52 things I learned in 2017
"Between projects at Fluxx, and editing a book, I learned several learnings."
from instapaper
yesterday
How to Have Fewer Regrets
"Research suggests that around age 7, humans develop an ability for what’s called counterfactual thinking, the capacity to imagine what might have been. In one study, Americans list romance as a top source of regret, followed by family, education, career and finance. Social regrets — wishing you’d married someone else, for instance — tend to be more intense than nonsocial ones. People identify regret as the second most common emotional state, after love. Don’t worry too much about missteps: Regrets of action (quitting a job, say) are generally stronger at first but fade more quickly than regrets of inaction (staying in a career you dislike), which persist and can become a sort of passive wistfulness.

Imagine regret as the psychological version of physical pain, drawing attention to something inside that’s off or in need of healing. “Regret is a signal that you’re learning from your mistakes,” Summerville says. If you wish you were more communicative about your emotions with an ex-lover, for example, let that feeling steer you to more openness in future relationships. Consider seeking help from a therapist if you experience what Summerville calls “ruminative regret,” the negative thoughts that arise repeatedly, unbidden, alongside anxiety and depression. “Poking at a wound in that way is not going to make it better,” she says."
from instapaper
yesterday
The young entrepreneur myth?
"Alright but what about successful firms? That’s what the VCs care about.

In Silicon Valley, the ones with a successful exit have an average founding age of 47!

What are we missing then?

Probably lots of stuff. This is just the basic data results. It doesn’t seem to pass the standards of modern econometrics (yet). So it may be that we can work out what is at the bottom of this. But it sure is provocative at the moment and should give Silicon Valley investors types some food for thought. It should also cause us to have another look at whether encouraging 20 somethings with endless entrepreneurship programs is a good idea."
from instapaper
yesterday
The Generalized Specialist: How Shakespeare, Da Vinci, and Kepler Excelled
"I don’t think operating over many disciplines, as I do, is a good idea for most people. I think it’s fun, that’s why I’ve done it. And I’m better at it than most people would be, and I don’t think I’m good at being the very best at handling differential equations. So, it’s been a wonderful path for me, but I think the correct path for everybody else is to specialize and get very good at something that society rewards, and then to get very efficient at doing it. But even if you do that, I think you should spend 10 to 20% of your time [on] trying to know all the big ideas in all the other disciplines. Otherwise … you’re like a one-legged man in an ass-kicking contest. It’s not going to work very well. You have to know the big ideas in all the disciplines to be safe if you have a life lived outside a cave. But no, I think you don’t want to neglect your business as a dentist to think great thoughts about Proust."
from instapaper
5 days ago
Adam Robinson on Understanding
"Virtually all investors have been told when they were younger — or implicitly believe, or have been tacitly encouraged to do so by the cookie-cutter curriculums of the business schools they all attend — that the more they understand the world, the better their investment results. It makes sense, doesn’t it? The more information we acquire and evaluate, the “better informed” we become, the better our decisions. Accumulating information, becoming “better informed,” is certainly an advantage in numerous, if not most, fields.

But not in the eld of counterintuitive world of investing, where accumulating information can hurt your investment results."
One could argue that the more you know, the more you actually 320 in there in the past
from instapaper
5 days ago
On the Complicated Economics of Attention Capital - Study Hacks - Cal Newport
"In this article, Nixon explores the question I asked above. In doing so, he outlines two main “channels” through which the new technologies of the Network Age might impact economic productivity indicators:

Channel #1: These technologies can distract employees from their actual work. If you spend less time working, and more time skimming your Facebook newsfeed, you get less done.
Channel #2: These technologies can directly and permanently reduce the rate at which employees produce value using their brains. If your workflow requires you to constantly check emails, then your ability to create new value is dampened.
My suspicion is that the second channel is the main culprit. As I’ve argued before (c.f., this article I wrote for HBR.org), the front office IT revolution, in which we hooked knowledge workers together with high-speed communication networks, has been a mixed blessing."
from instapaper
5 days ago
On the Complicated Economics of Attention Capital - Study Hacks - Cal Newport
"This is why I was pleased when many of you forwarded me an article titled: “Is the economy suffering from the crisis of attention?” It’s written by Dan Nixon, a (serious) economist at the Bank of England."
from instapaper
5 days ago
Review: Greta Gerwig’s ‘Lady Bird’ Is Big-Screen Perfection
"You might think you’ve seen this all before. You probably have, but never quite like this. What Ms. Gerwig has done — and it’s by no means a small accomplishment — is to infuse one of the most convention-bound, rose-colored genres in American cinema with freshness and surprise. The characters can look like familiar figures: the sad dad and the disapproving mom; the sullen brother and his goth girlfriend (Marielle Scott); the mean girls and the cool teachers; the too-perfect boyfriend (Lucas Hedges) and the dirtbag boyfriend (Timothée Chalamet). None of them are caricatures, though, and while everyone is mocked, nobody is treated with cruelty or contempt, at least by Ms. Gerwig. (Lady Bird is not always so kind.)"
from instapaper
5 days ago
Review: Greta Gerwig’s ‘Lady Bird’ Is Big-Screen Perfection
"The idea that attention is a form of love (and vice versa) is a beautiful insight, and in many ways it’s the key to “Lady Bird,” Greta Gerwig’s beautiful, insightful new film, the first for which she is solely credited as writer and director."
from instapaper
5 days ago
Portugal’s radical drugs policy is working. Why hasn’t the world copied it?
"Portugal’s policy rests on three pillars: one, that there’s no such thing as a soft or hard drug, only healthy and unhealthy relationships with drugs; two, that an individual’s unhealthy relationship with drugs often conceals frayed relationships with loved ones, with the world around them, and with themselves; and three, that the eradication of all drugs is an impossible goal."
from instapaper
5 days ago
How our housing choices make adult friendships more difficult
"Both these alternatives — walkable communities and co-housing — sound exotic to American ears. Thanks to shifting baselines, most Americans only know single-family dwellings and auto-dependent land use. They cannot even articulate what they are missing and often misidentify the solution as more or different private consumption.

But I do not think we should just accept that when we marry and start families, we atomize, and our friendships, like our taste in music, freeze where they were when we were young and single. We shouldn't just accept a way of living that makes interactions with neighbors and friends a burden that requires special planning.

