon's Ashes</i></div><div> Persepolis Rising</i></div><div> </i></div><div><b>The Expanse Short Fiction </b></div><div> The Butcher of Anderson Station</i></div><div> Gods of Risk</i></div><div> The Churn</i></div></div><div> The Vital Abyss</i></div></div>
book 
may 2017 by sechilds
Agency: William Gibson: 9781101986936: Amazon.com: Books
Agency [William Gibson] on Amazon.com. *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. <b>In William Gibson's first novel since 2014's New York Times</i> bestselling The Peripheral</i>
book 
may 2017 by sechilds
Provenance: Ann Leckie: 9780316388672: Amazon.com: Books
Provenance [Ann Leckie] on Amazon.com. *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. <div><b>Following her record-breaking debut trilogy, Ann Leckie, winner of the Hugo, Nebula, Arthur C. Clarke and Locus Awards
book 
may 2017 by sechilds
Modeling data with functional programming, Part I
> This book is about programming. Not just any programming, but programming for data science and numerical systems. This type of programming usually starts as a mathematical modeling problem that needs to be translated into computer code. With functional programming, the same reasoning used for the mathematical model can be used for the software model. This not only reduces the impedance mismatch between model and code, it also makes code easier to understand, maintain, change, and reuse. Functional programming is the conceptual force that binds the these two models together. Most books that cover numerical and/or quantitative methods focus primarily on the mathematics of the model. Once this model is established the computational algorithms are presented without fanfare as imperative, step-by-step, algorithms. These detailed steps are designed for machines. It is often difficult to reason about the algorithm in a way that can meaningfully leverage the properties of the mathematical model. This is a shame because mathematical models are often quite beautiful and elegant yet are transformed into ugly and cumbersome software. This unfortunate outcome is exacerbated by the real world, which is messy: data does not always behave as desired; data sources change; computational power is not always as great as we wish; reporting and validation workflows complicate model implementations. Most theoretical books ignore the practical aspects of working in the field. The need for a theoretical and structured bridge from the quantitative methods to programming has grown as data science and the computational sciences become more pervasive.
book  data 
may 2017 by sechilds
Mining of Massive Datasets
> The book is based on Stanford Computer Science course CS246: Mining Massive Datasets (and CS345A: Data Mining).
>
> The book, like the course, is designed at the undergraduate computer science level with no formal prerequisites. To support deeper explorations, most of the chapters are supplemented with further reading references.
>
> The Mining of Massive Datasets book has been published by Cambridge University Press. You can get a 20% discount by applying the code MMDS20 at checkout.
>
> By agreement with the publisher, you can download the book for free from this page. Cambridge University Press does, however, retain copyright on the work, and we expect that you will obtain their permission and acknowledge our authorship if you republish parts or all of it.
>
> We welcome your feedback on the manuscript.
book  data 
may 2017 by sechilds
The Practice of Reproducible Research
> We are very happy to announce the launch of our open, online book The Practice of Reproducible Research, to be published in print by the University of California Press later this year. In short, this book is designed to demonstrate and teach how research in the data-intensive sciences can be made more reproducible. The book centres on a collection of 31 contributed case studies, in which experienced researchers provide examples of how they combined specific tools, ideas, and practices in order to improve the reproducibility of a real-world research project. These case studies are accompanied by a set of synthesis chapters that introduce and summarise best practices for data-intensive reproducible research.
book  data  research 
may 2017 by sechilds
On Marrying the Wrong Person
> Anyone we might marry could, of course, be a little bit wrong for us. We don’t expect bliss every day. We know that perfection is not on the cards. Nevertheless, there are couples who display such deep-seated incompatibility, such heightened rage and disappointment, that we have to conclude that something else is at play beyond the normal scratchiness: they appear to have married the wrong person. How do such errors happen, in our enlightened, knowledge-rich times? We can say straight off that they occur with appalling ease and regularity. Academic achievement and career success seem to provide no vaccines. Otherwise intelligent people daily and blithely make the move.
book 
february 2017 by sechilds
The (lack of a) case against Python 3
> A few days ago, well-known author and developer Zed Shaw wrote a blog post, “The Case Against Python 3.”   I have a huge amount of respect for Zed’s work, and his book (Learn Python the Hard Way) is one whose approach is similar to mine — so much so, that I often tell people who either are about to take my course to read it in preparation — and that people who want to practice more after finishing my course, should read it afterwards.
>
> It was thus disappointing for me to see Zed’s post about Python 3, with which I disagree.
python  book 
december 2016 by sechilds
High Performance Browser Networking
> Performance is a feature. This book provides a hands-on overview of what every web developer needs to know about the various types of networks (WiFi, 3G/4G), transport protocols (UDP, TCP, and TLS), application protocols (HTTP/1.1, HTTP/2), and APIs available in the browser (XHR, WebSocket, WebRTC, and more) to deliver the best—fast, reliable, and resilient—user experience.
book 
november 2016 by sechilds
A Pro-Nazi President, a Family Feeling the Effects
THE PLOT AGAINST AMERICA By Philip Roth 391 pages. Houghton Miflin. $29.

