Life with Two Kids | The New Yorker
A year ago, I only had one kid. And I am a-hundred-per-cent certain that my wife has only been pregnant once between then and now. But I look around my apartment these days, and there are babies everywhere. I'm only supposed to have two. We had Simon. And then Sara had one more after that. via Pocket
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5 days ago
Having Black Lives Matter in Australia can help strengthen Indigenous activism | Jack Latimore | Opinion | The Guardian
Malcolm Turnbull’s flat rejection of the Uluru statement hung absurdly and deplorably over our visitors’ time here The visit of the founders of Black Lives Matter to accept the Sydney peace prize should be leveraged by First Nations, indeed by all people of colour in Australia plus our via Pocket
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5 days ago
The incredible juggling act of multi-sport female athletes - ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)
Thought Ellyse Perry was the only multi-code athlete in women's sport? Think again. A string of athletes performing career juggling acts dominate women's sport across the board. Ellyse Perry is the definition of renowned. via Pocket
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6 days ago
The princess myth: Hilary Mantel on Diana | Books | The Guardian
Royal time should move slowly and by its own laws: creeping, like the flow of chrism from a jar. But 20 ordinary years have jog-trotted by, and it’s possible to have a grownup conversation with someone who wasn’t born when Diana died. Her widower is long remarried. via Pocket
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6 days ago
Ashamed to work in Silicon Valley: how techies became the new bankers | Technology | The Guardian
Wall Street has long been the industry people love to hate. But as big tech’s reputation plummets, suddenly a job at Facebook doesn’t seem so cool via Pocket
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7 days ago
Options vs. cash
Options vs. cash I often talk to startups that claim that their compensation package has a higher expected value than the equivalent package at a place like Facebook, Google, Twitter, or Snapchat. via Pocket
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8 days ago
A Cancer Conundrum: Too Many Drug Trials, Too Few Patients - The New York Times
With the arrival of two revolutionary treatment strategies, immunotherapy and personalized medicine, cancer researchers have found new hope — and a problem that is perhaps unprecedented in medical research. via Pocket
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10 days ago
Pando: Ellen Pao, Susan Fowler, Tracy Chou and reasons to hope
I’ve borderline obsessed about the Ellen Pao trial as I’ve watched the bloody bro summer of 2017 unfurl. What seemed so unsatisfying as the great gender lawsuit in Silicon Valley history years ago, now seems like a tectonic shift in hindsight. The “Anita Hill moment” as so many have said. via Pocket
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12 days ago
California has a climate problem, and its name is cars - Vox
In 2006, California passed its groundbreaking climate legislation AB 32, which put in place a target for greenhouse gas reductions and set in motion a cascade of regulations, subsidies, and performance standards that has continued unabated ever since. via Pocket
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12 days ago
Matildas star Sam Kerr is the Australian football player the rest of the world is talking about right now - ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)
Meet the Matildas — and Sam Kerr. If you haven't already familiarised yourselves with the team and its star striker, do so. You'll be hearing a lot more of them both. via Pocket
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12 days ago
The Other Reformation: How Martin Luther Changed Our Beer, Too : The Salt : NPR
On this day 500 years ago, an obscure Saxon monk launched a protest movement against the Catholic Church that would transform Europe. Martin Luther's Protestant Reformation changed not just the way Europeans lived, fought, worshipped, worked and created art but also how they ate and drank. via Pocket
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12 days ago
Hidden figures: How Silicon Valley keeps diversity data secret | Reveal
This story was originally published by Reveal from The Center for Investigative Reporting, a nonprofit news organization based in the San Francisco Bay Area. Learn more at revealnews.org and subscribe to the Reveal podcast, produced with PRX, at http://ift.tt/2946xau. via Pocket
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13 days ago
Yes, sexual harassment is an urbanist issue – Greater Greater Washington
Image by Michael licensed under Creative Commons. Sexual harassment and assault have been in the news a lot lately, following the firing of a few prominent figures like film executive Harvey Weinstein. via Pocket
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13 days ago
Anti-Fascist History and Politics, Explained | Teen Vogue
Images from the white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia — which resulted in injuries and deaths, including the death of 32-year-old Heather Heyer, who was protesting against the rally and was hit by a driver who rammed his car into a crowd — have been seared in our collective mind via Pocket
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13 days ago
302 Found
When I talk about the dangers of Nazism, people often assume I mean it as a term of abuse, as an excuse to attack people I disagree with. via Pocket
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13 days ago
The Complex History of the Genes That Color Our Skin - The Atlantic
Few human traits are more variable, more obvious, and more historically divisive than the color of our skin. And yet, for all its social and scientific importance, we know very little about how our genes influence its pigment. via Pocket
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17 days ago
Disability, Representation, and the X-Men | The Bias
My favorite thing about the X-Men is that many of them are disabled. Professor Xavier is one of the first characters most people think of when it comes to disability representation in comics and media, but what draws me to the X-Men is that disability rep doesn’t end with Xavier. via Pocket
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17 days ago
'Paying to stay safe': why women don't walk as much as men | Inequality | The Guardian
A study shows in most countries, women walk significantly fewer steps each day than men. Talia Shadwell hears from people all over the world saying the same thing: it’s down to personal safety, not laziness The Inequality Project is supported by About this content 04. via Pocket
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18 days ago
Jupiter's two strange auroras pulse to their own X-ray beat - Science News - ABC News
Scientists have detected a powerful X-ray aurora hotspot near Jupiter's south pole and it does not behave how they expected. Rather than pulsing in sync with the northern aurora, the southern hotspot runs to its own regular beat. via Pocket
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18 days ago
time.com
The women were making to-do lists: Call your neighbor and ask her for money. Open a campaign bank account. Get the party's voter file. Find the right doors in your district. Knock on them. via Pocket
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19 days ago
Stripe Atlas: Getting Your First 10 Customers
If you build it, they will do absolutely nothing. Entrepreneurs have to actively recruit their own few first customers. via Pocket
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19 days ago
Why the Human Brain Project Went Wrong--and How to Fix It - Scientific American
In Brief In 2013 the European Commission awarded neuroscientist Henry Markram $1.3 billion to pursue an audacious goal: building a simulation of the human brain. Markram's initiative, the Human Brain Project (HBP), is now in disarray. via Pocket
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19 days ago
Your brain does not process information and it is not a computer | Aeon Essays
No matter how hard they try, brain scientists and cognitive psychologists will never find a copy of Beethoven’s 5th Symphony in the brain – or copies of words, pictures, grammatical rules or any other kinds of environmental stimuli. The human brain isn’t really empty, of course. via Pocket
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20 days ago
Using a physical fitness app taught me the scary truth about why privacy settings are a feminist issue — Quartz
As a lifelong runner, I’ve become adept at predicting the best times, routes, and strategies to jog in cities while avoiding street harassers. via Pocket
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20 days ago
The superannuation myth: why it's a mistake to increase contributions to 12% of earnings
So much of the national conversation about superannuation simply assumes that “savings for retirement” is synonymous with “superannuation savings”. This is a big mistake. This mistake partly explains why we got into such a mess with excessively generous tax breaks for super. via Pocket
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20 days ago
Was Emily Brontё's Heathcliff black?
Did Emily Brontё envisage her most famous fictional protagonist, Heathcliff, as a black man? In recent years there has been extensive debate about whether Heathcliff is supposed to be black. via Pocket
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21 days ago
Why you should give money directly and unconditionally to homeless people
Who are you to judge what they do with that cash? Give your cash directly and unconditionally to homeless people. via Pocket
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22 days ago
This Isn’t Toxic Masculinity; It’s Sociopathic Baby-Men.
In any other year, Thursday’s New York Times article on Harvey Weinstein’s long history of sexual harassment might have felt like yet another story of a powerful man in Hollywood, abusing his power. via Pocket
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24 days ago
Why Tony Abbott’s climate snow job mistakes Australia for Europe | Greg Jericho | Australia news | The Guardian
It was well that Tony Abbott gave his climate change denying speech this week in London, because his thinking betrays a bizarre Euro-centric conservative outlook that constantly ignores multiple studies that show Australia’s economy will suffer greatly from climate change. via Pocket
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26 days ago
"As Long As It's Healthy"
This essay has been condensed. It can (and should) be read in its entirety in "Nasty Women: Feminism, Resistance, and Revolution in Trump's America," available today. When I was twenty-five, I was surrounded by women wanting babies. via Pocket
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26 days ago
The Bloody Legacy of Indian Partition | The New Yorker
In August, 1947, when, after three hundred years in India, the British finally left, the subcontinent was partitioned into two independent nation states: Hindu-majority India and Muslim-majority Pakistan. via Pocket
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29 days ago
Benefits and Risks of Cancer Screening Are Not Always Clear, Experts Say - The New York Times
Most people believe that finding cancer early is a certain way to save lives. But the reality of cancer screening is far more complicated. Studies suggest that some patients are enduring aggressive treatments for cancers that could have gone undetected for a lifetime without hurting them. via Pocket
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29 days ago
Pocket history: Why dresses hardly ever have pockets - ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)
Related Story: What's in a T-shirt? Designers, consumers use fashion to get political Related Story: This fashion designer makes clothes for dead bodies Related Story: Do you have your hats ready for the spring racing season? Do you find it frustrating that dresses and skirts hardly ever ha via Pocket
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29 days ago
'Volcanic': Evidence of Queen's involvement in the 1975 dismissal uncovered
Representatives of the British government flew to Australia in the lead-up to the 1975 dismissal of the Whitlam government to meet with the then governor-general, casting further doubt on the accepted narrative that London officials did not play an active role in Australia's most significant consti via Pocket
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4 weeks ago
The Seven Deadly Sins of AI Predictions - MIT Technology Review
We are surrounded by hysteria about the future of artificial intelligence and robotics—hysteria about how powerful they will become, how quickly, and what they will do to jobs. I recently saw a story in ­MarketWatch that said robots will take half of today’s jobs in 10 to 20 years. via Pocket
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4 weeks ago
How 'creatives' turned our cities into unaffordable playgrounds for the rich - RN - ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)
At the beginning of the 21st Century, author and academic Richard Florida predicted that the "creative classes" would become the driving force of economic growth in cities. via Pocket
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4 weeks ago
Marriage equality: yes, it’s about gender | Overland literary journal
When the ‘no’ campaign for the marriage equality postal survey launched its first television advertisement, the strategy was clear – it aimed to deliberately associate the ‘yes’ campaign with gender diversity, queer families, and the Safe Schools program. via Pocket
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4 weeks ago
'Just Ignore Them' Is Awful Advice for Dealing With Neo-Nazis - Rolling Stone
Since the white supremacist violence in Charlottesville earlier this month, the question of what to do about neo-Nazis, white nationalists and other racists marching in the streets has dominated news cycles. via Pocket
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4 weeks ago
Why small, local, organic farms aren’t the key to fixing our food system - The Washington Post
The food movement has a problem: It’s right about what’s wrong with our system, but wrong about how to fix it. But what is the “food movement?” I hear you asking. via Pocket
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4 weeks ago
Some advice for survivors and those writing about them – hypatia dot ca
It seems we’re about due for another round of Shitty Infosec Dude Gets Outed As A Predator. If you don’t know what I’m talking about, I’ll link to it when stories appear. via Pocket
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5 weeks ago
NSW introduces nation's first laws to recognise and revive Indigenous languages - ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)
Related Story: Should we use more Indigenous words in everyday speech? Related Story: Indigenous communities look at reviving Aboriginal languages Related Story: North Queensland Indigenous leaders lament the loss of traditional languages An Australian parliament has moved to recognise and via Pocket
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5 weeks ago
Verrender: Why the Aussie dollar is set for a dive - ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)
Related Story: How did the Aussie dollar get to 80 US cents — and can it stay there? Related Story: Onwards and upwards for the Aussie dollar … or maybe not There was a bittersweet irony in the news. via Pocket
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5 weeks ago
How McKinsey's Story Became Sheryl Sandberg's Statistic - and Why It Didn't Deserve To | HuffPost UK
Sometimes we can actually see a story get repeated so often it (falsely) acquires the status of research. I recently uncovered an example while trying to find the facts behind a claim in Sheryl Sandberg's Lean In. via Pocket
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5 weeks ago
Here's How Breitbart And Milo Smuggled White Nationalism Into The Mainstream
In August, after a white nationalist rally in Charlottesville ended in murder, Steve Bannon insisted that "there's no room in American society" for neo-Nazis, neo-Confederates, and the KKK. via Pocket
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5 weeks ago
Alice's Adventures in Numberland
[1]Lifting a Ton of Feathers: A Woman's Guide to Surviving in the Academic World, Paula J. Caplan, University of Toronto Press, 1993. via Pocket
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5 weeks ago
Why the Weinstein Sexual-Harassment Allegations Came Out Now
I have been having conversations about Harvey Weinstein’s history of sexual harassment for more than 17 years. via Pocket
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5 weeks ago
We Don't Do That Here
I have a handful of “magic” phrases that have made my professional career easier. Things like “you are not your code” and my preferred way to say no: “that doesn’t work for me.” These are tools in my interpersonal skills toolbox. via Pocket
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6 weeks ago
Stripe Atlas: Pitching Your Startup
Many outcomes important to startups are gated by pitching: the ability to quickly tell someone about your company and make them intrigued enough to want to learn more. You pitch your company every day to everyone—potential employees, investors, and prospects. via Pocket
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6 weeks ago
Snopes.com and the Search for Facts in a Post-Fact World | WIRED
It was early March, not yet two months into the Trump administration, and the new Not-Normal was setting in: It continued to be the administration’s position, as enunciated by Sean Spicer, that the inauguration had attracted the “largest audience ever”; barely a month had passed since Kellyann via Pocket
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6 weeks ago
The “parenting happiness gap” is real, new research confirms — Quartz
It’s an almost immutable fact: Regardless of what country you live in, and what stage of life you might be at, having kids makes you significantly less happy compared to people who don’t have kids. It’s called the parenting happiness gap. via Pocket
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6 weeks ago
How to Make Tech Interviews a Little Less Awful – Tech Diversity Files – Medium
Everything about the current interview process in tech is broken. via Pocket
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6 weeks ago
If you think women in tech is just a pipeline problem, you haven’t been paying attention
This article has been translated into Spanish at Matajuegos. Over a decade after I first learned to program, I still loved algorithms, but felt alienated and depressed by tech culture. via Pocket
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6 weeks ago
Genetic testing data reveals the irrationality of human behavior.
When, in 1996, French nun Mariannick Caniou found out she didn’t have Huntington’s disease, the lethal, degenerative genetic disorder, she fell into a depression. Throughout her life, she had been convinced that she would develop the illness that had killed her mother and grandmother. via Pocket
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7 weeks ago
Channel 7 cadet: What are your rights if you make an HR complaint at work? - ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)
Allegations have been levelled against the Seven Network over the treatment of a 27-year-old cadet journalist in Adelaide. Channel Seven has denied the allegations. via Pocket
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7 weeks ago
How “Good Intent” Undermines Diversity and Inclusion | The Bias
A lot of codes of conduct, community guidelines, and company values statements ask people to “assume good intent” when in conflict with other members. Positive statements like this feel more pleasant and welcoming than lists of banned behavior. via Pocket
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7 weeks ago
What not to say on your work email - ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)
Related Story: What are your legal rights if you make an HR complaint at work? Related Story: Channel 7 cadet dismissed soon after making harassment complaint As our work and personal lives become more electronically intertwined, high-profile examples, like that of Channel 7 cadet reporter via Pocket
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7 weeks ago
When Teamwork Doesn’t Work for Women - The New York Times
Economics remains a stubbornly male-dominated profession, a fact that members of the profession have struggled to understand. After all, if the marketplace of ideas is meant to ensure that the best ideas thrive, then this imbalance should arise only if men have better ideas than women. via Pocket
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7 weeks ago
Don't invite me to your straight wedding until we all have the right to marry - ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)
Related Story: Should you be worried if you haven't got your same-sex marriage postal survey yet? Related Story: I've sent back my same-sex marriage survey forms. via Pocket
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8 weeks ago
The Week My Husband Left And My House Was Burgled I Secured A Grant To Begin The Project That Became BRCA1 | HuffPost UK
The week of April Fools' Day of 1981 began badly. That Sunday night my husband told me he was leaving me. He had fallen in love with one of his graduate students, and they were headed back to the tropics the next day. I was completely devastated. It was totally unexpected. via Pocket
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8 weeks ago
The daddy dilemma: Why men face a ‘flexibility stigma’ at work - The Washington Post
When children were asked in a 1999 study whether they spend enough time with their parents, they had something interesting to say. They have quite enough time with their mothers, thank you. What they wanted was more time with their fathers. Not too much has changed in the past decade. via Pocket
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8 weeks ago
This Is What Happens to Ambition in Your 30s
What is this midlife crisis among the 30-year-olds I know?  Millennial women — at least those who reside in professional bubbles — seem to have it all. They are better educated, more prosperous, less encumbered by cultural expectations than any previous generation of women. via Pocket
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8 weeks ago
Push to end orphanage volunteering as World Challenge stops trips for students - ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)
The trend of Australian high school students going overseas to volunteer in an orphanage is about to come to an abrupt end. via Pocket
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9 weeks ago
Flying Coach Is So Cramped It Could Be a Death Trap
As airlines pack seats tighter than ever, the tests supposed to show that passengers can get out alive in a crash are woefully out of date. The FAA won’t make the results public, and a court warns there is “a plausible life-and-death safety concern.” via Pocket
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9 weeks ago
Bodega Isn’t Just Bad Branding, It’s Bad Business - Eater
“You know what this place needs,” I said to myself this morning, as I went into the little store around the corner where I buy my daily coffee, my breakfast sandwiches, my late-night potato chips, and my emergency tampons. via Pocket
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9 weeks ago
Standing for equality, as people and parents | Central Western Daily
With marriage equality postal survey forms to begin arriving in letterboxes this week, one couple has a simple message. Vote Yes. via Pocket
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9 weeks ago
How I failed to replicate an $86 million project in 1 line of code
When an experiment with existing open source technology just cherry-picks results to make it look goodThe Medium article “How I replicated an $86 million project in 57 lines of code” has been doing the rounds the last few days, describing how an automated license plate recognition (ALPR) system via Pocket
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9 weeks ago
Aung San Suu Kyi: damned by her silence | Observer profile | World news | The Guardian
Perhaps no one in the modern world has been so admired as a moral icon, then fallen so far in global estimation, as Aung San Suu Kyi. The Burmese democracy champion turned politician made her name as an implacable fighter for human rights. via Pocket
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9 weeks ago
The Rohingya tragedy and Aung San Suu Kyi.
A humanitarian disaster is developing on the Myanmar-Bangladesh border, where 164,000 Rohingya refugees have crossed in the past two weeks. via Pocket
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9 weeks ago
We should weep, but more importantly we should act to stop Indigenous suicides | Gerry Georgatos | Opinion | The Guardian
I have sat with hundreds of families in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities that have lost loved ones to suicide. They are crying out to be heard In the last few years I have written more than 300 articles on the suicide crisis and on suicide prevention. via Pocket
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9 weeks ago
Postal Survey: I'm Sorry Our Very Existence Is Now Up For Debate
Amy Coopes is a journalist, medical student and, along with her same-sex partner, the mother to a young son. Here, she writes about the effects of the marriage equality postal survey on her and her family. If there is one comfort in anything, it is that you won’t remember this time. via Pocket
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9 weeks ago
The truck that got away
Vandenberg was well known to police. His criminal record by 2009 included more than 60 driving offences stretching back to 1981 across Queensland, NSW and Victoria, including careless driving, negligent driving and high-range speeding offences. via Pocket
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9 weeks ago
When The Racist Is Someone You Know and Love… – Embrace Race – Medium
He smiled. I blinked. Fifteen years ago, I was moving into my third-floor condo in the French Quarter of New Orleans, Louisiana. I’d hired a neighborhood locksmith to re-key the locks. The place was the size of a postage stamp but it was all mine and it had an extraordinary view. via Pocket
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10 weeks ago
Should Australian schools force girls to wear skirts? - ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)
Girls around the country are being denied the option of wearing pants or shorts to school, as state governments refuse to require schools to offer an alternative to the dress. via Pocket
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10 weeks ago
What happened to the 'timeless' Post Office clock in Orange? - Curious Central West - ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)
Related Story: What is Curious Central West? Recently, the announcement that upgrade works would leave London without Big Ben's bong for four years caused a worldwide stir. via Pocket
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10 weeks ago
Is There Any Point to Protesting? | The New Yorker
That winter of 2003—you remember it, and so do I—the world assembled, arms linked, to protest the prospect of war in Iraq. What times those were, and how the passions swelled. via Pocket
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10 weeks ago
The Political Life is no Life at All
If you ask Greg Combet whether he misses his old political life, you get a slightly rueful response. ‘At times I miss it,’ he says. ‘But if I get carried away, I just remember what it was like. via Pocket
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10 weeks ago
Carry On Reviewing | shattersnipe: malcontent & rainbows
Sometimes, the most compelling books to read are also a fascinating mess, in equal parts frustrating and subversive. Rainbow Rowell’s Carry On is such a book, and even having finished it, I’m still not sure which I want more: to fling it against the wall or recommend it. Much like Catherynne M. via Pocket
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11 weeks ago
Don’t give money to the Red Cross. We need a new way.
In 2004, I was just starting my first full-time job in a Washington newsroom when disaster struck. It was on the other side of the world: an extraordinarily powerful earthquake in Sumatra, Indonesia, that triggered a tsunami across the Indian Ocean. via Pocket
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11 weeks ago
Cycling to work: major new study suggests health benefits are staggering
Research has consistently shown that people who are less physically active are both more likely to develop health problems like heart disease and type 2 diabetes, and to die younger. Yet there is increasing evidence that physical activity levels are on the decline. via Pocket
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11 weeks ago
Weedy seadragon sex caught on film for what's believed to be the first time - ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)
Related Story: Scientists track threatened weedy seadragons using marine 'facial recognition' Related Story: 'Near threatened' baby weedy sea dragons make debut at Melbourne Aquarium A former PE teacher has upstaged David Attenborough by filming a special moment in the secret sex lives of w via Pocket
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12 weeks ago
Why Sci-Fi Keeps Imagining the Subjugation of White People - The Atlantic
As much as the genre imagines the future, it also remixes the past—often by envisioning Western-style imperialism visited on the Western world. Science-fiction "contemplates possible futures." So says a new Smithsonian article, and it doesn't seem like a particularly controversial thesis. via Pocket
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12 weeks ago
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