We should recognize that by shrinking our network of strong social ties to our immediate families, we lose something important to our health and social identities, with the predictable result that we are ridden with anxiety and loneliness. We are meant to have tribes, to be among people who know us and care about us."
from instapaper
5 days ago
God’s Plan for Mike Pence - The Atlantic
"When the time comes, Pence takes the stage and greets the crowd with a booming “Hellooooo, Indiana!” He says he has “just hung up the phone” with Donald Trump and that the president asked him to “say hello.” He delivers this message with a slight chuckle that has a certain, almost subversive quality to it. Watch Pence give enough speeches, and you’ll notice that this often happens when he’s in front of a friendly crowd. He’ll be witnessing to evangelicals at a mega-church, or addressing conservative supporters at a rally, and when the moment comes for him to pass along the president’s well-wishes, the words are invariably accompanied by an amused little chuckle that prompts knowing laughter from the attendees. It’s almost as if, in that brief, barely perceptible moment, Pence is sending a message to those with ears to hear—that he recognizes the absurdity of his situation; that he knows just what sort of man he’s working for; that while things may look bad now, there is a grand purpose at work here, a plan that will manifest itself in due time. Let not your hearts be troubled, he seems to be saying. I’ve got this."
from instapaper
8 days ago
How I Lost Weight and Learned to Love Thanksgiving Again
"Much of this advice comes in the form of moralizing. But by making so much of our focus on what we’re doing “wrong,” we’ve removed much of the joy from eating and cooking. I made sure to avoid negative tones a couple of years ago when I drew up a manifesto/road guide we called simple rules for healthy eating. They include the idea that you aren’t going to avoid all processed foods, but you might try to limit them. The one I felt most passionately about was No. 7 — “Eat with other people, especially people you care about, as often as possible.” But lately, I’ve been thinking that No. 2 — “Eat as much home-cooked food as possible” — may be the most important.

I’ve recently been learning more about cooking theory — not so much following recipes, but understanding why those recipes work. A favorite guide in this quest is “Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat” by Samin Nosrat. Right there in the title are two “forbidden” elements. They’re also some of the main reasons good food tastes good.

The home-cooked food rule probably did more than any other to help Aimee and me get down to reasonable weights. Today, we’re much happier with how we look and feel. There are pictures of us looking happy in recent years around the house. Thanksgiving has reclaimed its mantle as my favorite holiday, because it’s so centered on food and family."
from instapaper
11 days ago
A few notes on daily blogging
"2) After struggling to come up with a new book idea for so long, I could start to see all the connections between posts, the patterns, the idea planets I keep orbiting. Because it’s all in one place, hyperlinked together, I can see my own obsessions in a way that is much harder elsewhere. (Also: I’m owning my turf. This place has been around for a dozen years. Longer than Twitter and Tumblr and Instagram, and if I had to bet, I’d guess it will outlast them.)"
from instapaper
14 days ago
where young evangelicals are headed – Snakes and Ladders
"Anyway, as far as I can tell, where young evangelicals are headed is simply out of evangelicalism. They have been, as Jared C. Wilson recently wrote, theologically and spiritually orphaned by pastors and other Christian leaders who were willing to entertain them and occasionally to hector them but who had no interest whatsoever in Christian discipleship. Millions of today’s young evangelicals have been utterly betrayed by a generation of pastors who could pontificate about how essential sexual purity is while simultaneously insisting that every real Christian should vote for Donald Trump, supporting their claims by a random handful of Bible verses wrenched from their context and utterly severed from the great arc of biblical story without which no piece of scriptural teaching can make sense. As I noted here, they cannot even distinguish a penitent from an impenitent sinner — that is how thoroughly they have emptied themselves of moral and spiritual understanding."
from instapaper
14 days ago
Why you’re going to see ads by tobacco companies admitting that smoking kills
"According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, smoking is the leading preventable cause of death in America and kills 480,000 people in the US each year. In comparison, drug overdoses — which public health officials now consider a full-blown epidemic due to the opioid crisis — killed more than 64,000 in 2016."
from instapaper
14 days ago
MindNode 5: Digital Mind Mapping Finally Clicked for Me
"If you're an iPad power user, you know how big an update iOS 11 was, with drag and drop leading the charge. I've used and reviewed lots of apps that benefit immensely from drag and drop support, but I don't know that there's an app category better suited for this feature than mind mapping. Mind maps are built for natural touch interaction, so it’s no surprise that by adopting iOS 11’s systemwide drag and drop features, MindNode became the app I always wanted."
from instapaper
14 days ago
Eugene Peterson on changing his mind about same-sex issues and marriage
"I wouldn’t have said this 20 years ago, but now I know a lot of people who are gay and lesbian and they seem to have as good a spiritual life as I do. I think that kind of debate about lesbians and gays might be over. People who disapprove of it, they’ll probably just go to another church. So we’re in a transition and I think it’s a transition for the best, for the good. I don’t think it’s something that you can parade, but it’s not a right or wrong thing as far as I’m concerned.

RNS: A follow-up: If you were pastoring today and a gay couple in your church who were Christians of good faith asked you to perform their same-sex wedding ceremony, is that something you would do?

EP: Yes."
from instapaper
14 days ago
The Voices in Blue America’s Head
"Still, the one show is serving them awfully well. An executive at another podcasting company told me that assuming standard industry rates, Crooked Media is most likely bringing in at least $50,000 in advertising revenue for each episode of “Pod Save America” — which at two episodes a week is about $5 million a year. That has allowed the company to turn away the many investors who have approached it. Peter Chernin, whose Chernin Group acquired a reported 51 percent stake in the media company Barstool Sports last year, was one of them. “I think it’s more unusual than standard to turn down investors,” Chernin told me, “but it’s been very smart on their part.”"
from instapaper
17 days ago
Why Free Markets Make Fools of Us
"Akerlof and Shiller believe that the harms of alcohol are greatly underappreciated. They think that those harms “could be comparable to the harms from cigarettes, affecting not just 3 or 4 percent of the population, as a chronic life-downer [i.e., cause of a shortened life], but, rather, affecting 15 to 30 percent; the higher number especially if we also include the alcoholics’ most affected family members.” Akerlof and Shiller assemble suggestive evidence that alcohol consumption does far more damage to health than we think. Their larger theme is that “alcohol studies remain largely underfunded,” and without the necessary research, “we are especially prone to be phished for phools, since we cannot know whether we have the right story.” In their view, significant federal tax increases on ethanol (the kind of alcohol in alcoholic drinks) could have major health benefits—but the industry has successfully worked to prevent any such increases."
from instapaper
17 days ago
Why Free Markets Make Fools of Us
"In a reversal of Adam Smith, Akerlof and Shiller contend that the invisible hand of the market guarantees phishing. Consider Cinnabon, whose brilliant motto is “Life Needs Frosting,” and which attracts customers with a seductive smell (and which has not made caloric information on its products at all easy to find). Or consider health clubs, a $22 billion industry with over 50 million customers, many of whom choose expensive monthly contracts, even though they would save a lot of money if they paid by the visit. In effect, they are paying not to go to the gym.