Throughout his career, Philip Roth has imagined alternate fates for characters very much like himself: bright, sensitive boys who grow up to become self-conscious, conflicted men, torn between duty and desire, a longing to belong and a rage to rebel -- artists or academics, estranged from their lower-middle-class Jewish roots and beset, at worst, by narcissistic worries, literary disappointments and problems with women.

In his provocative but lumpy new novel, "The Plot Against America," Mr. Roth tries to imagine an alternate fate for the United States with the highest possible stakes. What if, he asks, the flying ace Charles A. Lindbergh had defeated Franklin D. Roosevelt in the 1940 election, and what if Lindbergh (who in real life articulated anti-Semitic sentiments and isolationist politics) had instituted a pro-Nazi agenda?

Of course, this brand of historical fiction (or "counterfactual" history) is hardly new. In "It Can't Happen Here," Sinclair Lewis created a portrait of the United States as a fascist dictatorship under the rule of a New England demagogue. In "The Man in the High Castle," Philip K. Dick conjured up a Japanese- and-Nazi-occupied America in which slavery was legal again and Jews hid behind assumed names. In "SS-GB," Len Deighton imagined a Nazi-occupied Britain in which Churchill had been executed. And in "Fatherland," Robert Harris postulated a world in which the Nazis had won World War II and covered up the Holocaust.
book  science_fiction:alternative_history 
november 2016 by sechilds
Python for Data Analysis 2nd Edition
The #EarlyRelease of the 2e of Python for Data Analysis now available!! w/Pandas 1.0 etc http://shop.oreilly.com/product/0636920050896.do … @wesmckinn @OReillyMedia
book  pandas  Python 
november 2016 by sechilds
or
Grokking Algorithms: An illustrated guide for programmers and other curious people [Aditya Bhargava] on Amazon.com. *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. <div> <b>Summary</b> <p/> Grokking Algorithms</i> is a fully illustrated, friendly guide that teaches you how to apply common algorithms to the practical problems you face every day as a programmer. You'll start with sorting and searching and
book 
november 2016 by sechilds
Grokking Algorithms Is Out
> That’s the section on hash functions in both Introduction to Algorithms and Grokking Algorithms. I’m a visual learner, so my book has 400+ illustrations. Grokking Algorithms is also example-driven, so I give plenty of real-world examples in the book.
book 
november 2016 by sechilds
Data Wrangling with Python - O'Reilly Media
How do you take your data analysis skills beyond Excel to the next level? By learning just enough Python to get stuff done. This hands-on guide shows non-programmers like you how to process information that’s initially too messy or difficult to access. You don't need to know a thing about the Python programming language to get started.

Through various step-by-step exercises, you’ll learn how to acquire, clean, analyze, and present data efficiently. You’ll also discover how to automate your data process, schedule file- editing and clean-up tasks, process larger datasets, and create compelling stories with data you obtain.

