Life is Short
"One heuristic for distinguishing stuff that matters is to ask yourself whether you'll care about it in the future. Fake stuff that matters usually has a sharp peak of seeming to matter. That's how it tricks you. The area under the curve is small, but its shape jabs into your consciousness like a pin."
from instapaper
3 hours ago
Life is Short
"Cultivate a habit of impatience about the things you most want to do. Don't wait before climbing that mountain or writing that book or visiting your mother. You don't need to be constantly reminding yourself why you shouldn't wait. Just don't wait."
from instapaper
3 hours ago
Blackstone's Byron Wien Discusses Lessons Learned in His First 80 Years
"Every year try doing something you have never done before that is totally out of your comfort zone"
from instapaper
3 hours ago
Blackstone's Byron Wien Discusses Lessons Learned in His First 80 Years
"Don’t try to be better than your competitors, try to be different. There is always going to be someone smarter than you, but there may not be someone who is more imaginative."
from instapaper
3 hours ago
Blackstone's Byron Wien Discusses Lessons Learned in His First 80 Years
"Younger people are naturally insecure and tend to overplay their accomplishments. Most people don’t become comfortable with who they are until they’re in their 40’s. By that time they can underplay their achievements and become a nicer, more likeable person. Try to get to that point as soon as you can."
from instapaper
3 hours ago
Blackstone's Byron Wien Discusses Lessons Learned in His First 80 Years
"On philanthropy my approach is to try to relieve pain rather than spread joy. Music, theatre and art museums have many affluent supporters, give the best parties and can add to your social luster in a community. They don’t need you. Social service, hospitals and educational institutions can make the world a better place and help the disadvantaged make their way toward the American dream."
from instapaper
3 hours ago
Blackstone's Byron Wien Discusses Lessons Learned in His First 80 Years
"When meeting someone new, try to find out what formative experience occurred in their lives before they were seventeen. It is my belief that some important event in everyone’s youth has an influence on everything that occurs afterwards."
from instapaper
3 hours ago
Blackstone's Byron Wien Discusses Lessons Learned in His First 80 Years
"Have a point of view before you start a book or article and see if what you think is confirmed or refuted by the author"
from instapaper
3 hours ago
Blackstone's Byron Wien Discusses Lessons Learned in His First 80 Years
"Write op-eds and thought pieces for major publications. Organize discussion groups to bring your thoughtful friends together."
from instapaper
3 hours ago
Blackstone's Byron Wien Discusses Lessons Learned in His First 80 Years
"Concentrate on finding a big idea that will make an impact on the people you want to influence. The Ten Surprises, which I started doing in 1986, has been a defining product. People all over the world are aware of it and identify me with it. What they seem to like about it is that I put myself at risk by going on record with these events which I believe are probable and hold myself accountable at year-end. If you want to be successful and live a long, stimulating life, keep yourself at risk intellectually all the time"
from instapaper
3 hours ago
Maria Konnikova Shows Her Cards
"If poker is an analog to real life, does it help or hurt to be a woman?

Obviously, the first thing people notice about me is my gender. And people stereotype.

When you see someone looking a certain way, you assume they play a certain way. So once I figure out how they view women, I can figure out how to play against them. They’re not seeing me as a poker player, they’re seeing me as a female poker player.

There are people who’d rather die than be bluffed by a woman. They’ll never fold to me because that’s an affront to their masculinity.

I never bluff them. I know that no matter how strong my hand, they are still going to call me because they just can’t fold to a girl.

Other people think women are incapable of bluffing. They think if I’m betting really aggressively, it means I have an incredibly strong hand. I bluff those people all the time.

There are people who think that women shouldn’t be at a poker table, and they try to bully me. So, what do I do? I let them. And I wait to be in a good position so that I can take their chips. Just like life, right?"
from instapaper
yesterday
Life and Death at the T.J. Maxx by Anna Anderson
"made a break for it one night, kicked my way up to the surface, determined to “reach out” as they say, which is an action ten times harder to perform than it sounds. I needed to tell someone I was sinking, and that I seemed to be losing the will to swim. I needed to tell someone how bad it had gotten. I needed to tell someone even if it was just to have someone hear it. Even if it was just to hear the words come out of my mouth.

