Rejected by A.A. | The New Republic
The applause rang out in the drab meeting hall across the river from David Hockenbury’s hometown of Louisville, Kentucky. David’s heart was pounding, and he felt his cheeks flush under the gaze of the large group gathered there on a spring night in 2016. via Pocket
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14 hours ago
How To Tell If You Are in an Essay on Adulthood - The Toast
Previously in this series. You love Don Draper, but at the same time you’re glad patriarchy is dead. It was a tough fight, and when you watch Don Draper you can see that he understands this too— both the love, and the complicated gladness. via Pocket
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15 hours ago
Elon Musk Is Working Too Hard
It does actually happen occasionally that a short seller will bet against the stock of a company and then do something to sabotage the company. There’s that guy who shorted the stock of Borussia Dortmund, the soccer team, and allegedly planted a bomb on the team’s bus. via Pocket
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15 hours ago
See No Evil
Software helps companies coordinate the supply chains that sustain global capitalism. How does the code work—and what does it conceal? Trawling a hotel minibar one night while on a work trip to Amsterdam, I found a piece of chocolate with an unusual name: Tony’s Chocolonely. via Pocket
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5 days ago
Online genealogy has created an unregulated forensic database for police - Science News - ABC News
DNA forensics was once reserved for official police labs, but thanks to the internet and a new wave of start-ups, those official barriers are wearing away. Commercial DNA testing services and crowdsourced genetic databases are helping people find long-lost relatives. via Pocket
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5 days ago
Doctors should avoid saying ‘cancer’ for minor lesions – study | Society | The Guardian
The word “cancer” should be dropped from some medical diagnoses because the term can scare people into invasive treatments they do not need, Australian and US researchers say. via Pocket
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5 days ago
Halfway to boiling: the city at 50C | Cities | The Guardian
Imagine a city at 50C (122F). The pavements are empty, the parks quiet, entire neighbourhoods appear uninhabited. Nobody with a choice ventures outside during daylight hours. via Pocket
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5 days ago
People aren't the worst – they are the only hope for the planet | Jeff Sparrow | Opinion | The Guardian
People are the worst. Variants of that sentiment appeared all over social media when Coles decided against phasing out plastic bags on the basis that shoppers needed “more time to make the transition”. via Pocket
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5 days ago
The 100-year capitalist experiment that keeps Appalachia poor, sick, and stuck on coal — Quartz
The first time Nick Mullins entered Deep Mine 26, a coal mine in southwestern Virginia, the irony hit him hard. Once, his ancestors had owned the coal-seamed cavern that he was now descending into, his trainee miner hard-hat secure. via Pocket
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10 days ago
Securing Web Sites Made Them Less Accessible – Eric’s Archived Thoughts
In the middle of last month (July 2018), I found myself staring at a projector screen, waiting once again to see if Wikipedia would load.  If I was lucky, the page started rendering 15-20 seconds after I sent the request. via Pocket
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10 days ago
“Lean In” Messages and the Illusion of Control
In a world in which men dominate leadership roles, should we focus on changing the systems and structures that favor men at women’s expense? Or should we emphasize the tactics individual women can use to get ahead? Our research explored this question. via Pocket
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12 days ago
Opinion | Motherhood in the Age of Fear - The New York Times
CHICAGO — I was on my way home from dropping my kids off at preschool when a police officer called to ask if I was aware there was an outstanding warrant for my arrest. What happened began over a year before on a cool March day in 2011, at the end of a visit with my parents in Virginia. via Pocket
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14 days ago
What do we do with the science of abusive men?