Quickly learn basic Python syntax, data types, and language concepts
Work with both machine-readable and human-consumable data
Scrape websites and APIs to find a bounty of useful information
Clean and format data to eliminate duplicates and errors in your datasets
Learn when to standardize data and when to test and script data cleanup
Explore and analyze your datasets with new Python libraries and techniques
Use Python solutions to automate your entire data-wrangling process
book  Python  PyData  data:cleaning 
october 2016 by sechilds
Maybe not the “dumbest generation?”
> But if you write and publish a book called The Dumbest Generation. . . or, don’t trust anyone under 30 and happily make a name for yourself punching down, no wonder that students don’t see you as an honest broker for (in the words of his NYT column) “moral and worldly understanding,” let alone a subject for “emulation.”  Or, in the words of Erik Loomis, “What an Asshole.”
book  education 
may 2015 by sechilds
Why politicians and academics don't just say what they mean
> A Canadian, Pinker is considered one of the world's leading thinkers about language, and his forthcoming book, The Sense of Style, is a plea for clarity.
>
> He argues that while many scholars do groundbreaking work, and have important ideas, "their writing stinks."
>
> "There's just a lot of bad writing out there," he told me, and that has its consequences: "We pay for universities, we ought to be able to understand what comes out of them."
book 
april 2014 by sechilds
Computer Science from the Bottom Up
> Computer Science from the Bottom Up — A free, online book designed to teach computer science from the bottom end up. Topics covered include binary and binary logic, operating systems internals, toolchain fundamentals and system library fundamentals.
book  compsci 
april 2014 by sechilds
How to read (any book like) Capital in the Twenty-First Century?
> For truly serious books, I recommend the following.  Read it once, straight through, with a minimum of fuss.  If you get truly, totally stuck on some point, which the rest of the book depends upon, find somebody to ask.  Otherwise just keep on plowing straight through.
>
> Then write a review of the book.  Or jot down your notes, but in any case force yourself to take definite stances by putting words down on paper (or screen).
>
> Then reread the book carefully, because now you know what you are looking for.  Revise what you wrote.
book  economics 
april 2014 by sechilds
Why Did Copyright Shape Music and Books Differently Online?
> First, music is both easier to "produce" - that is, convert into easily accessible digital form - and "consume" since any browser or mobile device will hook you up to iTunes or YouTube. By contrast, creating an e-book is still a fair bit of work and you often need a specialized reader or app to consume the e-book.
>
> Second, Heald points to two cases that caused a split in how copyright was applied to the two media. In 2002, the case Random House v. Rosetta Books established that publishers need authorial permission to create e-books, particularly when reprinting older works. By contrast Boosey & Hawkes Music Publishers, Ltd. v. The Walt Disney Company found that publishers - in that case Disney - did not need a special license to convert music to a new form.
>
> Heald's belief is that reform of copyright laws would lead to a surge in publication of older e-books. Given that his data show a high availability of pre-1923 books in electronic form, he argues that the production and consumption barriers aren't really that significant. Publishers are in the business of selling books that people want to read and even if it's not true for all volumes, it's still likely that publishers would find literature that was worth the investment to produce.
video  book  data 
march 2014 by sechilds
The 101-Level Reader: Books to Help You Better Understand Your Biases and the Lived Experiences of People | ashe dryden
>Other People's Children: Cultural Conflict in the Classroom

>Quite regularly I'm asked about books that would be good to read to learn more about topics I discuss regularly, including intersectionality, feminism, womanism, and social justice. Thanks to the help of twitter and my ever-growing GoodReads list, here is a list for you. Many of the books can easily fit into more than one category, so may appear under multiple headings.

>The list is comprised of both 101-level and some more advanced books on these subjects. Much of this is from an American cultural perspective. I haven't personally read all of them, but most I haven't read are on my to read list. If I've missed something you think is fundamental, please let me know.

>There are quite a few other topics I'd like to cover here, but I am going to consider this post a living document. I'm also trying to figure out the best way to distill this information into a more easily consumable list.
book  gender  gender:tech  race:tech  from instapaper
december 2013 by sechilds
Test-Driven Web Development with Python
> Test-Driven Development with Python focuses on web development, with some coverage of JavaScript (inescapable for any web programmer). This book uses a concrete example—the development of a website, from scratch—to teach the TDD metholology, and how it applies to web programming, from the basics of database integration and javascript, going via browser-automation tools like Selenium, to advanced (and trendy) topics like NoSQL, websockets and Async programming.
javascript  python  book 
december 2013 by sechilds
Computational and Algorithmic Linear Algebra and n-Dimensional Geometry
> This is a sophomore level webbook on linear algebra and n-dimensional geometry with the aim of developing in college entering undergraduates skills in algorithms, computational methods, and mathematical modeling. It is written in a simple style with lots of examples so that students can read most of it on their own. Please see Chapter 0 for the table of contents of the whole book, preface explaining the philosophy of the book and what sets this book apart from other books on linear algebra, and glossary.
>
> Users are encouraged to read most of the book on the computer screen, and print only those portions that they need to look up several times on paper.
book 
november 2013 by sechilds

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