I sat in my car in the parking lot of a grocery store and called my friend. I began by asking how she was and listened to her response with an ache in my chest. The ache was the longing to live where she was living – above the surface. And then the moment came. She asked me how I was. I opened my mouth to let it all out. Or to at least say something about the trouble I was in. But just as soon as I opened my mouth, an undertow ripped me away and plunged me back into the deep. All I could get out was, “I’m doing okay. Good to hear your voice.” I hung up the phone and found myself reaching my toes down again. Nothing."
from instapaper
yesterday
A brief addendum to the previous post: It goes a long way towards explaining wh... —Snakes and Ladders “A brief addendum to the previous post: It goes a long way towards explaining why in my writing I so often try to resurrect abandoned metaphors and
Difference is valuable in itself because of a phenomenon that has never been described better than Kenneth Burke described it decades ago in his great essay on “Terministic Screens”: every vocabulary brings certain aspects of reality into clear view while simultaneously screening out others.
diversity  language 
3 days ago
excerpts from my Sent folder: on exhausted languages —Snakes and Ladders “What I really am, by vocation and avocation, is a historian of ideas, and when you’ve been a historian of ideas for several decades you’re bound to notice how a certain voca
Anyway, when you do this kind of work you develop — or you damn well ought to develop — an awareness that many of our vocabularies are evanescent because of their highly limited explanatory power. You see, in a given discipline or topic area, one vocabulary coming on as another fades away, and you don’t expect the new one to last any longer than the previous one did. I think this makes it easier for you to consider the possibility that a whole explanatory language is basically useless. But while those languages last people get profoundly attached to them and are simply unwilling to question them — they become axioms for their users — which means that conversations cease to be conversations but rather turn into endlessly iterated restatements of quasi-religious conviction. “Intersecting monologues,” as Rebecca West said.

Often when I’m grading essays, or talking to my students about their essays, I notice that a certain set of terms are functioning axiomatically for them in ways that impede actual thought. When that happens I will sometimes ask, “How would you describe your position if you couldn’t use that word?” And I try to force the same discipline on myself on those occasions (too rare of course) when I realize that I am allowing a certain set of terms to become an intellectual crutch.
teaching  language 
3 days ago
Q&A: Dr. David Katz of Yale University’s Prevention Research Center – Boston Magazine
"You’ve said, “What we know about the fundamentals of healthful eating is as decisive as it is dull.” Meanwhile, we keep searching for the perfect diet. What’s the answer to the big “what should we be eating” question?

The “what” is easy. Michael Pollan nailed it. Eat food, not too much, mostly plants. Even if we have doubts about whether a mostly plant diet is better than a more mixed diet or a Paleo style diet, it’s moot because there are 7 billion of us on the planet. We cannot be 7 billion hunter gatherers. The land cost and environmental cost of eating animals, the ethical cost of raising animals, everything argues in favor of a mostly plant based diet."
from instapaper
3 days ago
The Differentiated University: Better Serving the Diverse Needs of Tomorrow's Students
A nice model to think about the different ways to think about college students and how to engage them differently
university  Segmentation 
6 days ago
Twitter
My own description of the book might be “sobering.” I deeply admire the figures I wrote about, and find them brilli…
from twitter_favs
6 days ago
Cass Sunstein: How I Write
"The habit I’ve developed is to write in any free half hour I might find."
writing  scheduling  pomodoro  from instapaper
16 days ago
Cass Sunstein: How I Write
"Most days I’ll mostly write from 9:30 until noon. There’ll be stops and starts, and I’ll typically go from one project to another, depending on how they’re going. At the moment I’m working on an article in the general area of behavioral economics and public policy. I’m also working on a magazine piece, on a very different issue. I like to go back and forth—if I’m stuck on one, I’ll jump to the other. I’m also working on my next book, which has nothing to do with my current one. I’ll turn to that if I feel something’s brewing there. Most mornings I’ll spend time on two or three different writing projects."
writing  scheduling  from instapaper
16 days ago
Investment Pace —AVC “We were hanging out with friends last night and one of them asked me how many investments I have made this year. I replied “one so far.””
When you are making early-stage investments, which require a lot of your personal involvement over a seven to ten year period, you can only take on so many projects.

If you assume the average hold period for an early stage investment is seven years and if you make one to two investments per year, you will have between seven and fourteen portfolio companies to manage at any one time.

The low end of that range is quite manageable. The high end of that range is not. I have been there.