On May 18, W. French Anderson, known as the “father of gene therapy,” was released from prison on parole. via Pocket
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14 days ago
What Happened When I Tried Talking to Twitter Abusers – The Everywhereist
Trigger warning: please note that this is a blog post about online abuse, and includes screen caps of tweets sent to me. Graphic threats and abusive, hateful language toward women appear therein.   A few weeks ago, I gave a keynote talk at World Domination Summit in Portland. via Pocket
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17 days ago
It's time to face the truth about Anzus: it's worse than no treaty at all | Henry Reynolds | Opinion | The Guardian
The poster was launched by the Australian Embassy in Washington on 4 July, Independence Day. It attracted no attention at all locally which may have been a blessing. I only heard about it when reading the Australian edition of the Guardian online. It featured the faces of 15 men. via Pocket
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17 days ago
Why differential privacy is awesome - Ted is writing things
Are you following tech- or privacy-related news? If so, you might have heard about differential privacy. The concept is popular both in academic circles and inside tech companies. Both Apple or Google use differential privacy to collect data in a private way. via Pocket
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18 days ago
Liberal Europe isn’t dead yet. But its defenders face a long, hard struggle | Timothy Garton Ash | Opinion | The Guardian
One of the most memorable book titles in the English language is The Strange Death of Liberal England. via Pocket
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18 days ago
Australian jobs aren't becoming less secure
A common narrative nowadays is that standard, secure full-time work is a thing of the past thanks to increasing casual jobs, labour hire, temping and non-standard work contracts that side-step collective bargaining. The ACTU says insecure work has grown to “crisis levels”. via Pocket
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19 days ago
How a cabal of romance writers cashed in on Amazon Kindle Unlimited - The Verge
On June 4th, a group of lawyers shuffled into a federal court in Manhattan to argue over two trademark registrations. The day’s hearing was the culmination of months of internet drama — furious blog posts, Twitter hashtags, YouTube videos, claims of doxxing, and death threats. via Pocket
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19 days ago
Vladimir Putin’s Russia is a creaking ship. Don’t fall for the propaganda | Marie Mendras | Opinion | The Guardian
This summer, the World Cup created the illusion Russia was a well-run country with a contented population. But now the sports pageantry is over, Russians are back to the grey reality of everyday life, and a dire lack of prospects. via Pocket
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19 days ago
Monkey mafia steal your stuff, then sell it back for a cracker | New Scientist
Long-tailed macaques living near an Indonesian temple have figured out how to run a ransom racket on visiting tourists. via Pocket
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19 days ago
If you’re so smart, why aren’t you rich? Turns out it’s just chance. - MIT Technology Review
The distribution of wealth follows a well-known pattern sometimes called an 80:20 rule: 80 percent of the wealth is owned by 20 percent of the people. Indeed, a report last year concluded that just eight men had a total wealth equivalent to that of the world’s poorest 3.8 billion people. via Pocket
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21 days ago
'The discourse is unhinged': how the media gets AI alarmingly wrong | Technology | The Guardian
In June of last year, five researchers at Facebook’s Artificial Intelligence Research unit published an article showing how bots can simulate negotiation-like conversations. via Pocket
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21 days ago
The free speech panic: how the right concocted a crisis | News | The Guardian
Snowflake students have become the target of a new rightwing crusade. But exaggerated claims of censorship reveal a deeper anxiety at the core of modern conservatism. By Everyone knows free speech is under attack in the UK. via Pocket
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23 days ago
Sydney's population density is almost at tipping point
One of the best methods to measure density is to divide urban areas up into one square metre blocks and then only include blocks that people live in. This method has been used by the European Commission to produce a map called the Global Human Settlement Layer. via Pocket
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24 days ago
School uniform policy change gives NSW girls option of shorts or trousers - ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)
Girls attending public primary and secondary schools in NSW will be given the option of wearing shorts or trousers under new policy changes. via Pocket
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25 days ago
“Not technically beautiful, she has an engaging laugh”: 35 years of being described by men
For women in music, being described most of the time by men is just par for the course. I am sure you all saw the Twitter challenge that took off the other day – a request to women to “describe yourself like a male author would”, started by the writer Whitney Reynolds. via Pocket
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25 days ago
Israel’s Nation-State Bill and the European Ethnonationalist Wave
IN THE EARLY HOURS of Thursday morning, the Israeli Knesset passed a sweeping law reserving the right to self-determination exclusively for the Jews. via Pocket
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27 days ago
How Silicon Valley Fuels an Informal Caste System | WIRED
California is the future of the United States, goes the oft-cited cliché. What the US is doing now, Europe will be doing in five years, goes another. Given those truthy maxims, let’s examine the socioeconomics of the “City by the Bay” as a harbinger of what’s to come. via Pocket
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4 weeks ago
Dear Dana: Why Is My Wife Always Mad At Me? - Role Reboot
Dear Dana is a bi-weekly advice column for humans who engage in romantic relationships. via Pocket
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5 weeks ago
Leaving New York and Also Technology - The Awl
It’s hard to pinpoint the moment when New York and also technology started to feel like such a chore. via Pocket
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5 weeks ago
Polish charity gets huge phone bill thanks to stork - BBC News
According to official broadcaster Radio Poland, the environmental EcoLogic Group placed a tracker on the back of a white stork last year to track the bird's migratory habits. via Pocket
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6 weeks ago
Ellen Pao on the Perverse Incentives Helping Incels Thrive at Tech Companies | WIRED
The world has recently become more terrifyingly aware of incels, which, if you don’t already know, stands for “involuntary celibate. via Pocket
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7 weeks ago
Facebook’s retreat from the news has painful for publishers—including Slate.