With reference to such examples, Akerlof and Shiller suggest that people can be imagined to have two kinds of tastes: those that would really make their lives better, and those that determine how they actually choose. In their view, the latter—influenced by a kind of “monkey-on-the-shoulder” who makes bad choices—often prevails. The problem is that as if by an invisible hand, companies “out of their own self-interest will satisfy those monkey-on-the-shoulder tastes.”"
from instapaper
17 days ago
Why Free Markets Make Fools of Us
"Akerlof and Shiller believe that once we understand human psychology, we will be a lot less enthusiastic about free markets and a lot more worried about the harmful effects of competition. In their view, companies exploit human weaknesses not necessarily because they are malicious or venal, but because the market makes them do it. Those who fail to exploit people will lose out to those who do. In making that argument, Akerlof and Shiller object that the existing work of behavioral economists and psychologists offers a mere list of human errors, when what is required is a broader account of how and why markets produce systemic harm."
from instapaper
17 days ago
Why Free Markets Make Fools of Us
"Akerlof and Shiller use the word “phish” to mean a form of angling, by which phishermen (such as banks, drug companies, real estate agents, and cigarette companies) get phools (such as investors, sick people, homeowners, and smokers) to do something that is in the phisherman’s interest, but not in the phools’. There are two kinds of phools: informational and psychological. Informational phools are victimized by factual claims that are intentionally designed to deceive them (“it’s an old house, sure, but it just needs a few easy repairs”). More interesting are psychological phools, led astray either by their emotions (“this investment could make me rich within three months!”) or by cognitive biases (“real estate prices have gone up for the last twenty years, so they’re bound to go up for the next twenty as well”)."
from instapaper
17 days ago
100 Notable Books of 2017
"elected and with an introduction by Darryl Pinckney. (New York Review Books, $19.95.) The landmark American critic surveys everything from the 1968 Democratic convention to the literature of New York City."
from instapaper
20 days ago
A Chess Novice Challenged Magnus Carlsen. He Had One Month to Train
"Max has been that way longer than he can remember. His parents say he crawled before his twin sister. Max grew up in the Westchester County, N.Y., suburbs—his father ran a lighting company and his mother was a theater actress before staying home to care for her kids—and he was an inquisitive child with a voracious appetite for learning.

Now he optimizes his days around that interest. He takes a one-hour walk every afternoon to clear his head. He writes out goals for the next day before he goes to bed. And then he sleeps for eight hours. A friend once asked Max what he meant when he claimed that eight hours of sleep was nonnegotiable.

“Do you have a sister?” Max said.

“Yes.”

“Would you ever kiss her?”

“No!”

“Exactly,” Max said."
from instapaper
23 days ago
The Tragedy of Liberalism
"The humanities and social sciences also focus with particular sharpness upon identity politics and the redressing of past injustices to specific groups. This is done under the guise of “multiculturalism” and “diversity,” values that are invoked in the name of an effort to continue the evisceration of culture (including the actual transmission of cultural traditions) in the pursuit of liberal autonomy. So long as oppressed groups show evidence of commitment to the liberal project, their inclusion becomes a tool for advancing liberalism; if disadvantaged groups show reluctance to join in or disagreement with liberalism’s aims, they are rejected as incompatible."
from instapaper
24 days ago
The Tragedy of Liberalism
"By 2008 the financial industry, much like contemporary college campuses, had been divested of its long-standing culture rooted in nature, time, and place. Indeed, training in the dorm parties and fraternities of one’s college appears to have been the perfect preparation for a career in the mortgage bond market. The mortgage industry rested upon the financial equivalent of “hookups,” random encounters of strangers in which appetites (for outsized debt or interest) were sated without any care for the consequences for the wider community. Apparently, responsibility- and cost-free loans were mutually satisfactory and wholly liberated from the constraints of an older financial order. However, in another reflection of the state of affairs on college campuses, these arrangements led to gross irresponsibility and abuse, damaging entire communities and demolishing lives. The response has been the same—calls for greater government regulation and oversight of the consequences of untrammeled appetite, including threat of penalization (rarely enforced) and requiring massive expansion of an administrative state to oversee a most basic human interaction: the securing of shelter. Liberated from the confinements and limitations of local market cultures, the result is not perfect liberty but the expansion of Leviathan. The destruction of culture thus achieves not liberation but bondage."
from instapaper
24 days ago
The Tragedy of Liberalism
"This is not because one party advances individualism without cutting back on statism while the other achieves (and fails) in the opposite direction; rather, both move simultaneously together, as a matter of systemic logic that follows our deepest philosophical premises.

The result is a political system that trumpets liberty, but which inescapably creates conditions of powerlessness, fragmentation, mistrust, and resentment. The liberated individual comes to despise the creature of its making and the source of its powerlessness—whether perceived to be the state or the market (protests to the former represented by the Tea Party and to the latter by Occupy Wall Street). The tools of liberalism cease to be governable and become instead independent forces to which disempowered individuals must submit—whether the depersonalized public bureaucracy or depersonalized globalizing market forces, aided and abetted by technology, from surveillance to automation, that no longer seems under the control of its masters."
from instapaper
25 days ago
The Tragedy of Liberalism
"While classical liberalism looks back to a liberalism achieved and lost—particularly the founding philosophy of America that stressed natural rights, limited government, and a relatively free and open market, “progressive” liberalism longs for a liberalism not yet achieved, one that strives to transcend the limitations of the past and even envisions a transformed humanity, its consciousness enlarged, practicing what Edward Bellamy called “the religion of solidarity.”"
from instapaper
25 days ago
The Tragedy of Liberalism
"As described by Louis Hartz in his 1955 book The Liberal Tradition in America, the nature of our debates themselves is defined within the framework of liberalism. That framework has seemingly expanded, but it is nonetheless bounded, in as much as the political debates of our time have pitted one variant of liberalism against another, which were given the labels “conservatism” and “liberalism” but which are better categorized as “classical liberalism” and “progressive liberalism.”"
from instapaper
25 days ago
The Robot Revolution Is Coming. Just Be Patient. - Bloomberg
"In a new paper, economists Erik Brynjolfsson, Daniel Rock and Chad Syverson have an answer: Wait. It's coming.

Often, when a very versatile new technology comes along, it takes a while before businesses figure out how to use it effectively. Electricity, as economist Paul David has documented, is a classic example. Simply adding electric power to factories made them a bit better, but the real gains came when companies figured out that changing the configuration of factories would allow electricity to dramatically speed production.

