po + technology   317

The Wetware Crisis: the Dead Sea effect : Bruce F. Webster
Mildly bogus metric since the argument is that good staff retention is rare.
However, it does reflect the reality that most orgs do not effectively promote IT staff so they have to move on.
business  management  programming  project.management  software  teams  communications  critique  technology  it  patterns  labor 
2 days ago by po
Opinion | Lean Out - The New York Times
Perhaps it’s only fair that, as women like Sheryl Sandberg rise to power, they pay the price for failure. But why is everyone so ready to forgive the man who really runs Facebook?
technology  feminism  leadership  surveillance.capitalism  corruption  zuckerberg  apologetics 
6 days ago by po
Against software development
Software grows until it exceeds our capacity to understand it.


A provocative manifesto that isn't just about software but about ethics in technology and business.
programming  culture  software.engineering  ethics  business  design  interesting  morality  philosophy  aesthetics  technology  business.ethics 
21 days ago by po
Discovery with Julia Evans
Bridget chats with Julia Evans (Stripe) about learning, service discovery, CAP theorem, distributed systems, remote work, zines, and more!
interview  computers  technology  blogs  interesting 
26 days ago by po
The Essentials for Covering Silicon Valley: Burner Phones and Doorbells - The New York Times
Reporting on secretive technology companies sometimes means finding people who don’t want to be found. Jack Nicas, who covers Apple, relies on some old-school methods.
journalism  privacy  secrecy  tools  investigative.journalism  techniques  technology 
26 days ago by po
Should you learn C to “learn how the computer works”?
tl;dr: "Learn C to learn _more_ about how computers work"

The ironic thing about C in 2018 is that the language pedants rule C and their memorized catalogs of undefined behavior, compiler quirks, and huge yawning chasms of security deathtraps.
Pity C11 came so late to bounds checking and deprecating gets(). (They should have deprecated more, imo.)
clang  programming  philosophy  learning  computers  technology 
9 weeks ago by po
Google is losing users’ trust.

A key feature of these episodes is that management rarely takes the blame: It’s usually laid at the feet of some anonymous engineer moving fast and breaking things. Maybe it’s just a coincidence that these changes consistently err in the direction of increasing “user engagement” and never make your experience more private.

What’s new here, and is a very recent development indeed, is that we’re finally starting to see that this approach has costs. For example, it now seems like Facebook executives spend an awful lot of time answering questions in front of Congress. In 2017, when Facebook announced it had handed more than 80 million user profiles to the sketchy election strategy firm Cambridge Analytica, Facebook received surprisingly little sympathy and a notable stock drop. Losing the trust of your users, we’re learning, does not immediately make them flee your business. But it does matter. It’s just that the consequences are cumulative, like spending too much time in the sun.

It’s this background that makes Google’s recent changes to Chrome so surprising. Google is the one major Silicon Valley firm that has avoided much of the tech backlash that’s spattering its peers. While the idea that Google is doing better than those companies might seem strange—Google is one of the biggest data collectors in the world, after all—I would argue that to a large extent, this is because Google has invested massively building user trust.
chrome  google  privacy  technology  shifting.baseline  erosion 
9 weeks ago by po
The Tech Skills That Earn The Most Money In 2017
This is such a wrongheaded list.
Some of these keywords are not highly correlated to specific jobs.
So manager salaries are probably being included with ABAP.

What is even more sad about lists like these is that knowing the technology doesn't really make you that effective.
Especially tools like Cassandra or languages like ABAP.
I know a dozen fools who have Cassandra on their resumes who have barely passable CQL and I'm not sure I would trust them to write a range report that wouldn't blow all caches and indexes.
To think they command ~123K salaries is absurd.
And with ABAP it's a distorted average I'm sure.
An FI specialist is likely paid 2-3x what MM module specialist is paid.
They do at least acknowledge that the financial sector is likely to be the most highly compensated.
buzzwords  jobs  labor  technology  hiring  keywords  lists 
september 2018 by po
Metrics: not the observability droids you're looking for - Honeycomb

When you think about useful fields you might want to break down or group by…surprise, surprise: all of the most useful fields are usually high-cardinality fields, because they do the best job of uniquely identifying your requests. Consider: uuid, app name, group name, shopping cart id, unique request id, build id. All incredibly, unbelievably useful. All very high-cardinality.