The first months of Donald Trump’s presidency were a fraught and chaotic time in American politics. But in an age of shrinking newsrooms, early 2017 was a bright spot for online news publishers, especially those with some Facebook savvy. via Pocket
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7 weeks ago
The Only Traveling Advice I Will Ever Give You: The Inevitable Australian
I have only ever given one piece of universal advice, which is that if you are ever offered your choice of a beverage during a job interview, you should take it, because whether or not you are offered the job will never depend upon your not having imposed upon the office manager for getting you a c via Pocket
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7 weeks ago
Jason and the Psychonauts
She seemed to find this sad. But the truth is I don’t really mind it. Yes, I am constantly full of doubt, but it can be a positive force in my life. It means making fewer big mistakes, and more apologies when I do make them. Sometimes, though, I wonder what it would be like not to have my doubt. via Pocket
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7 weeks ago
Research: Women Ask for Raises as Often as Men, but Are Less Likely to Get Them
It’s a concrete fact that women earn less than men do. The true gender pay-gap is not known with certainty, but, when comparing equally qualified people doing the same job, most estimates by labor economists put it at 10% – 20%. The crucial question remains its cause. via Pocket
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7 weeks ago
Opinion | We Have a Crisis of Democracy, Not Manners - The New York Times
Last year, the white nationalist Richard Spencer was kicked out of his Virginia gym after another member confronted him and called him a Nazi. This incident did not generate a national round of hand-wringing about the death of tolerance, perhaps because most people tacitly agree that it’s O.K. via Pocket
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7 weeks ago
Pop Between Realities, Home in Time for Tea: Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell | Eruditorum Press
No, the point of faerie is what it’s always been: to introduce new and uncanny things into the world and make it a stranger place. And yes, maybe one of those things will prove revelatory and essential to changing the future. via Pocket
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7 weeks ago
RAICES can be effective with all that money it’s raising on Facebook.
As a rule, I am generally skeptical of viral fundraising campaigns. When everyone was dumping ice on each other’s heads on Facebook, I was the killjoy. via Pocket
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7 weeks ago
Do we need to update Godwin's Law about the probability of comparison to Nazis?
Does Godwin’s Law need to be updated? Suspended? Repealed? I get asked this question from time to time because I’m the guy who came up with it more than a quarter century ago. via Pocket
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7 weeks ago
A world of free movement would be $78 trillion richer
A HUNDRED-DOLLAR BILL is lying on the ground. An economist walks past it. A friend asks the economist: “Didn’t you see the money there?” The economist replies: “I thought I saw something, but I must have imagined it. If there had been $100 on the ground, someone would have picked it up. via Pocket
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7 weeks ago
Thermostats, Locks and Lights: Digital Tools of Domestic Abuse - The New York Times
SAN FRANCISCO — The people who called into the help hotlines and domestic violence shelters said they felt as if they were going crazy. One woman had turned on her air-conditioner, but said it then switched off without her touching it. via Pocket
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7 weeks ago
'I still feel mutilated': victims of disgraced gynaecologist Emil Gayed speak out | Australia news | The Guardian
Rhiannon Tull knew one thing when she was pregnant with her first child. She did not want her gynaecologist to be Dr Emil Shawky Gayed. via Pocket
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7 weeks ago
Electric Schlock: Did Stanley Milgram's Famous Obedience Experiments Prove Anything? - Pacific Standard
In October 1963, the Journal of Abnormal and Social Psychology published an article, blandly titled “Behavioral Study of Obedience,” by a 30-year-old Yale professor named Stanley Milgram. via Pocket
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7 weeks ago
The Lifespan of a Lie – Trust Issues – Medium
The most famous psychology study of all time was a sham. Why can’t we escape the Stanford Prison Experiment? via Pocket
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7 weeks ago
There’s no migration crisis - the crisis is political opportunism - The Globe and Mail
“Desperate times at our southern border call for desperate measures on the other side:” That was the very loud message from right-wing leaders in the United States and Europe this week. Their desperate measures shocked the world. via Pocket
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7 weeks ago
Home burial: bringing our baby’s body home from the hospital after he died.