I believe that early stage venture capital done right is a service business in which the entrepreneur and the company they started is our customer.
advising  venture 
20 days ago
Balding Out
"A friend of mine in China who is a Christian missionary, told me a story about a time he was invited to speak at the local English corner they had in the apartment development where locals would get together hopefully with foreigners and practice English. He was asked to speak on what is the meaning of life, perfect for a part time missionary. He said he knew what people would say having lived in China for sometime but even so was stunned at how deeply and rigidly held the belief that making money was the entire meaning of life. There was no value system. There was no exogenously held right or wrong, only whether you made money. With apologies to a bastardized Dostoevsky, with money as God, all is permissible."
from instapaper
21 days ago
Kareem Abdul-Jabbar: Hollywood's New "Zero Tolerance" on Offensive Speech Makes Zero Sense
"We must not let these discordant sounds distract us from the deeper injustices. Companies quick to fire seem more interested in promoting a memorial to their virtue than attacking the systemic problems that would address putting more people of color, women and LGBTQ people behind the camera and in executive positions. In the 1,100 top films from 2007 to 2017, only 4 percent of the directors were female. And even if women do direct a successful film, they are rarely hired to direct another of the same level. Over the same span, only 5.2 percent of the 1,223 directors were black, and 3.2 percent were Asian."
from instapaper
21 days ago
Opinion | How to Get America on the Mediterranean Diet
"The landmark analysis of the eating patterns of an isolated Greek population strongly suggested that a calorie-limited diet high in fresh fruits and vegetables, whole grains, and olive oil and low in animal protein, particularly red meat, could lower the risk of heart attacks and strokes, decrease chronic disease and extend life.

Medical research over the last half-century has largely borne out this initial finding. Weight-loss fads and eating trends come and go, but the so-called Mediterranean diet has stood fast. “Among all diets,” Dr. Walter Willett of Harvard’s T.H. Chan School of Public Health concluded in an email, “the traditional Mediterranean diet is most strongly supported for delivering long term health and wellbeing.”"
from instapaper
22 days ago
the blog garden
"A well-thought-out tagging system on a single blog creates chains of associated ideas, with the logic of association governed by a single mind (or in the case of a group blog, a set of intentionally connected minds). And such chains are powerful generators of intellectual and aesthetic value."
from instapaper
22 days ago
City Street Orientations around the World - Geoff Boeing
By popular request, this is a quick follow-up to this post comparing the orientation of streets in 25 US cities using Python and OSMnx. Here are 25 more cities around the world:
cities  data  python 
23 days ago
Nike Says Its $250 Running Shoes Will Make You Run Much Faster. What if That’s Actually True? - The New York Times
Using public race reports and shoe records from Strava, a fitness app that calls itself the social network for athletes, The Times found that runners in Vaporflys ran 3 to 4 percent faster than similar runners wearing other shoes, and more than 1 percent faster than the next-fastest racing shoe.

We found that the difference was not explained by faster runners choosing to wear the shoes, by runners choosing to wear them in easier races or by runners switching to Vaporflys after running more training miles. Instead, the analysis suggests that, in a race between two marathoners of the same ability, a runner wearing Vaporflys would have a real advantage over a competitor not wearing them.
running  shoes 
23 days ago
What we buy can be used to predict our politics, race or education — sometimes with more than 90 percent accuracy - The Washington Post
By a relatively large margin, the view that best predicted being white in 2016 was “approve of police striking citizens.” In previous decades, the best indicator of whiteness was saying that the government was spending the right amount (or too much) on improving the condition of black residents.
race  Politics  data 
23 days ago
American Political-Party Affiliation as a Predictor of Usage of an Adultery Website | SpringerLink
Linking an August 2015 leak of user data from Ashley Madison to 2012 voter registration rolls from five U.S. states, we found 80,000 matches between 200,000 Ashley Madison user accounts and 50 million voters. According to simple rates in the sample, and also to predictively validated regression models controlling for state, gender, and age, we found that Democrats were least likely to use Ashley Madison, Libertarians were most likely, and Republicans, Greens, and unaffiliated voters were in between. Our results provide support for theories arguing that people with stricter sexual attitudes are paradoxically more likely to engage in deviant sexual behavior.
sexuality  Politics 
23 days ago
Opinion | The Quiet Death of Racial Progress
"That is to say, the left-wingers have it correct when they point to the systems of oppression that pervade society: the legacy of residential segregation; the racist attitudes in the workplace that demonstrably make it much harder for African-American men to get jobs; the prejudices — in the schools, in the streets and in the judicial system — that make it much more likely that African-American males will be punished, incarcerated and marginalized.