Machine learning, Brynjolfsson et al. say, will be much the same. Because it's such a general-purpose technology, companies will eventually find whole new ways of doing business that are built around it. On the production side, they'll move beyond obvious things like driverless cars, and create new gadgets and services that we can only dream of. And machine learning will also lead to other new technologies, just as computer technology and the internet led to machine learning.

If Brynjolfsson et al. are right, then those who have dismissed the rise-of-the-robots story are in for a nasty shock. That phenomenon could just be getting started."
from instapaper
25 days ago
Four ethical priorities for neurotechnologies and AI
"Privacy and consent. An extraordinary level of personal information can already be obtained from people's data trails. Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, for example, discovered in 2015 that fine-grained analysis of people's motor behaviour, revealed through their keyboard typing patterns on personal devices, could enable earlier diagnosis of Parkinson's disease. A 2017 study suggests that measures of mobility patterns, such as those obtained from people carrying smartphones during their normal daily activities, can be used to diagnose early signs of cognitive impairment resulting from Alzheimer's disease.

Algorithms that are used to target advertising, calculate insurance premiums or match potential partners will be considerably more powerful if they draw on neural information — for instance, activity patterns from neurons associated with certain states of attention. And neural devices connected to the Internet open up the possibility of individuals or organizations (hackers, corporations or government agencies) tracking or even manipulating an individual's mental experience.

We believe that citizens should have the ability — and right — to keep their neural data private (see also 'Agency and identity')"
from instapaper
25 days ago
Daniel Kahneman - Why We Contradict Ourselves & Confound Each Other
"Daniel Kahneman: When I ask you about something that you believe in — whether you believe or don’t believe in climate change or whether you believe in some political position or other — as soon as I raise the question why, you have answers. Reasons come to your mind. But the reasons may have very little to do with the real causes of your beliefs. And we take the reasons that people give for their actions and beliefs, and our own reasons for our actions and beliefs, much too seriously."
from instapaper
26 days ago
Clay Christensen sticks with predictions of massive college closures | Inside Higher Ed
"A degree from Christensen's institution, Harvard Business School, costs nearly $400,000, he said, and that price point has made it such that the only people who can afford it are would-be McKinsey consultants, hedge fund managers and the like. "Our customers need so much money in opening salary to pay off their debt that we have overshot the salaries" that most companies can pay.

The number of prospective students taking the business school entrance exam is "going off the cliff," and the men and women who might have gone to business school are now turning to corporations' own "universities" and other alternative providers.

These alternative providers are doing what too few traditional institutions, as the legacy providers trying to protect their existing business models, are willing to do, Christensen said: "let the students learn when they're ready and how they want to learn, not when and how we're ready to teach them."

Millions of would-be students are in the "periphery," people who "have never been able to get the education they need" -- a certification or other experience to succeed in the work force."
from instapaper
27 days ago
In the loop: Jony Ive on Apple’s new HQ and the disappearing iPhone | Design | Wallpaper* Magazine
"‘When I look back over the last 25 years, in some ways what seems most precious is not what we have made but how we have made it and what we have learned as a consequence of that,’ he says. ‘I always think that there are two products at the end of a programme; there is the physical product or the service, the thing that you have managed to make, and then there is all that you have learned. The power of what you have learned enables you to do the next thing and it enables you to do the next thing better."
from instapaper
4 weeks ago
Is the Retreat from Marriage Due to Cheap Sex, Men’s Waning Job Prospects, or Both?
"Regnerus is right that the ability to have sex with few strings attached is one reason couples in all social classes increasingly delay marriage. But why is the retreat from marriage much steeper for those with low or moderate education? Cheap sex can hardly explain this class divergence because access to sex in early adulthood is just as great for those who become college graduates. For many farther down the class hierarchy, men’s economic woes are also key barriers to getting or staying married."
from instapaper
4 weeks ago
Is the Retreat from Marriage Due to Cheap Sex, Men’s Waning Job Prospects, or Both?
"The pill is clearly not the whole story of why age at first marriage increased, however, since recent research of mine with Larry Wu and Steven Martin showed that approximately 40 to 50% of women born in the late 1930s and early 1940s had premarital sex, despite coming of age before the birth control pill was widely available. Consistent with the role of the pill facilitating premarital sex is the finding that there was a steep increase in premarital sex between those born in the early 1940s and those born in the next two decades, reaching 80% of those born in the 1960s. Thus, I agree with Regnerus’ claim that the pill’s facilitation of more worry-free sex contributed to delaying marriage. One of the reasons that many of our grandparents married by age 20 was undoubtedly to be able to have sex; with the pill, later marriage became more compelling."
from instapaper
4 weeks ago
The tension between creativity and productivity
"I was chatting with a friend on the phone today about a talk we’re doing together in a couple weeks and she brought up the same issue, unprompted. She’s a naturally productive person who finds herself with some free time, yet she’s finding it difficult to not stay busy, even though she knows she needs the mind-wandering time to replenish her creative reserves. I struggle with the same thing. I get more done in less time than I ever have, but sometimes I feel like there’s nothing creative about my work anymore. Sure, I make the doughnuts every day but am not inventing the cronut. How do you accomplish your work but also leave ample time for letting your creative mind off the leash?"
from instapaper
4 weeks ago
The tension between creativity and productivity
"And that means that undertaking new things, speculative things that have no proven value to any of the domains where I work (let alone all of them) has gotten progressively harder, even as I’ve grown more productive. Optimization is a form of calcification."
from instapaper
4 weeks ago
For irreligious evangelicals, Christianity is about politics—not God
"Consider also the astonishing results of two recent polls by the Public Religion Research Institute. In 2011, the institute asked voters if “an elected official who commits an immoral act in their personal life can still behave ethically and fulfill their duties in their public and professional life.” Only 30% of white evangelical Protestants agreed that a politician’s personal life had no bearing on their public performance.

But by July of 2017, 70% of white evangelicals said they would be willing to separate the public and personal. It was a “head-spinning reversal,” said the PRRI CEO—with white evangelicals flipping from being the least to most likely group to agree that candidates’ personal immorality has no bearing on their public role.

The results suggest that many self-described evangelicals no longer embrace a spirit of humility, sexual fidelity, and care for those whom Jesus called “the least of these.” Rather, God is invoked to justify preserving the social order or, as in the recent evangelical leaders’ Nashville Statement, to condemn same-sex attractions and marriage. As William James wrote a century ago, sometimes, “Piety is the mask.”"
from instapaper
5 weeks ago
How to Have a Better Relationship
"Here’s the good news: A minority of couples with children — about 20 percent — manage to stay happy in their relationships despite the kids.

What’s their secret? Top three predictors of a happy marriage among parents

Sexual Intimacy
Commitment
Generosity
So there you have it. The secret to surviving parenthood is to have lots of sex, be faithful and be generous toward your partner. In this case, generosity isn’t financial — it’s about the sharing, caring and kind gestures you make toward your partner every day. When you are trying to survive the chaos of raising kids, it’s the little things — like bringing your partner coffee, offering to pick up the dry cleaning or do the dishes, that can make all the difference in the health of your relationship."
from instapaper
5 weeks ago
How to Have a Better Relationship
"In one important study, Dr. Gottman and his colleagues observed newly married couples in the midst of an argument. He learned that the topic didn’t matter, nor did the duration of the fight. What was most predictive of the couple’s marital health? The researchers found that analyzing just the first three minutes of the couple’s argument could predict their risk for divorce over the next six years."
from instapaper
5 weeks ago
How to Have a Better Relationship
"Couples were given relationship tests before and after the experiment. Those who had taken part in the challenging activity posted greater increases in love and relationship satisfaction than those who had not experienced victory together.The researchers theorize that couples who explore new places and try new things will tap into feelings of self-expansion, lifting their level of commitment."
from instapaper
5 weeks ago
How to Have a Better Relationship
"Terry Hatkoff, a California State University sociologist, has created a love scale that identifies six distinct types of love found in our closest relationships.

Romantic: Based on passion and sexual attraction
Best Friends: Fondness and deep affection
Logical: Practical feelings based on shared values, financial goals, religion etc.
Playful: Feelings evoked by flirtation or feeling challenged
Possessive: Jealousy and obsession
Unselfish: Nurturing, kindness, and sacrifice
Researchers have found that the love we feel in our most committed relationships is typically a combination of two or three different forms of love. But often, two people in the same relationship can have very different versions of how they define love. Dr. Hatkoff gives the example of a man and woman having dinner. The waiter flirts with the woman, but the husband doesn’t seem to notice, and talks about changing the oil in her car. The wife is upset her husband isn’t jealous. The husband feels his extra work isn’t appreciated."
from instapaper
5 weeks ago
Opinion | Generation Sell
"Affability is a commercial virtue, but it is also the affect of people who feel themselves to be living in a fundamentally agreeable society. Already, the makings of a new youth culture may be locking into place."
from instapaper
5 weeks ago
Opinion | Generation Sell
"Hipsters and bobos are symbiotic. I should know; I’m a bobo in a hipster-bobo neighborhood — which is pretty much what I was looking for when I moved to Portland in the first place. We’re all into organic food and progressive politics; we just have different relationships to the commodities through which those attitudes are expressed. Hipsters create bobo culture. They make or sell or serve, or simply pioneer, what bobos buy. Try to picture Allen Ginsberg having a chat with Don Draper, across the counter at the local coffeehouse, about the latest Lady Gaga video, and you’ll realize how far we’ve come.

All this is why, unlike those of previous youth cultures, the hipster ethos contains no element of rebellion, rejection or dissent — remarkably so, given that countercultural opposition would seem to be essential to the very idea of youth culture. That may in turn be why the hipster has proved to be so durable. The heyday of the hippies lasted for all of about two years. The punks and slackers held the stage for little more than half a decade each. That’s the nature of rebellion: it needs to keep on happening. The punks rejected the mainstream, but they also rejected the previous rejection, hippiedom itself — which, by the late ’70s, was something that old people (i.e. 28-year-olds) were into. But hipsters, who’ve been around for 15 years or so, appear to have become a durable part of our cultural configuration."
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5 weeks ago
Opinion | Generation Sell
"It’s striking. Forty years ago, even 20 years ago, a young person’s first thought, or even second or third thought, was certainly not to start a business. That was selling out — an idea that has rather tellingly disappeared from our vocabulary. Where did it come from, this change? Less Reaganism, as a former student suggested to me, than Clintonism — the heroic age of dot-com entrepreneurship that emerged during the Millennials’ childhood and youth. Add a distrust of large organizations, including government, as well as the sense, a legacy of the last decade, that it’s every man for himself."
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5 weeks ago
Opinion | Generation Sell
"Today’s ideal social form is not the commune or the movement or even the individual creator as such; it’s the small business. Every artistic or moral aspiration — music, food, good works, what have you — is expressed in those terms.

Call it Generation Sell.

Bands are still bands, but now they’re little businesses, as well: self-produced, self-published, self-managed. When I hear from young people who want to get off the careerist treadmill and do something meaningful, they talk, most often, about opening a restaurant. Nonprofits are still hip, but students don’t dream about joining one, they dream about starting one. In any case, what’s really hip is social entrepreneurship — companies that try to make money responsibly, then give it all away."
from instapaper
5 weeks ago
Our Education Efforts Are Evolving
"We expect that about 25 percent of our funding in the next five years will focus on big bets – innovations with the potential to change the trajectory of public education over the next 10 to 15 years.

The conditions for developing and spreading new approaches in education, particularly technology-enabled ones, are better than ever. Broadband access in schools is reaching 90 percent. Students and teachers have access to more affordable and more powerful tools for learning. Educators are seeking each other out and sharing ideas in digital communities. And there are promising developments in neuroscience, cognitive psychology, and behavioral economics.

But the PreK-12 research, development and translation ecosystem is underfunded and fragmented, with less than 1 percent of total government spending in public education focused on R&D.

Math is one area where we want to generate stronger evidence about what works. What would it take, for example, to get all kids to mastery of Algebra I? What kinds of intelligent tools do teachers and students need to get there? And how might we design these in partnership with the best math teachers in the country?

We are also interested in what role we can play to prepare students for the dramatic changes underway in the workforce. We have to make work-related experiences a consistent part of high schools in ways that build student engagement and relevant skills, and that put young people on a path to credentials with labor market value in our future economy."
from instapaper
5 weeks ago
The Age of Consent and Its Discontents
"Rather it’s everything else, the failure of ordinary relations between the sexes, that indicts our present order and suggests that we need a different way — either the greater radicalism and utopianism urged by the most rigorous and consistent left-feminists, or else a return to ideas about restraint that were taken for granted in the past not because people were blind or bigoted, but because they made a better fit with human nature and human flourishing than where we’ve ended up."
from instapaper
5 weeks ago
The Age of Consent and Its Discontents
"This means that conservatives arguing for a different, thicker sexual ethic than just the rule of “consent” need to recognize that any revived code of sexual restraint would need to draw on the insights of feminism as well as those of pre-sexual revolution sources, lest it fall back into the sins of patriarchy once again. And it means that the depredations of Weinstein and his ilk may be suggestive evidence of our system’s flaws, but they aren’t necessarily the best evidence that it’s actively failing and should be reformed or overthrown."
from instapaper
5 weeks ago
How Word Choice Can Cultivate Optimism and Improve Health
"For example, a doctor whose patient is an initiator personality might frame a discussion about recovery as, “What are you going to do?” But with a responder personality, the doctor might frame the same conversation by saying, “How are you going to respond?”

It’s a subtle but critical difference, Briley says, adding that words matter much more than we realize."
from instapaper
5 weeks ago
How Word Choice Can Cultivate Optimism and Improve Health
"The paper, titled “Cultivating Optimism: How to Frame Your Future During a Health Challenge,” involved studies using more than 1,300 subjects, including flood victims and patients battling cancer, across different cultures. The results show that optimism can be best nurtured by understanding how a patient thinks about his or her health challenge, and framing that challenge for the patient in a way that increases their chances of being hopeful about the outcome.

A key way to help a patient clearly see a path to recovery is to understand how they view the world. “Are they an ‘initiator,’ the kind of person who focuses on how they will act regardless of the situation, or a ‘responder,’ the kind of person who focuses on how they’ll react to situations they encounter?” Briley says."
from instapaper
5 weeks ago
Fashion, Maslow and Facebook's control of social
"Hence, one of the ways I describe Facebook is that it is extremely good at surfing user behaviour - it tries to work out where users are going and go with them, whereas Snap tries much more to try to get ahead of this. In different ways both of these are also what a great designer does, and, likewise, Bismarck said that the great statesman listens for the footsteps of god walking through history and tries to grab onto his coat as he passes. Of course, for Facebook that sometimes means creating things (and here the surf metaphor breaks a little, as you can't shape the wave), even things that users say they don't like. Dior's New Look made people angry and so did the original newsfeed itself. But then, fashion designers create looks all the times - that doesn't mean they can make anyone wear it. You can shape things, sometimes. You can ride and channel the trend. But I think we attribute vastly too much power to a handful of product managers in Menlo Park, and vastly too little power to the billions of people who look at their phone screen and wonder which app to open. Facebook writes algorithms, and designers cut the cloth, but that doesn't mean they control what people look at or what people wear."
from instapaper
5 weeks ago
End of Apartheid in South Africa? Not in Economic Terms
"Underlying the anger are deep-seated disparities in wealth. In the aftermath of apartheid, the government left land and other assets largely in the hands of a predominantly white elite. The government’s resistance to large-scale land transfers reflected its reluctance to rattle international investors.

Today, millions of black South Africans are chronically short of capital needed to start businesses. Less than half of the working age population is officially employed.

The governing party, the African National Congress, built empires of new housing for black South Africans, but concentrated it in the townships, reinforcing the geographic strictures of apartheid. Large swaths of the black population remain hunkered down in squalor, on land they do not legally own. Those with jobs often endure commutes of an hour or more on private minibuses that extract outsize slices of their paychecks."
from instapaper
5 weeks ago
Why Americans have stopped eating leftovers
"American consumers throw away 27 million tons of food each year, according to the food waste coalition ReFED, clogging landfills, generating greenhouse gasses, and costing the economy an estimated $144 billion.

The solution, however, could be simple: get people to eat leftovers again.

Once the mainstay of weekday lunchboxes and thrifty home cooks, leftovers today constitute the single largest source of edible food waste in U.S. homes, according to a new study by the Natural Resources Defense Council, an environmental group."
from instapaper
5 weeks ago
College Scholarship Tycoon: a game of improving school ranking without discriminating against the poor
"The player's manual

College Scholarship Tycoon is a game where you’re asked to move your college up the rankings — but striking the wrong balance might force you to reject poor kids who really need college to give them a shot at a better life.

Table of contents

There are two primary parts to the game.

Who to accept? You see 10 student applications, with various family incomes and test scores. You can choose to accept students with good test scores who are more likely to have higher incomes, or you can choose to accept lower-scoring students who tend to have lower incomes.

Who to give financial aid? You have a limited about of aid. Do you give it to poor students who need it? Or to more affluent students who you want to attract to the school? A better aid package will attract the high-achieving students who will improve your rankings, but they also don’t need the money as much."
from instapaper
5 weeks ago
Baltimore is more murderous than Chicago. Can anyone save the city from itself?
"One of the biggest problems remains, however: building trust between Baltimoreans and those supposed to protect them."
from instapaper
5 weeks ago
Baltimore is more murderous than Chicago. Can anyone save the city from itself?
"In 2017 so far, 297 homicides have been recorded. The city is on a pace to break its record of 353 murders in 1993 when Baltimore, population 614,000, had 113,000 more residents than it does now.

The old port city has become one of the most violent major cities in the US, with twice the per-capita homicide rate of Chicago and more total murders than New York City, which counts 8.5 million residents.

More than 90% of the Baltimore murder victims are black. Most killings are drug- or gang-related, but not all: there’s the mother shot to death in front of her children in June in retaliation for reporting bullying and a stolen bicycle seat, or the 97-year-old man found dead in his East Baltimore home in July. A few weeks before that, Dion Smith, the younger brother of Baltimore police department’s chief spokesman, TJ Smith, was also shot dead."
from instapaper
5 weeks ago
Is Amazon getting into the pharmacy business? This is what you need to know
"Those who are skeptical of Amazon’s potential pharmacy entry have noted Amazon’s difficulty breaking into highly regulated markets, including alcohol distribution in the U.S.

Industry leaders have brought up similar points. For one, CVS Health Corp. CVS, +0.69% Chief Executive Larry Merlo told Wall Street analysts in August that his industry was “highly regulated, so the barriers to entry are high.”"
from instapaper
6 weeks ago
'Our minds can be hijacked': the tech insiders who fear a smartphone dystopia
"That would be a remarkable assertion for any early investor in Silicon Valley’s most profitable behemoths. But McNamee, 61, is more than an arms-length money man. Once an adviser to Mark Zuckerberg, 10 years ago McNamee introduced the Facebook CEO to his friend, Sheryl Sandberg, then a Google executive who had overseen the company’s advertising efforts. Sandberg, of course, became chief operating officer at Facebook, transforming the social network into another advertising heavyweight.

McNamee chooses his words carefully. “The people who run Facebook and Google are good people, whose well-intentioned strategies have led to horrific unintended consequences,” he says. “The problem is that there is nothing the companies can do to address the harm unless they abandon their current advertising models.”"
from instapaper
6 weeks ago
Twitter
RT : Analizando el ejercicio de negociación con en
from twitter_favs
7 weeks ago
Read more than you write, live more than you read
Last night I was reading a new book by a writer I admire and a voice in my head kept asking, “How? How is he so good?” and another voice kept replying, “Because, he’s lived longer, thought harder, and written more than you, you buffoon.” (Factoring out in-born talent, of course.)

It reminded me of Junot Diaz, who, when pressed for advice, said, “Read more than you write, live more than you read.”
reading  life 
7 weeks ago
Don’t Blame Apple For Your Slow iPhone. Blame Apps
"Hue and cry about Apple’s “planned obsolescence” has burbled up for years, at one point gracing even the pages of The New York Times Magazine. But a new look at historic iPhone performance data disproves the notion for good. Does your iPhone run a little slower than it used to, just in time for the iPhone 8? Maybe. If you’re blaming Apple, though, you’re barking up the wrong corporate monolith."
from instapaper
8 weeks ago
Facts Don't Change People's Minds. Here's What Does
"In my early years in academia, I would tend to get defensive when someone challenged one of my arguments during a presentation. My heart rate would skyrocket, I would tense up, and my answer would reflect the disdain with which I viewed the antagonistic question (and the questioner).

I know I’m not alone here. We all tend to identify with our beliefs and arguments.

This is my business.

This is my article.

This is my idea.

But here’s the problem. When your beliefs are entwined with your identity, changing your mind means changing your identity. That’s a really hard sell.

A possible solution, and one that I’ve adopted in my own life, is to put a healthy separation between you and the products of you. I changed my vocabulary to reflect this mental shift. At conferences, instead of saying, “In this paper, I argue . . .,” I began to say “This paper argues . . ."
from instapaper
8 weeks ago
The Power of Anti-Goals
"So, instead of thinking through what we wanted our perfect day to look like, we thought about the worst day imaginable and how to avoid it. We inverted and came up with what we call Anti-Goals.

Our worst possible day looked like this:

Full of long meetings
A packed calendar
Dealing with people we don’t like or trust
Owing people things / not being in control / obligations
Having to be at the office
Travel
Tired
Working backwards from there, we made this set of Anti-Goals:

Never schedule an in-person meeting when it can otherwise be accomplished via email or phone (or not at all)
No more than 2 hours of scheduled time per day
No business or obligations with people we don’t like—even just a slight bad vibe and it’s a hard no
Never give up voting control of our businesses, no favors from people who could need something from us (ensure the rule of reciprocity doesn’t kick in)
Work from a cafe across from a beautiful park where we can come and go as we please with nobody to bother us
Video conference or pay for people to come visit us
Never schedule morning meetings, sleep in when needed"
from instapaper
8 weeks ago
the rad-trads and ecumenical hope – Snakes and Ladders
"First, the collapse of liberal Catholicism — which Deneen in the essay takes as a given — has, it’s safe to say, been postponed. I doubt Deneen would see any substantive reason to question his belief that “Liberal Catholicism has no future — like liberal Protestantism, it is fated to become liberalism simpliciter within a generation”; but that leaves unanswered the question of whether “liberalism simpliciter” could come to run the Catholic Church, at least for a while. In any event, that’s an intra-Catholic issue and not one that I’m concerned with here. (Though I have my preferences about how it all falls out.)"
from instapaper
8 weeks ago
What is this a case of? An interview with Jerry Davis
"With Yong Hyun Kim, a doctoral student of mine, we saw this as an opportunity to dig into these reports to see which companies are able to figure out whether they are contributing to conflict in the DRC. And the shocking thing is that of the 1,300 companies that filed these reports the first year, only 1% were able to say, with a reasonable degree of certainty, that they were not inadvertently funding conflict in the DRC. It’s like what the heck? To me this is one of those instances of a bigger thing. Contemporary capitalism has led corporations to disperse their supply chains all over the world. Now, suppose you want to buy products that don’t contribute to genocide, can you do that? Companies had three, four years to figure this out, and a bunch of consultants helping them, they still can’t do it. To me, this is fascinating and it sheds some new light on the nature of contemporary capitalism. That’s an instance of “what is this a case of?” It’s a case of having a portfolio of topics on hand. Then Dodd Frank comes out, data become available and so now, we can actually get some insight into supply chains that wasn’t possible before."
from instapaper
8 weeks ago
RW's Training Pace Calculator - Runner's World
"Yasso 800s
Yasso 800s are an invention of Runner's World US writer Bart Yasso, who has run more than 50 marathons and ultramarathons. They're simple: if you want to run a marathon in 2:45, 3:29 or 4:11, you should train to the point where you can run 10 repetitions of 800 metres in the same time: 2:45, 3:29 or 4:11. The only difference is that your marathon time is hours:minutes and your 800 time is minutes:seconds. Bart suggests doing Yasso 800s once a week as part of your marathon training. Start with perhaps 4 x 800 and build up to 10 x 800. Between the 800s, take a recovery jog that lasts as long as your 800s. A good Yasso 800 workout: 6 x 800m at Yasso pace with recovery jogs between the 800s."
from instapaper
8 weeks ago
The "Michigan" Workout May Kill You, But You Should Run It Anyway
"When I decided to give the Michigan a shot, I decided to break it down like this: Laps go 4-3-2-1 — the first half at 10K pace, the second at 5K — all interspersed with those tempo miles. To figure out my paces, I used this pace calculator from Runner’s World UK, basing everything on my recent finish time at the Brooklyn Half-Marathon, and factored in my recent times at a biweekly 5K series I love. (Also: 10K paces are said to be 20 seconds per mile slower than 5K paces.) I even made this shareable Google Doc to plan everything out, then printed it and completely forgot to bring it with me on training day."
from instapaper
8 weeks ago
There Is No One Way to Live a Good Life - Scientific American Blog Network
"Robert Vallerand and his colleagues have shown quite convincingly that those who change in romantic relationships in ways conducive to growth and health are precisely those who engage in relationships that allow the individual to remain engaged in other spheres of life (i.e., friends, family, hobbies) outside the relationship. This is also consistent with the notion that "role engulfment"-- in which a person's identity is based entirely on one specific role (e.g., helping others), superseding all other roles, sets the stage for role abandonment, or detachment from other things that make life worth living. The same applies to the self. Self engulfment will naturally lead to self abandonment, which is not a healthy state of affairs for one's self or for the world."
from instapaper
8 weeks ago
There Is No One Way to Live a Good Life - Scientific American Blog Network
"Maslow was a great admirer of Fromm (as am I), and this essay by Fromm inspired Maslow to write an unpublished essay in which he clearly distinguishes between selfish behaviors and selfish motivations. Not everything that looks like "helping" is healthy, and not everything that appears "selfish" is unhealthy.

In fact, my colleagues and I have been investigating the implications of individual differences in both pathological altruism (the need to give in a way that causes harm to self and/or others) as well as healthy selfishness (engaging in self-care without any damage to others). The data is just starting to come in, and I'm sure I'll write much more about this later, but so far we are seeing that there are serious unhealthy developmental consequences to growing up constantly told that you must put your own needs aside, and "surrender" yourself to others. In fact, we are finding some striking clinical implications, in that high levels of pathological altruism are predicting things like depression and quite vulnerable forms of narcissism very strongly, whereas healthy selfishness is predicting a wide range of growth-related variables, including positive social relationships and greater meaning and purpose in life.