And yet you can’t group by them in typical time series databases or metrics stores. Grouping is typically done using tags, which have a hard upper limit on them.


And of course this amazing quote:
Nines don’t matter if users aren’t happy.
observability  technology  monitoring  awareness  interesting  databases  high.cardinality  quotes 
august 2018 by po
“Perhaps it is simpler to say that Intel…was disrupted”
This is completely unsurprising and a re-telling of a lot of 3rd-system-onward inertia.
(3rd system being the "getting it right" phase where mistakes from 1st system, the discovery, 2nd system, the wishlist, get worked out.)
By the time the 3rd system has been worked out, the firm is looking to optimize and economize.
Economization and optimization are not fertile for novelty and innovation except as it serves as a cost-offset. This may include minor features, but generally nobody wants to mess with a cash cow.
Intel's vertical dominance, like Microsoft's, caused it to miss major trends.
It's possible for a larger firm to maintain a forward thinking dominance but it's rare.
In most cases, the organizational friction makes it harder to make changes to grow market share.
It's easier to just abandon a market.
Take, for example, the ipod.
Apple wasn't done with music, obviously, look at their weirdly timed attempt at a music social media platform: ping. (which nobody seems to remember when touting apple's supposed amazingness)
But apple killed the ipod and left the music market empty.
Microsoft, weirdly, managed to get Zune into a good place with Toshiba before outright abandoning personal music players entirely as well.
Now it's just a niche - albeit a very profitable one for several smaller companies.
At some point, some markets are too small for large firms to enter or maintain.
And because they don't see any incentive to grow any particularly small market, they will always need to acquire their way into those segments.
intel  history  failure  disruption  technology  innovation  vendor.lock.in  bungles  soc  not.invented.here  exclusivity 
july 2018 by po
We need to reinvent the regulation of technology — Quartz
A key reason that our regulatory tools are growing so useless is that we have not devoted the same funding, energy, or time to updating the way we develop regulation as we have to developing new technologies.

Gosh-wow, that wouldn't have anything to do with the technology industry actively sabotaging regulation would it? I wonder why regulatory capture is a concern?

More seriously, this is an important topic but asking the predators to police themselves hasn't really worked out well since the prey aren't invited to the table.
nonsense  technology  government  law  regulatory.capture 
july 2018 by po
The XY Problem
This reminds me of ESR's hostile approach to questions where the onus is on the interlocutor to know how best to ask a question.
Rick Moen pointed out at one point that the people who most need to read this type of thing are the least likely to read it.
Also: stop trying to optimize for the answerer. Anyone with any experience in pedagogy knows that's silly and a suboptimal way of encouraging participation.
communication  rhetoric  help  instruction  education  language  assistance  culture  technology  opensores  fallacies 
june 2018 by po
12 Things Everyone Should Understand About Tech – Humane Tech – Medium
9. Most big tech companies make money in just one of three ways.
It’s important to understand how tech companies make money if you want to understand why tech works the way that it does.

Advertising: Google and Facebook make nearly all of their money from selling information about you to advertisers. Almost every product they create is designed to extract as much information from you as possible, so that it can be used to create a more detailed profile of your behaviors and preferences, and the search results and social feeds made by advertising companies are strongly incentivized to push you toward sites or apps that show you more ads from these platforms. It’s a business model built around surveillance, which is particularly striking since it’s the one that most consumer internet businesses rely upon.
Big Business: Some of the larger (generally more boring) tech companies like Microsoft and Oracle and Salesforce exist to get money from other big companies that need business software but will pay a premium if it’s easy to manage and easy to lock down the ways that employees use it. Very little of this technology is a delight to use, especially because the customers for it are obsessed with controlling and monitoring their workers, but these are some of the most profitable companies in tech.
Individuals: Companies like Apple and Amazon want you to pay them directly for their products, or for the products that others sell in their store. (Although Amazon’s Web Services exist to serve that Big Business market, above.) This is one of the most straightforward business models—you know exactly what you’re getting when you buy an iPhone or a Kindle, or when you subscribe to Spotify, and because it doesn’t rely on advertising or cede purchasing control to your employer, companies with this model tend to be the ones where individual people have the most power.
That’s it. Pretty much every company in tech is trying to do one of those three things, and you can understand why they make their choices by seeing how it connects to these three business models
blogs  lists  anil.dash  ethics  technology  tech  culture 
march 2018 by po
« earlier      
per page:    204080120160