But conservatives are right to point to the importance of bourgeois norms. Three institutions do an impressive job of reducing racial disparity: the military, marriage and church. As the A.E.I. study shows, black men who served in the military are more likely to be in the middle class than those who did not. Black men who attended religious services are 76 percent more likely to attain at least middle-class status than those who did not. As Chetty’s research shows, the general presence of fathers — not just one’s own — in the community is a powerful determinant of whether young men will be able to rise and thrive."
from instapaper
4 weeks ago
Jack Ma: How to be successful in your 20s, 30s, 40s and beyond
When Alibaba founder and CEO Jack Ma was a young adult, he applied to over 30 jobs and got rejected by all of them. Today, the 53-year-old's e-commerce company is valued at $519 billion, although Ma didn't start achieving career success until his 30s.

"In life, it's not how much we achieved, it's how much we've gone through the tough days and mistakes," Ma recently said to a group of young leaders invited to the World Economic Forum annual meeting in Davos, Switzerland. "If you want to be successful, learn from the other people's mistakes, don't learn from the successful stories."

As an alum of the Young Global Leaders network, Ma shed light on what the room of young adults should focus on within the next 30 years.


"When you are 20 to 30 years old, you should follow a good boss [and] join a good company to learn how to do things properly," Ma said.

"When you are 30 to 40 years old, if you want to do something yourself, just do it. You still can afford to lose, to fail," he added.

Soon thereafter, though, Ma recommended that people start prioritizing stability, family and the future generations.

Instead of diving into a new field or subject toward the later years in your career, he said, "when you're 4
career 
5 weeks ago
the Ministry of Amnesia
"So why is that? Why, though certainly there is some anger at the global-capitalist system, is there, relative to reasonable expectations, so little? Why don’t people care that, since the massively reckless incompetencies of 2008, almost nothing has changed? (Lanchester documents the insignificant of the changes very thoroughly.)

The first answer is that almost nobody — almost nobody — remembers what happened in 2008. And why don’t they remember? Because of social media and smartphones.

I cannot, of course, provide documentary proof for that claim. But as the Marxists used to say I believe it is no accident that the shaking of the foundations of the global economy and “the longest period of declining real incomes in recorded economic history” happened just as the iPhone was taking serious hold on the imagination of the developed world, and Facebook and Twitter were becoming key components of everyday life in that world. On your smartphones you can get (a) a stream of prompts for visceral wrath and fear and then (b) games and distractions that accomplish the suddenly-necessary self-soothing. Between the wrath and fear and the subsequent soothing, who can remember what happened last week, much less ten years ago? Silicon Valley serves the global capitalist order as its Ministry of Amnesia. “What is it I was so concerned about?”"
from instapaper
5 weeks ago
Tech Vs. 300 million cows. Can India’s sprawling ag industry be tamed by a startup?
A good piece focusing on the start of opportunity in emerging markets, and the challenges of seeing investment potential
VC  venture  emergingmarkets 
5 weeks ago
On Passion and Its Discontents - Study Hacks - Cal Newport
"“While ‘find your passion’ is well-intended advice, it might not be good advice.

A new study by Stanford psychologists examines the hidden implications of the advice to ‘find your passion.’