So contrary to Brooks, it appears that the reality is that too much focus on sacrificing your own needs makes it less likely that you will be motivated to help others!"
from instapaper
8 weeks ago
Good Vegan, Bad Vegan
"Those choosing a strict vegan diet — one devoid of all foods from animals — face a greater challenge because the protein in plants is not complete and must be balanced by consuming complementary sources, like beans and grains. A sandwich of almond butter or peanut butter on whole-grain bread is totally vegan and an excellent example of balanced protein in a high-quality plant-based diet. Vegans also must supplement their diet with vitamin B-12.

Short of becoming a vegan, you can improve your diet, protect your health and add variety to your meals by a few simple dietary adjustments. For example, as Dr. Hena Patel and Dr. Kim Allan Williams Sr., cardiologists at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago, suggested in a commentary on the Harvard study, you might choose one day a week to be meatless and gradually add more meatless days while adding one or more new plant-based recipes each week.

I bet you’ll be pleasantly surprised at how much more delicious and varied your meals will be."
from instapaper
8 weeks ago
Why Happy People Cheat
"I often say to my patients that if they could bring into their marriage even one-tenth of the boldness, the playfulness, and the verve that they bring to their affair, their home life would feel quite different. Our creative imagination seems to be richer when it comes to our transgressions than to our commitments. Yet while I say this, I also think back to a poignant scene in the movie A Walk on the Moon. Diane Lane’s character has been having an affair with a free-spirited blouse salesman. Her teenage daughter asks, “You love [him] more than all of us?” “No,” the mother replies, but “sometimes it’s easier to be different with a different person.”"
from instapaper
8 weeks ago
Push vs. Pull Processes
"Postscript from the Comments: The 7 Wastes of Toyota

Jeffrey K. Liker, author of The Toyota Way, says that Toyota has identified seven primary types of non value-adding waste in its business: over-production, motion (of operator or machine), waiting (of operator or machine), conveyance, processing itself, inventory (raw material), and correction (rework and scrap). Liker included an 8th waste (a personal favorite)—untapped employee creativity.

I have adapted Toyota and Liker’s lists for our purposes. So that they relate, not to a manufacturing process, but to a service business:

• Overstaffing—hiring people for whom there is not enough work.

• Overproduction—producing items (work) for which there are no clients or orders.

• Waiting—for information, resources, supplies, anything that slows down flow and creates waste.

• Over-processing or incorrect processing—activity, conversations, or processes that are not necessary or are incorrectly executed.

• Unused employee creativity—not enlisting and empowering your team, both intellectually and emotionally, in a continuous process of improvement."
from instapaper
8 weeks ago
How to take a nap
"But my favorite nap, the one that really leaves me feeling like a million bucks, is the one described by Philip Roth:

Let me tell you about the nap. It’s absolutely fantastic. When I was a kid, my father was always trying to tell me how to be a man. And he said – I was maybe nine – he said, Philip, whenever you take a nap, take your clothes off and put a blanket over you and you’re going to sleep better. Well, as with everything, he was right. And so I now do that and I come back from the swimming pool I go to and I have my lunch and I read the paper and I take this glorious thing called a nap. And then the best part of it is that when you wake up, for the first 15 seconds you have no idea where you are. You’re just alive. That’s all you know and it’s bliss. It’s absolute bliss."
from instapaper
8 weeks ago
Why Happy People Cheat
"“I’ve always been good. Good daughter, good wife, good mother. Dutiful. Straight A’s.” Coming from a traditional family of modest means, for Priya, What do I want? has never been separated from What do they want from me? She never partied, drank, or stayed out late, and she smoked her first joint at 22. After college, she married the right guy, and helped to support her family, as so many children of immigrant parents do. Now she is left with a nagging question: If I’m not perfect, will they still love me? A voice in her head wonders what life is like for those who are not so “good.” Are they more lonely? More free? Do they have more fun?

Priya’s affair is neither a symptom nor a pathology; it’s a crisis of identity, an internal rearrangement of her personality. In our sessions, we talk about duty and desire, about age and youth. Her daughters are becoming teenagers and enjoying a freedom she never knew. Priya is at once supportive and envious. As she nears the mid-century mark, she is having her own belated adolescent rebellion."
from instapaper
8 weeks ago
Why Happy People Cheat
"As I listen to her, I start to suspect that her affair is about neither her husband nor their relationship. Her story echoes a theme that has come up repeatedly in my work: affairs as a form of self-discovery, a quest for a new (or lost) identity. For these seekers, infidelity is less likely to be a symptom of a problem, and more likely an expansive experience that involves growth, exploration, and transformation."
from instapaper
8 weeks ago
How A Pulitzer-Prize Winning Novelist Thinks About Coffee, Screenplays, And Facebook - Writing Routines
"For The Sympathizer, I had a two-page outline for the novel. I just trusted that, chapter to chapter, I would figure out what I was doing. Whereas with the novel that I’m writing now I had so much time to think about it. I didn’t have a chance to write fiction for two or three years after The Sympathizer, so I took down all these notes. I ended up with like 60 pages of notes on this novel, so it’s a very different place to be starting from."
from instapaper
8 weeks ago
How A Pulitzer-Prize Winning Novelist Thinks About Coffee, Screenplays, And Facebook - Writing Routines
"What I like to do is edit a chapter before I move onto the next one. So for The Sympathizer I would write 20-25 pages of a chapter in draft form, and the goal would just be to write the pages knowing that they were terrible. Some writers just keep on going, and they write the whole novel that way. But I stopped because I wanted to pay so much attention to the prose so I needed to make the prose as perfect as I could before I moved forward. I would just write the chapter to get the plot down and go back and revise a couple of times before I moved onto the next chapter. By the time I finished The Sympathizer, even though it was technically the first draft, it had already been revised along the way, so I only needed to revise that draft one more time before I turned it over to my agent. Then when my editor got his hands on it we revised it one more time after that."
from instapaper
8 weeks ago
How A Pulitzer-Prize Winning Novelist Thinks About Coffee, Screenplays, And Facebook - Writing Routines
"One of the best writing tips I ever heard—and multiple writers have said this so I can’t remember who I heard it from—is to stop at a high point in your writing. Stop when you’re still feeling energetic, when you’re still feeling good. Even stop in the middle of a paragraph or sentence so that you can pick up where you left off the next day."
from instapaper
8 weeks ago
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