related tags

1990s  abstraction  academics  accelerationism  accessibility  acquisitions  activism  adafruit  adolescence  adoption  adversarial  advertising  advice  advocacy  aesthetics  africa  african.americans  aggregation  aggregator  ai  airbnb  alcohol  algorithm  algorithms  alienation  amazon  ambition  analog  analysis  anil.dash  animation  anthropomorphized.lawnmower  anti.patterns  antipatterns  anxiety  api  apologetics  apple  architecture  archive  archives  archiving  arduino  art  artifacts  artillery  artistry  aspirations  assholes  assistance  asthma  attention  audacity  audio  audiographs  augmentation  augmented.reality  authoritarianism  automation  automobiles  awareness  aws  baselines  beej  beos  best.practices  biases  big.data  bigdata  biology  blame.the.user  blockchain  blog  blogs  book  books  bootstrap  booze  brain  brilliant  brogrammers  buckminster.fuller  bullying  bungles  burnout  business  business.ethics  buzzwords  cameras  campaigns  capital  capital.flight  capitalism  captialism  career  careers  cars  censorship  change  cheatsheets  chef  chemistry  china  chrome  chronemics  cinema  clang  classic  classics  click.track  climate.change  cloud  cms  coding  cognition  coin.mining  cold.war  collaboration  collapse  comic  commitment  commodification  communication  communications  communities  community  comparison  compassion  computer  computer.vision  computers  computing  conference  conferences  connectors  consciousness  consolidation  consumerism  containers  contempt  content  cooking  copyright  corporatism  corruption  cpu  critique  cryptography  cuda  culture  current.events  cyberpunk  cycles  dashboards  data  data.leak  databases  dba  death  defunct  demand  democracy  depression  design  development  devops  dictionary  dilbert  dinosaurs  dinosaurs.humping  disney  disruption  distributed.ledger  diversity  diy  dnd  docker  doctor  documentary.film  doom  dopamine  dormant  drones  drums  dual.use  dystopia  echo  economics  economy  editorials  education  eff  elections  electricity  electronics  elite  elitism  elon.musk  email  emergency  encryption  energy  engineering  engineyard  english  entrepreneur  environment  episodes  erlang  erosion  erotica  escapism  ethics  evolution  exclusivity  exploration  facebook  facial.recognition  fail  failure  fallacies  fantasy  farming  fascinating  fashion  fax  fear  feminism  fiction  film  finance  firefly  firewire  firm  flac  foley  folklore  food  ford  forensics  forum  foss  frameworks  fraud  freedom  fundraising  funny  future  futurism  gadget  games  garden  gartner  gender  geodetics  ghana  gis  glenn.gould  gmf  golang  google  google.maps  government  gpu  graphics  guides  h1b  hacking  happiness  hardware  harry.potter  harvard  hazards  healthcare  hearsay  help  helpful  high.cardinality  hiring  history  hn  hollywood  horror  hosting  hugo.gernsback  human  humanity  humor  hype  hypercard  hypermedia  hyperthreading  ibm  identity  identity.theft  imdb  immigration  imsi  income  india  industrial  industry  inequality  inflation  infosec  infrastructure  inherited.capital  innovation  inspiration  instapaper  instruction  intel  interesting  international  internet  internet.of.shit  interop  interoperability  interpersonal  interview  interviews  investigative.journalism  investing  investment  investments  iot  iphone  ipod  ipv6  it  japan  jargon  java  javascript  jeff.bezos  jobs  joi.ito  journalism  junk  kann  keypress  keywords  labor  language  languages  latency  law  law.enforcement  lawyers  leadership  learning  legacy  legacy.capital  