Mantras like ‘find your passion’ carry hidden implications…they imply that once an interest resonates, pursuing it will be easy. But, the research found that when people encounter inevitable challenges, that mindset makes it more likely people will surrender their newfound interest.
And the idea that passions are found fully formed implies that the number of interests a person has is limited. That can cause people to narrow their focus and neglect other areas.”"
from instapaper
6 weeks ago
Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez on her Catholic faith and the urgency of a criminal justice reform
"Solutions are already beginning to take shape, which include unraveling the War on Drugs, reconsidering mandatory minimum sentencing and embracing a growing private prison abolition movement that urges us to reconsider the levels at which the United States pursues mass incarceration. No matter where these proposals take us, we should pursue such conversations with an openness to change and an aim to rehabilitate our brothers and sisters wherever possible and wherever necessary. By nature, a society that forgives and rehabilitates its people is a society that forgives and transforms itself. That takes a radical kind of love, a secret of which is given in the Lord’s Prayer: Forgive us our trespasses, as we forgive those who trespass against us."
from instapaper
6 weeks ago
Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez on her Catholic faith and the urgency of a criminal justice reform
"The still imprisoned are not so lucky. By virtually every measure, the United States incarcerates more of its people than any other nation in the world. When we look at the fuller picture of who we imprison, for how long and why, it may not be a stretch to conclude that our criminal justice system could very well benefit from a rite of penance of its own. There is overwhelming evidence that mass incarceration evolved as an outgrowth of Jim Crow laws, which itself was a system rooted in the subjugation of former slaves. According to legal scholar Michelle Alexander, there are more African-Americans under correctional control today than were enslaved in 1850—that is, before the Civil War."
from instapaper
6 weeks ago
Ridehail Revolution: Groundbreaking ITS dissertation examines discrimination and travel patterns for Lyft, Uber, and taxis - UCLA Institute of Transportation Studies
By contrast, Lyft and Uber nearly eliminate the racial differences in service. On both services, a black rider had about a 4 percent higher likelihood of being cancelled than a white rider. But 99.7 percent of Lyft and Uber riders reached their destination even if one driver cancelled a trip. While unlawful discrimination from taxi drivers prevent many black riders from completing a trip, driver biases on Uber and Lyft result in delayed, but not denied, mobility. And policy changes for ridehail apps — such as tracking driver cancellation behavior, permitting riders to use pseudonyms, and changing at what point in the pickup process drivers learn a rider’s name or race — could help erase the racial gap almost entirely.

Lyft is essentially omnipresent across LA, and most riders use the service only occasionally. The Lyft travel data showed no evidence that any Los Angeles neighborhoods are excluded from service based on the characteristics of their residents. Indeed, during the study period Lyft reac
socialimpact  business  bookproject 
6 weeks ago
Opinion | Republican or Conservative, You Have to Choose
"As Scruton put it in his bracing primer, “Conservatism: An Invitation to the Great Tradition,” “The question of which comes first, liberty or order, was to divide liberals from conservatives for the next 200 years.”

The practical upshot is that conservatives have always placed tremendous emphasis on the sacred space where individuals are formed. This space is populated by institutions like the family, religion, the local community, the local culture, the arts, the schools, literature and the manners that govern everyday life."
from instapaper
7 weeks ago
How McKinsey Lost Its Way in South Africa
"McKinsey refused to work in South Africa until it embraced democracy in the mid-1990s, but records show that it consults for many authoritarian governments, including the world’s mightiest, China, to a degree unheard of for a foreign company. Late last year, two McKinsey partners spoke at a meeting of the state-controlled conglomerate China Merchants Group that focused on carrying out Communist Party directives. McKinsey is also advising the Saudi crown prince, Mohammed bin Salman, as he seeks to make its economy less reliant on oil.

While confidentiality is necessary in private business, it can become problematic when public money is involved, as in South Africa, or for that matter in the United States, where McKinsey has advised more than 40 federal agencies, including the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the Central Intelligence Agency, the Defense Department and the Food and Drug Administration."
from instapaper
7 weeks ago
Envisioning a (Hobbit-like) Culture of Community Data Sharing | LinkedIn
"CDT's role would be to verify and audit the trustworthiness of community partners, including provision of expertly-crafted legal agreement templates, in order to facilitate smoother, more efficient point-to-point data sharing. Click the network image below to get more information and download a copy of the PDF."
from instapaper
7 weeks ago
Silicon Valley would be wise to follow China’s lead
"In California, the blogosphere has been full of chatter about the inequity of life. Some of this, especially for women, is true and for certain individuals their day of reckoning has been long overdue. But many of the soul-sapping discussions seem like unwarranted distractions. In recent months, there have been complaints about the political sensibilities of speakers invited to address a corporate audience; debates over the appropriate length of paternity leave or work-life balances; and grumbling about the need for a space for musical jam sessions. These seem like the concerns of a society that is becoming unhinged.

These topics are absent in China’s technology companies, where the pace of work is furious. Here, top managers show up for work at about 8am and frequently don’t leave until 10pm. Most of them will do this six days a week — and there are plenty of examples of people who do this for seven. Engineers have slightly different habits: they will appear about 10am and leave at midnight. Beyond the week-long breaks for Chinese new year and the October national holiday, most will just steal an additional handful of vacation days. Some technology companies also provide a rental subsidy to employees who choose to live close to corporate HQ."
from instapaper
7 weeks ago
Opinion | #MeToo Comes for the Archbishop - The New York Times
That was before I realized that if you wanted the truth about corruption in the Catholic Church, you had to listen to the extreme-seeming types, traditionalists and radicals, because they were the only ones sufficiently alienated from the institution to actually dig into its rot. (This lesson has application well beyond Catholicism.)
MeToo 
7 weeks ago
The Leader’s Calendar
"CEOs oversee a large number of organizational units and work streams and countless types of decisions. Our research finds that they should have an explicit personal agenda and that most do. A clear and effective agenda optimizes the CEO’s limited time; without one, demands from the loudest constituencies will take over, and the most important work won’t get done."
from instapaper
7 weeks ago
We will never disapprove of current levels of animal cruelty - Marginal REVOLUTION
"The majority of vegans are female in gender: e.g., 74% in USA [27], 66% in Germany [39] and 63% in UK [29];

They tend to be liberal-leftist politically: in USA, we have a 52% of liberals versus a 14% of conservatives and a 34% of self-styled “neutral” [27];

They are generally more educated than carnists (e.g., Ipsos Mori [29] for UK and Mensik et al. for Germany [39]);

They are more likely to be found in urban than country areas, with prevalence in big cities (e.g., Ipsos Mori [29] for UK, Roy Morgan Research for Australia [49] and Mensik et al. for Germany [39]);

They display an inclination to secular/atheist views on religion matters (e.g., Humane Research Council [27], where it is shown that about half of the American community of vegans/vegetarians is not religious—a percentage that is considerably higher than that of the general population)."
from instapaper
7 weeks ago
The Leader’s Calendar
"Given that work could consume every hour of their lives, CEOs have to set limits so that they can preserve their health and their relationships with family and friends. Most of the CEOs in our study recognized that. They slept, on average, 6.9 hours a night, and many had regular exercise regimens, which consumed about 9% of their nonwork hours (or about 45 minutes a day). To sustain the intensity of the job, CEOs need to train—just as elite athletes do. That means allocating time for health, fitness, and rest.

We paid special attention to the 25% of time—or roughly six hours a day—when CEOs were awake and not working. Typically, they spent about half those hours with their families, and most had learned to become very disciplined about this. Most also found at least some hours (2.1 a day, on average) for downtime, which included everything from watching television and reading for pleasure, to hobbies like photography.

The CEO’s job is mentally and physically demanding. Activities that preserve elements of normal life keep CEOs grounded and better able to engage with colleagues and workers—as opposed to distant, detached, and disconnected. CEOs also have to make time for their own professional renewal and development (which our data showed was often the biggest casualty of a packed schedule). And they must be careful, as our colleague Tom DeLong puts it, not to become “like race car drivers and treat home like a pit stop.”"
from instapaper
7 weeks ago
The Not-To-Do List: 9 Habits to Stop Now
"3. Do not agree to meetings or calls with no clear agenda or end time
If the desired outcome is defined clearly with a stated objective and agenda listing topics/questions to cover, no meeting or call should last more than 30 minutes. Request them in advance so you “can best prepare and make good use of the time together.”"
from instapaper
7 weeks ago
Why Living in a Poor Neighborhood Can Change Your Biology - Issue 61: Coordinates - Nautilus
"Consistent exposure to cortisol may re-wire the brain, for example, shrinking the pre-frontal cortex and bulking up the amygdala, the walnut-sized nodes in the brain that regulate emotions like fear and pleasure. Over time cortisol can increase the risk for depression and mental illness.

And cortisol’s physiological effects could explain the powerful links between stress and metabolic illnesses like Type 2 diabetes, obesity, and heart disease. In mice, stress amps up cravings for energy-dense foods; in people, comfort- or stress-eating is a familiar phenomenon.

Persistently elevated cortisol levels have been closely tied to weight gain, increased abdominal fat, and other aspects of metabolic syndrome, a collection of things that includes obesity and pre-diabetes. “Even if you’re not stress-eating, there’s a direct link between cortisol and Type 2 diabetes risk, and cortisol and obesity,” Hasson says."
from instapaper
8 weeks ago
Apple's Airpods Are an Omen
"There are some consequences to this scenario, if it plays out. For one, earbuds will cease to perform any social signaling whatsoever. Today, having one’s earbuds in while talking suggests that you are on a phone call, for example. Having them in while silent is a sign of inner focus—a request for privacy. That’s why bothering someone with earbuds in is such a social faux-pas: They act as a do-not-disturb sign for the body. But if AirPods or similar devices become widespread, those cues will vanish. Everyone will exist in an ambiguous state between public engagement with a room or space and private retreat into devices or media."
from instapaper
8 weeks ago
David Simon | Tony
"He was always that funny – either dry in his rhetorical savagery, or over-the-top hyperbolic in his foaming rage at vegetarians or micro-beer experts or elitist social or political orders. Everything built to a moment of careful, thoughtful wit. He often spoke as well as he wrote, and given the stylistic command of his prose work, this is saying something. I know a lot of writers. Only a few of us speak as we write. Shit, on a bad day, we can’t even write as we are supposed to write. Tony was never arch or florid; his comic exaggerations and rhetorical provocations were always somehow perfectly measured. He said what he meant and he meant what he said and he landed all of it. As a conversationalist, he simply delivered, moment to moment."
from instapaper
8 weeks ago
Opinion | The Strange Failure of the Educated Elite
"The essential point is this: Those dimwitted, stuck up blue bloods in the old establishment had something we meritocrats lack — a civic consciousness, a sense that we live life embedded in community and nation, that we owe a debt to community and nation and that the essence of the admirable life is community before self.

The meritocracy is here to stay, thank goodness, but we probably need a new ethos to reconfigure it — to redefine how people are seen, how applicants are selected, how social roles are understood and how we narrate a common national purpose."
from instapaper
8 weeks ago
Yuval Harari Works Less Than You - Study Hacks - Cal Newport
"In his recent book, Rest: Why You Get More Done When You Work Less, Alex Soojung-Kim Pang argues from historical examples and scientific findings that a four hour “creative work day” is about optimal for producing important new things.

Beyond that, a busy workday consists primarily of busywork.

In other words, Yuval Harari can sacrifice a non-trivial fraction of his working hours without blunting his impact because the hours he’s sacrificing are not the relatively small number dedicated to cultivating his next big idea."
from instapaper
8 weeks ago
Twitter
This we want to think about more. What is other than a 'firm' as the core unit of analysis? Rebecca Henderson an…
from twitter_favs
9 weeks ago
Twitter
Construction has begun in DeWitt! , Tish Boerigter, Shonn Colbrunn, Sibilla Boerigter and George Bo…
from twitter_favs
9 weeks ago
Ira Glass's Commencement Speech at the Columbia Journalism School Graduation - This American Life
"Don’t wait. Make the stuff you want to make now. No excuses. Don’t wait for the perfect job or whatever. Don’t wait. Don’t wait. Don’t wait. One of the advantages of being a journalist is you don’t need permission. You can go and run down the story now and then find a home for it. Pay someone you respect - pay a friend - a little money to be your editor and the person you talk to about your next steps. Don’t wait. You have everything you need. Don’t wait."
from instapaper
9 weeks ago
Instagram will soon show users how much time they spend in the app
"Instagram is getting a new “Usage Insights” tool that helps users see how much time they’ve spent in the social media app, according to a discovery from app researcher Jane Manchun Wong who found the feature hidden in the code of Instagram’s Android app (via TechCrunch)."
from instapaper
9 weeks ago
Under the Banner of New York
"Yes, we “carry on,” after disaster and attack, but that’s not all we do. We also function pretty well day-to-day, with our multiple gods and none, with our graven images, and our Babel of languages. We may not know our neighbors’ names but we know the name of every dog in the dog-run, and that’s OK, too. Despite rarely cooking and often drinking, despite never mowing lawns (but usually recycling), our souls are not uniformly headed to eternal damnation. We can often be found screaming at strangers in the street but we just as frequently pick them up off the floor. And then there’s also the food, art, music, theater, film, literature. But they know all that."
from instapaper
9 weeks ago
Under the Banner of New York
"It’s amazing what a narrative can make someone do. We cannot give up on offering alternative stories. Here’s one about the people of New York: we are not scum. We are every variety of human. Some of us voted for a government that caused the destruction of cities far away. Some of us didn’t. Some of us are dopers and junkies. Some of us are preschool teachers and nuns. None of us deserve to be killed in the street. We are a multiplicity of humans in an elastic social arrangement that can be stretched in many directions. It’s not broken yet. I have no idea if it will break soon—but it’s not broken yet. And here comes the rain, clearing the streets, for an hour maybe, even for a whole afternoon. We’ll be back out tomorrow."
from instapaper
9 weeks ago
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