Would you like to know what terrifies pediatric ICU nurses? What could be scarier than a Code Blue, more alarming than a dropping heart rate in an unborn baby, or more shocking than the crimson spill of blood in a trauma unit? A newly bereaved mother wrapping her dead son in blan via Pocket
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8 weeks ago
I lost both my sons to drugs – that's why I want to legalise them | Society | The Guardian
When two young adults died after taking ecstasy at the Mutiny music festival last month, Ray Lakeman understood the bereaved parents’ nightmare better than most. In 2014, his two sons had been exactly the same age – 18 and 20 – when they travelled together to Manchester for a football match. via Pocket
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8 weeks ago
A Dangerous Idea About The Festival Of Dangerous Ideas - New Matilda
It’s been a good year for the St James Ethics Centre. The Centre, which describes itself as “a unique centre for applied ethics, the only one its kind globally,” is based in Sydney. via Pocket
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8 weeks ago
Dying refugee moved from Nauru to Australia after intense campaign | Australia news | The Guardian
Ali*, a 63-year-old Afghan Hazara refugee and father of six, has advanced lung cancer. His prognosis is “dire”, doctors said, and he is not expected to live more than a few weeks or months. via Pocket
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8 weeks ago
Dear Conference Organizers: You’re Doing Chairs Wrong - Motherboard
There are lots of conversations about the lack of diversity in science and tech these days. via Pocket
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8 weeks ago
How Anna Delvey Tricked New York’s Party People
It started with money, as it so often does in New York. A crisp $100 bill slipped across the smooth surface of the mid-century-inspired concierge desk at 11 Howard, the sleek new boutique hotel in Soho. via Pocket
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9 weeks ago
Elon Musk and the Unnerving Influence of Twitter's Power Users | WIRED
Elon Musk is tweeting up a storm, and he’s loving every minute of it. With 21 million followers, Musk has emerged as one of the defining Twitter voices of 2018, someone who will happily and democratically engage with anybody who @s him. via Pocket
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9 weeks ago
NSW to change laws to allow child abuse survivors to sue churches | Australia news | The Guardian
Survivors of child sexual abuse will be able to sue churches and other institutions under changes to New South Wales’s civil litigation laws. via Pocket
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9 weeks ago
Facebook-WhatsApp turmoil takeaway: Mark Zuckerberg can’t be trusted.
The Wall Street Journal published a bombshell story on Tuesday about what reporters Kirsten Grind and Deepa Seetharaman call “the messy, expensive split between Facebook and WhatsApp’s founders.” The dishy piece makes for great reading. via Pocket
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10 weeks ago
Epimetheus and Prometheus
There was once a time when there were gods, but no mortal creatures. And when to these also came their destined time to be created, the gods moulded their forms within the earth, of a mixture made of earth and fire and all substances that are compounded with fire and earth. via Pocket
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10 weeks ago
Our Gently Aging Avatars
Every week or so someone I know on social media, but not in my daily life, updates their avatar, and suddenly they’re three or four years older than they were the day before. Some of these people I’ve known for 20 years, and it’s happened several times. via Pocket
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10 weeks ago
Citizenship for sale: how tycoons can go shopping for a new passport | World news | The Guardian
It’s the must-have accessory for every self-respecting 21st-century oligarch, and a good many mere multimillionaires: a second – and sometimes a third or even a fourth – passport. via Pocket
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10 weeks ago
When a Couch Is More Than a Couch - The New York Times
Were I healthy enough these days, I would be sipping a glass of free wine and running my hands over an exquisite accent pillow in an impossibly hip showroom called something like Space or Lust, while a sales assistant speaks to me of the virtues of aniline versus semi-aniline leather. via Pocket
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11 weeks ago
Why are all our dual citizens white?
New Zealand, Canada, and the United Kingdom. Especially the United Kingdom. These are the countries that define the dual citizenship crisis that claimed five more of our politicians this week. via Pocket
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11 weeks ago
Asian Americans Are the Least Likely Group in the U.S. to Be Promoted to Management
Asian Americans are the forgotten minority in the glass ceiling conversation. This was painfully obvious to us while reading the newly released diversity and inclusion report from a large Silicon Valley company: Its 19 pages never specifically address Asian Americans. via Pocket
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11 weeks ago
Ask Polly: ‘Should I Have a Baby?’
How did you decide you wanted kids? I’ll be 32 soon and am still on the fence. I’ve always been on the fence. Until a few years ago, I always said I didn’t want kids and that I even hated kids, but as I’ve gotten older I’ve realized that I actually like kids. via Pocket
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11 weeks ago
"When Breath Becomes Air" widow and "The Bright Hour" widower find love --- together - The Washington Post
SAN MATEO, Calif. — The literary pairing was inevitable. “When Breath Becomes Air,” Paul Kalanithi’s memoir of his final years as he faced lung cancer at age 37, was published posthumously, in 2016, to critical acclaim and commercial success. via Pocket
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11 weeks ago
Why is the DOS path character ""? – Larry Osterman's WebLog
Many, many months ago, Declan Eardly asked why the \ character was chosen as the path separator. The answer’s from before my time, but I do remember the original reasons. via Pocket
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12 weeks ago
How to survive Trump’s presidency without losing your mind.
This past week, journalists in America were struggling to comprehend two major stories: The first was that Donald Trump announced (via tweet) on Wednesday that any news that paints him in a negative light is, by definition, “fake news. via Pocket
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may 2018
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