lemurs  lessons.learned  lexicon  liberty  lighting  limits  linkrot  links  linux  liquor  lisp  list  lists  lithium  lockin  lolbuttcoin  machine.learning  maciej  magnets  maintenance  management  manifesto  mapping  marketing  markets  mars  marshall.macluhan  mass.media  materials  maths  maturescience  meaning  mecha  media  media.conservation  medicine  mergers  metrics  microwave.ovens  migration  military  military.intelligence  mining  mobile  mobiles  models  modernism  modernity  money  mongodb  monitoring  moral.hazards  moral.panic  moral.panics  morality  motorola  movies  mp3  mud  music  mvc  nanotech  nasa  nationalism  natural.language.processing  nature  neil.postman  neoliberalism  network  networking  networks  new.zealand  newness  news  nextstep  nhtsa  nonsense  nonserious  noodles  norbert.weiner  norway  not.invented.here  nsa  nsfw  nvidia  observability  obsolete  occult  ocr  offshoring  oligarchy  olpc  online  oped  openbsd  opengl  opensores  opportunity  opsec  ora  oracle  orbital  organization  os  overload  paas  panopticon  papers  paranoia  parsing  patterns  pay  payment  pearson  pedagogy  perception  percussion  performance  perl  philosophy  phone  phones  photography  physics  pinboard  plutocracy  pmp  podcast  podcasts  police  policy  politics  pollution  portfolio  post.labor  postmodernism  postmodernity  poverty  power  preppers  presentation  presentations  preservation  pricing  primary.sources  primitive  privacy  privilege  privsec  probe  problems  proceedings  programmed.obsolescence  programming  progress  project.management  projects  propaganda  prototyping  provisioning  psychology  public.policy  python  quotes  racism  radar  radio  rant  rants  reality  reanimation  recording  recruiting  reddit  redhat  reference  regulatory.capture  reincarnation  religion  renewables  rent.seeking  repair  research  resiliency  resources  retro  retrocomputing  revenue  rhetoric  rhythm  risc  risk  risk.analysis  risks  rms  robot  robotics  robots  rocketry  rpi  rumors  russia  russian  s3  saas  sabotage  safety  samplers  satellites  scaling  scanning  science  science.fiction  scifi  sculpture  sdn  secrecy  security  semantic.web  semiotics  services  sex  sexism  sf  sharing.economy  shifting.baseline  shipping  shorthand  singularity  skills  skills.gap  slack  smart  sniffer  soc  social.media  society  soft  software  software.engineering  solar  solitude  space  spacex  spectrum  spying  sre  stac  stack  stacks  startup  startups  statoil  steve.jobs  stingray  storage  streaming  strength  summary  sundial  surveilance  surveillance  surveillance.capitalism  surveillance.state  survival  sustainability  sv  synthesizer  synthetic.muscles  sysadmin  systems  tags  tcp.ip  teams  tech  technical  technique  techniques  technocracy  technology  technology.race  technophobia  telephones  ternary.logic  testing  theory  threats  tim.oreilly  time  timeline  tlb  todo  todomvc  tools  tracking  training  translate.com  translation  trashtalk  treaties  trends  trope  trust  tunnelling  twitter  tyler.cowen  tyranny  tyrrany  uber  ultrasound  unabomber  unions  unix  unregulated.industry  usa  usb  useful  utopianism  vc  vendor.lock.in  video  video.games  videogames  videos  vintage  virtualization  visas  visual  visualization  vmware  voyeurism  vps  vulnerability  waldos  walled.gardens  war  warfare  warnings  waste  wealth  weapons  web  webcomics  weird  wiki  wire.recording  wireless  wolfe  women  wordpress  words  worst.practices  writer  writing  ww1  youth  zuckerberg  zune 

Copy this bookmark:



description:


tags: