newyorker.com
"We say that we “decide” to get married, to have children, to live in particular cities or embark on particular careers, and in a sense this is true. But how do we actually make those choices? One of the paradoxes of life is that our big decisions are often less calculated than our small ones are. We agonize over what to stream on Netflix, then let TV shows persuade us to move to New York; buying a new laptop may involve weeks of Internet research, but the deliberations behind a life-changing breakup could consist of a few bottles of wine. We’re hardly more advanced than the ancient Persians, who, Herodotus says, made big decisions by discussing them twice: once while drunk, once while sober."
from instapaper
2 days ago
Twitter
Do state level campaign finance laws lead to lower levels of corruption? I present my efforts to answer this questi…
from twitter_favs
3 days ago
Twitter
Opinion: 'Medicare for all' could be revolutionary for the uninsured, but we must first ask tough questions about t…
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9 days ago
Hidden figures: The quiet discipline of managing people using data
"A key first step is to identify the human component of business challenges and opportunities, and build an analytics engine to collect data and validate hypotheses on performance drivers. For example, in a corporate bank, analytics on calendar metadata may help pinpoint the interaction patterns related to deal success. While in payments, data and analytics can enable faster and more nuanced hiring of the right combination of technical and “soft” skills. Deploying analytics to create transparency into what matters—for leaders, managers, and employees—empowers them to cut through the noise and focus on what really matters."
from instapaper
10 days ago
Hidden figures: The quiet discipline of managing people using data
"We predict that winners will go beyond deploying “off the shelf” assessments to develop evidence-based models supporting the knowledge, skills, attributes, and experiences required to successfully deliver on a specific role in its unique environment. This can be accomplished through closed loop machine learning to pinpoint what factors distinguish high performers from the rest, or science-based forensics on future work required, which informs objective screening criteria to be assessed through science-backed interviews and digital assessments, gamified or otherwise.

High performers are often at the highest risk of attrition, given their multitude of outside options. Data and analytics can serve as an early warning and mitigation system by predicting attrition risk at both individual and group levels and developing effective responses to address the root cause. For instance, using k-medoid and majority vote classification techniques, one financial institution found that attrition was elevated among three different groups—millennials seeking professional growth, employees working in larger teams, and those working for low-tenured managers. Leveraging this data-driven employee segmentation, the organization developed tailored preventive measures to reduce attrition for each of the clusters."
from instapaper
10 days ago
Hidden figures: The quiet discipline of managing people using data
"One financial services firm found it could increase field effectiveness by systematically testing and recruiting for character traits such as curiosity and de-emphasizing humility, which was found to be underrepresented among its high performers. Another applied a predictive modeling technique called elastic net regularization to hire more employees with character traits similar to those of existing high performers, reallocating recruiting dollars to particular schools and majors and disintermediating headhunters in approaching high-potential candidates"
from instapaper
10 days ago
Hidden figures: The quiet discipline of managing people using data
"For instance, firms like Aegis Worldwide conduct text message-based initial interviews to reduce bias and enable algorithmic analysis of answers. Unilever uses technology across its whole recruiting process; it begins by using LinkedIn profiles instead of résumés, deploying AI to select the best prospects. Next, it uses a series of online games to further narrow the field to a select few candidates for in-person interviews. The results are convincing: Using this approach Unilever tripled the roster of universities from which it recruits while reducing its average hiring cycle from four months to four weeks. McKinsey’s own use of artificial intelligence to screen résumés not only delivered 30 to 50 percent increases in hiring efficiency (reflecting a 400 to 500 percent ROI), but also drove an increase in the share of women candidates passing initial screening."
from instapaper
10 days ago
Hidden figures: The quiet discipline of managing people using data
"Leveraging internal and third-party data allow firms to quantify organizational skills deficits, target opportunities for re-skilling (through methods such as hierarchical clustering or cosine similarity), and identify the skills to source externally. A 2017 McKinsey Global Institute report on automation, employment, and productivity showed that 43 percent of all finance and insurance activities can be automated through currently available technology. The aforementioned McKinsey study on the future of work in financial institutions found that one-third of existing talent gaps can be addressed by re-skilling current employees. One client established a best-practice adult-learning program, combining both in-house and external learning, and retrained more than 1,000 employees into new internet of things, analytics, and machine learning roles within the first ten months of the program. Winners in automation transformations pinpoint capability requirements and make the proper call on where to buy (source), build (re-skill), and rent (outsource or shift to contractors)."
from instapaper
10 days ago
The Quantified Workplace: Despite the Hype, Not All That Useful Yet - The Atlantic
But as the industry grows, big questions remain about what can be done with this newly discovered trove of data. Bersin's research shows that only four percent of large companies can make meaningful predictions about their workforces, while 90 percent can accurately predict business metrics such as budgets, financial results, and expenses. Can human-resources analytics do enough to capture the behavior and preferences of its endlessly complex subjects: humans?

"It’s one of the few areas of business that hasn’t really been figured out yet," says Bersin. "People are imperfect machines. Nobody ever figures out people completely."
talentanalytics 
10 days ago
Introduction to People Analytics - Introduction to People Analytics, and Performance Evaluation | Coursera
"So people analytics is really just the use of data and
analytic tools to make better decisions about how we manage people.
So a lot of the energy around people analytics are stemmed from two places.
One is obviously this interest in if we can manage our people better,
it's obviously gonna benefit the organization.
The second place it comes from is the sense that we now have more and
more data about what people are doing that we could actually put at the service
of these decisions."
from instapaper
12 days ago
The Machine Learning Race Is Really a Data Race
"The step that many organizations omit is creating a hypothesis about what matters. Where machine learning really excels is taking an insight that humans have — one based on rules of thumb, broad perceptions, or poorly understood relationships — and developing a faster, better understood, more scalable (and less error-prone) method for applying the insight.

In order to use machine learning in this way, you don’t feed the system every known data point in any related field. You feed it a carefully curated set of knowledge, hoping it can learn, and perhaps extend, at the margins, knowledge that people already have."
from instapaper
13 days ago
The Machine Learning Race Is Really a Data Race
"There is a robust cohort of plug-and-play solutions to painlessly accomplish the heavy programmatic lifting, from the open-source machine learning framework of Google’s TensorFlow to Microsoft’s Azure Machine Learning and Amazon’s SageMaker."
from instapaper
13 days ago
Firm Led by Google Veterans Uses A.I. to ‘Nudge’ Workers Toward Happiness
"One major challenge for the company is handling data and artificial intelligence in the sensitive area of human resources. Humu said its software was built with employee privacy in mind, allowing workers to delete personal data, including anonymous comments made in company surveys. Humu said it complied with Europe’s stringent data privacy rules."
from instapaper
13 days ago
Firm Led by Google Veterans Uses A.I. to ‘Nudge’ Workers Toward Happiness
"Using machine learning, Humu will tailor the timing, content and techniques of the messages it delivers based on how employees respond.

“Often we want to be better people,” said Laszlo Bock, Humu’s chief executive and Google’s former leader of what the company calls people operations, or human resources. “We want to be the person we hope we can be. But we need to be reminded. A nudge can have a powerful impact if correctly deployed on how people behave and on human performance.”"
from instapaper
13 days ago
Firm Led by Google Veterans Uses A.I. to ‘Nudge’ Workers Toward Happiness
"Humu wants to bring similar data-driven insights to other companies. It digs through employee surveys using artificial intelligence to identify one or two behavioral changes that are likely to make the biggest impact on elevating a work force’s happiness. Then it uses emails and text messages to “nudge” individual employees into small actions that advance the larger goal."
from instapaper
13 days ago
Andrew Sullivan: America’s New Religions
"Yes, many Evangelicals are among the holiest and most quietly devoted people out there. Some have bravely resisted the cult. But their leaders have turned Christianity into a political and social identity, not a lived faith, and much of their flock — a staggering 81 percent voted for Trump — has signed on. They have tribalized a religion explicitly built by Jesus as anti-tribal. They have turned to idols — including their blasphemous belief in America as God’s chosen country. They have embraced wealth and nationalism as core goods, two ideas utterly anathema to Christ. They are indifferent to the destruction of the creation they say they believe God made. And because their faith is unmoored but their religious impulse is strong, they seek a replacement for religion. This is why they could suddenly rally to a cult called Trump. He may be the least Christian person in America, but his persona met the religious need their own faiths had ceased to provide. The terrible truth of the last three years is that the fresh appeal of a leader-cult has overwhelmed the fading truths of Christianity."
from instapaper
13 days ago
Andrew Sullivan: America’s New Religions
"Now look at our politics. We have the cult of Trump on the right, a demigod who, among his worshippers, can do no wrong. And we have the cult of social justice on the left, a religion whose followers show the same zeal as any born-again Evangelical. They are filling the void that Christianity once owned, without any of the wisdom and culture and restraint that Christianity once provided."
from instapaper
13 days ago
Andrew Sullivan: America’s New Religions
"In his highly entertaining book, The Seven Types of Atheism, released in October in the U.S., philosopher John Gray puts it this way: “Religion is an attempt to find meaning in events, not a theory that tries to explain the universe.” It exists because we humans are the only species, so far as we can know, who have evolved to know explicitly that, one day in the future, we will die. And this existential fact requires some way of reconciling us to it while we are alive.

This is why science cannot replace it. Science does not tell you how to live, or what life is about; it can provide hypotheses and tentative explanations, but no ultimate meaning. Art can provide an escape from the deadliness of our daily doing, but, again, appreciating great art or music is ultimately an act of wonder and contemplation, and has almost nothing to say about morality and life."
from instapaper
14 days ago
After More Than Two Decades of Work, a New Hebrew Bible to Rival the King James
"The art of the biblical narrative, Alter hypothesized, was finalized in a late editorial stage by some unifying creative mind — a figure who, like a film editor, introduced narrative coherence through the art of montage. Alter called this method “composite artistry,” and he would also come to use the term “the Arranger” — a concept borrowed from scholarship on James Joyce — to describe the editor (or editors) who gave the text a final artistic overlay. It was a secular and literary method of reading the Hebrew Bible but, in its reverent insistence on the coherence and complex artistry of the central texts, it has appealed to some religious readers."
from instapaper
17 days ago
Opinion | Who Killed The Weekly Standard? - The New York Times
A great take on the types of personalities that get pulled into business, and the consequences of their mingling

I’ve only been around Phil Anschutz a few times. My impressions on those occasions was that he was a run-of-the-mill arrogant billionaire. He was used to people courting him and he addressed them condescendingly from the lofty height of his own wealth.

I’ve never met Ryan McKibben, who runs part of Anschutz’s media group. But stories about him have circulated around Washington over the years. The stories suggest that he is an ordinary corporate bureaucrat — with all the petty vanities and the lack of interest in ideas that go with the type.
thebook 
21 days ago
The Best Movies of 2018
"By contrast, in the rush to be of the moment, in the self-conscious and vain exertion to capture the times, filmmakers often make movies as disposable as an op-ed, a commentary that converges with the averages and approximations of prevailing attitudes rather than the intimate specificity of experience. It’s easy for filmmakers to treat political matters as cynically as they might approach any dramatic subject—perhaps even easier, because they’re easier to tailor to the expectations of a targeted audience. Many of the year’s most ostensibly “political” films have earned critical praise, they’ll likely get awards, and they can be counted on to have as little effect on current-day politics as they’ll have on the history of cinema."
from instapaper
23 days ago
How Dr. Siddhartha Mukherjee, Cancer Expert, Spends His Sundays
"BOOKWORMS All of us are big readers. In fact, I think our apartment is one giant bookstore with stacks of books everywhere. I read maybe two books a week and multiple ones at the same time. We tend to hit bookstores on Sunday afternoons so we can buy books to add to our collection. Books of Wonder has great children’s books, and I love 192 Books, an independent store which sells all varieties of books. By 4, we’re back home, and a silence falls over the house while everyone is buried in reading."
from instapaper
5 weeks ago
Love, Happiness, and Time
"Rovelli continues:

The difference between things and events is that things persist in time; events have a limited duration. A stone is a prototypical “thing”: we can ask ourselves where it will be tomorrow. Conversely, a kiss is an “event.” It makes no sense to ask where the kiss will be tomorrow. The world is made up of networks of kisses, not of stones.

Will it be more rewarding and useful to conceptualize love and happiness like time? An event, not a thing. A kiss, not a stone.

If you think of love like a stone—to be fair, we often do—it is a thing that you attain. You may have an expectation that it will persist and continue to exist. So when you and your partner fight, and it seems the love disappears for an evening, you panic. The love is gone! The thing that connects you wasn’t permanent at all. What does that say about your relationship?

If we change our thinking to love being an event, like a kiss, then a burden is lifted. It’s an event we experience with our partners many times, but not always. And then we can focus on creating the conditions that the event of love requires, even if it might not come to pass every moment of every day."
from instapaper
5 weeks ago
Everyone Wants to ‘Influence’ You - The New York Times
We like to think of our characters as fixed: We have our beliefs and our morals, religions and parties, states and countries, friends and enemies. We are inevitably ourselves — inescapably ourselves. We should be able to resist this kind of manipulation. But a steady stream of social-science studies suggests otherwise, demonstrating again and again how easily social pressures can affect the things we say, believe, do, think, eat. Our anxiety over influence goes back to the same fear Thomas Aquinas had, the same doubt families of alcoholics or cult members have. In the face of powerful influences, how can you locate and hold onto that original, irrefutable spark of self, your free will, your character, even your soul? That’s the fear that the idea of influence lays bare: that you can’t. Or that it might never have existed in the first place.
Power&Politics  influence  persuasion 
7 weeks ago
Forget Trying to Craft a 'Genius' Daily Routine. Do Like Billionaire Sara Blakely and Worry More About Your Weekly Routine
""There are certain days that I have segmented. Wednesday is always meeting day. I have meetings with my direct reports and key people I'm involved with in the business all day Wednesday. Monday is my think day. I usually clear my entire calendar for Monday, unless something urgent comes up. I use that day to create and think. Thursdays, I spend a lot of time with the product and creative team. Tuesday and Friday, as things come up, each can be a little different," she reports."
from instapaper
7 weeks ago
how I drew my mental map of politics —Snakes and Ladders “Over at Rod Dreher’s joint, he’s got a great series going in which people explain how they have have formed their mental maps of the political world.”
The Reagan years were for me an education in political cynicism. In the 1980s I came to believe what I still believe: That almost no elected politicians have principles that they’re willing to stake their careers on, and those who have such principles typically last a single term in office; that the rare politician who has integrity almost certainly lacks courage, while those who have courage lack integrity; that the extremely rare politician who has both courage and integrity will surely lack judgment; that the members of both major parties care primarily about getting and keeping power, secondarily about exerting that power over the powerless, and beyond that about nothing else whatsoever; that both parties are parties of death, differing only on their preferred targets (though they are equally fond, it seems, of military action in Asia); that the only meaningful criterion by which to judge who to vote for is encapsulated in the question Who will do less damage to our social fabric?
7 weeks ago
A Saudi Prince’s Quest to Remake the Middle East
"In the seventy years since Saudi Arabia began exporting oil at scale, it has grown into the largest economy in the Middle East, with a welfare state whose benefits include free education and health care, along with subsidized food, electricity, and housing. But the economy relies overwhelmingly on oil; the country exports almost nothing else, and imports almost everything else, from food to freshwater. The welfare state was built on the expectation that the price of oil would remain at historic levels of at least a hundred dollars a barrel. It is now about sixty-two dollars, and is widely predicted to keep falling. “If you are the guy driving the Saudi bus, my advice would be to get off it as soon as you can,” Jan Stuart, an energy economist in New York, told me. The former defense official put it even more starkly: “In five to seven years, at current trends, they’re broke.”

The economic pressures on the Saudi state are likely to get worse. Close to seventy per cent of the population is under thirty years old. Every year, the government pays for as many as seventy thousand young people to study in the United States. Those students return home wanting jobs and, often, at least some of the freedoms that they enjoyed in the West."
from instapaper
8 weeks ago
A Saudi Prince’s Quest to Remake the Middle East
"M.B.S.’s appointments also allowed him to display his apparently irrepressible ambition. In April, 2016, when President Obama paid his final visit to Saudi Arabia, he and King Salman sat facing each other, with their aides grouped around them. Obama’s advisers noticed that, each time the President spoke, Salman, who was eighty, paused before answering, while M.B.S., several seats to his left, typed on an iPad. When M.B.S. finished, the King read from an iPad of his own and then responded to Obama. “The chances of that being a coincidence are quite low,” a former national-security official told me."
from instapaper
8 weeks ago
Productivity
"I find most meetings are best scheduled for 15-20 minutes, or 2 hours. The default of 1 hour is usually wrong, and leads to a lot of wasted time."
from instapaper
8 weeks ago
Productivity
"I am relentless about getting my most important projects done—I’ve found that if I really want something to happen and I push hard enough, it usually happens.

I try to be ruthless about saying no to stuff, and doing non-critical things in the quickest way possible. I probably take this too far—for example, I am almost sure I am terse to the point of rudeness when replying to emails."
from instapaper
8 weeks ago
Productivity
"make sure to leave enough time in my schedule to think about what to work on. The best ways for me to do this are reading books, hanging out with interesting people, and spending time in nature."
from instapaper
8 weeks ago
History will judge Colombia’s outgoing president kindly
"Why do more Colombians not recognise Mr Santos’s achievements? A stable but recently mediocre economy has made them grouchy. The president often over-promised, on everything from roads to peace. He lacks the popular touch. But he is right, at least in part, to blame the implacable and often disloyal opposition of Mr Uribe, who repeatedly accused him of handing Colombia over to communism."
from instapaper
8 weeks ago
History will judge Colombia’s outgoing president kindly
"But history, and Colombians, will remember Mr Santos for one thing: the agreement that, after almost five years of talks, put an end to more than 50 years of fighting by the FARC, a leftist guerrilla army, and which won him the Nobel peace prize. The accord has seen some 10,000 former fighters disarm and begin to enter civilian life. Provided their leaders confess to their crimes before a special tribunal, which began its work this month, they will face only symbolic punishment. On July 20th ten former FARC leaders took their seats in Colombia’s Congress.

These concessions are unacceptable to many Colombians, who think the FARC’s commanders belong in jail. Mr Santos narrowly lost a referendum on the peace agreement in 2016. The government then sat down with the leaders of the No campaign, including Mr Uribe, and acted on most of their suggestions to renegotiate many details of the accord. Nevertheless, Mr Duque promises to undo parts of it. Mr Santos is confident that it cannot be reversed. Others are less sure."
from instapaper
8 weeks ago
https://www.chronicle.com/article/The-Academy-Is-Largely/245080/
"Q. You get asked about your productivity a lot. I gather it’s a question you don’t like.

A. I sometimes say to people — this is like a 1930s thing to say, you can picture Barbara Stanwyck saying it in a noir film — it’s like complimenting a girl on her personality. It’s not about "You do good work," it’s about "You do a lot of work."

For a lot of people writing is an agony; it’s a part of what we do as scholars that they least enjoy. For me writing is a complete and total joy, and if I’m not writing I’m miserable. I have always written a lot. For years, before I wrote for The New Yorker, I wrote an op-ed every day as practice and shoved it in a drawer. It’s not about being published, it’s about the desire to constantly be writing. It’s such a strongly felt need that if it was something socially maladaptive it would be considered a vice."
from instapaper
8 weeks ago
https://www.chronicle.com/article/The-Academy-Is-Largely/245080/
"Q. How is the academy implicated in or imperiled by this moment of epistemological crisis?

A. The academy is largely itself responsible for its own peril. The retreat of humanists from public life has had enormous consequences for the prestige of humanistic ways of knowing and understanding the world.

Universities have also been complicit in letting sources of federal government funding set the intellectual agenda. The size and growth of majors follows the size of budgets, and unsurprisingly so. After World War II, the demands of the national security state greatly influenced the exciting fields of study. Federal-government funding is still crucial, but now there’s a lot of corporate money. Whole realms of knowing are being brought to the university through commerce.

I don’t expect the university to be a pure place, but there are questions that need to be asked. If we have a public culture that suffers for lack of ability to comprehend other human beings, we shouldn’t be surprised. The resources of institutions of higher learning have gone to teaching students how to engineer problems rather than speak to people."
from instapaper
8 weeks ago
Why Are Young People Having So Little Sex?
"In exchanges like these, I was struck by what a paralyzing and vicious cycle unhappiness and abstinence can be. The data show that having sex makes people happier (up to a point, at least; for those in relationships, more than once a week doesn’t seem to bring an additional happiness bump). Yet unhappiness inhibits desire, in the process denying people who are starved of joy one of its potential sources. Are rising rates of unhappiness contributing to the sex recession? Almost certainly. But mightn’t a decline in sex and intimacy also be leading to unhappiness?"
from instapaper
8 weeks ago
Why Are Young People Having So Little Sex?
"Maybe choice overload applies a little differently than Slater imagined. Maybe the problem is not the people who date and date some more—they might even get married, if Rosenfeld is right—but those who are so daunted that they don’t make it off the couch. This idea came up many times in my conversations with people who described sex and dating lives that had gone into a deep freeze. Some used the term paradox of choice; others referred to option paralysis (a term popularized by Black Mirror); still others invoked fobo (“fear of a better option”).

And yet online dating continues to attract users, in part because many people consider apps less stressful than the alternatives. Lisa Wade suspects that graduates of high-school or college hookup culture may welcome the fact that online dating takes some of the ambiguity out of pairing up (We’ve each opted in; I’m at least a little bit interested in you). The first time my husband and I met up outside work, neither of us was sure whether it was a date. When you find someone via an app, there’s less uncertainty."
from instapaper
8 weeks ago
Why Are Young People Having So Little Sex?
"Teenagers, for one. An intriguing study published last year in the Journal of Population Economics examined the introduction of broadband internet access at the county-by-county level, and found that its arrival explained 7 to 13 percent of the teen-birth-rate decline from 1999 to 2007."
from instapaper
8 weeks ago
Christian Wiman’s stubborn, slippery faith
"The ultimate subject of He Held Radical Light is faith. Wiman accepts the practical need for religion, for “communal ritual and meaningful creeds.” Yet he much prefers the amorphous nature of faith, so he fears the trouble of religion is that “to define is to defile. One either lives toward God or not.” We need faith because poetry (and art in general) “is not enough.” Wiman writes,

Those spots of time are not enough to hang a life on. At some point you need a universally redemptive activity. You need grace that has nothing to do with your own efforts, for at some point—whether because of disease or despair, exhaustion or loss—you will have no efforts left to make.

For a poet who once wanted to write an eternal poem, that is a nice humility. Wiman returned to faith after his cancer diagnosis, but he has also described the slippery nature of that faith. “It has been my experience,” Wiman testifies, “that faith, like art, is most available when I cease to seek it, cease even to believe in it, perhaps, if by belief one means that busy attentiveness, that purposeful modern consciousness that knows its object.” He Held Radical Light captures that dogged, hypnotic stubbornness of faith."
from instapaper
9 weeks ago
How “Silicon Valley” Nails Silicon Valley
"Before writing the episode, Judge and Berg spent a weekend at TechCrunch Disrupt, in San Francisco. “That’s the first thing you notice,” Judge said. “It’s capitalism shrouded in the fake hippie rhetoric of ‘We’re making the world a better place,’ because it’s uncool to just say ‘Hey, we’re crushing it and making money.’” After the scene aired, viewers complained about the lack of diversity in the audience. Berg recalled, “A friend of mine who works in tech called me and said, ‘Why aren’t there any women? That’s bullshit!’ I said to her, ‘It is bullshit! Unfortunately, we shot that audience footage at the actual TechCrunch Disrupt.’”"
from instapaper
10 weeks ago
Call them power skills, not soft skills | LinkedIn
"Here's the thing. Look at what is in the bucket of soft skills: team management, interpersonal communication, empathy, conflict resolution, critical thinking, perspective-taking. The so-called “soft skills” are neither easy nor are they out of place in an organisation. The origin of the dichotomy comes from a US Army assessment between 1960-1970. Hard skills were hard because they were well-defined and straightforward. Soft skills were soft because “we don't know much about the physical and social environments in which the skill occurs and...the consequences of different ways of accomplishing the job function”.

In fact, the hard skills are actually the easy ones to grasp. You can wrap your head around them. Advanced calculus, or understanding the chain rule, or fiddling with a Gantt chart is really teachable and manageable once you know how. What is truly tough is persuading a child to do something they don't want to do. Or resolving a conflict between two, three or more people. Or motivating a recalcitrant team to follow you, even when the data doesn't support it. Or deciding that even when the data suggests it, something shouldn't be done. That's hard."
from instapaper
10 weeks ago
The Case Against Running With Headphones
"Our sport seems mindless only to people who never run long enough for any thought to form other than “When can I stop running?” But the only way to succeed as a long-distance runner is to do it mindfully, to be aware of the body and the world it is moving through."
from instapaper
10 weeks ago
Burn the boat – Peter Bromka – Medium
"And yet, as a husband and a father, this pursuit cannot and should not be my entire focus. I’ve heard of people putting their running ahead of their marriage and their children, just that idea breaks my heart. Our task is to maximize our spirit and our speed while life allows."
from instapaper
10 weeks ago
Are You an Ethical Leader?
"What does happen?

Shotts: If you want to live according to a set of values, that’s a legitimate reason to push for regulation, to say, “You know, we’re going to be at a competitive disadvantage if other firms do bad, unethical practices, and we would like the government to step in.” And if you can’t get the government to do it, maybe approach activist groups and say, “You know, we’re happy to work with you to monitor our competition and shine the light on them if they’re doing stuff wrong.”"
from instapaper
10 weeks ago
Are You an Ethical Leader?
"In your class, you mention how regulations force companies to abide by societal values. In the U.S., we’re seeing deregulation in everything from the environment to finance. What does that mean for a values-based leader?

Shotts: Deregulation doesn’t occur in a vacuum. It doesn’t occur without the participation of companies. Governments set the rules, and companies influence the rules. First, it’s incumbent upon business leaders to think about whether it’s ethical for them to push for a certain set of rules, and second, whether they should hold themselves as a firm or an industry to some higher standard than what the law requires.

There can be reasons to hold one’s self to a higher standard. They might be the values of the employees within the company. A great example is the pharmaceutical industry, where a lot of people work in the industry because they care about health care. In the industry’s traditional business model, if you get a successful drug, you have to exploit that IP as much as you can. This created a big conflict around 2000 with the global AIDS epidemic, when the pharmaceutical companies charged a fortune for their drugs. They got all this negative flak for it, partially because people within the companies were dissatisfied. They’re like, “We’re trying to improve people’s health. What are we doing with this pricing?”"
from instapaper
10 weeks ago
Are You an Ethical Leader?
"Shotts: We need to use both the gut and analytical approaches to decisions, particularly for high-stakes stuff. And we need to do analysis well. I can come up with a spreadsheet and rig it so it aligns with my gut instincts. One of my best friends did this when he was trying to decide where to go to college. He kept jiggering the spreadsheet until it gave him the answer he wanted.

Malhotra: Very high-functioning people don’t often understand that they use their intellect to rationalize their gut. The story of Supreme Court decisions, for example, is basically extreme intellectual rationalization of gut reactions.

How do we counteract that?

Shotts: Take time. If we have to do something quickly, our gut is the only thing we can use. It’s only possible to use both our gut and reason if we take time. Also, rely on other people. This requires setting up an organizational structure where it’s OK for the person in charge to be disagreed with or criticized. Highly functioning organizations do that well, while dysfunctional organizations penalize people who disagree.

Malhotra: Powerful people typically don’t perceive that other people are agreeing with them because of their role. They have to learn to recognize that."
from instapaper
10 weeks ago
2018 New York Marathon is the race of a lifetime for Allie Kieffer
"In August, Kieffer acknowledged the skepticism head-on and read the LetsRun comments aloud in a series of Instagram videos. One by one, she ticked them off. Then she addressed the camera directly.

"Unfortunately, I'm the type of person who actually cares what people on these message boards write about them," she said. "The words that I'm too old and I'm too big and I'm doping? Those hurt." She was seething with anger now. She knew she couldn't stop the chatter at this point in the year. But in November, New York would come back around again.

New York would be her answer. She would speak through her body. From now on, she would control the message.

"I'm going to use your words as ammunition -- to prove you wrong," she said into the camera. "Because I'm not too old. And I'm not too big. And I'm not doping. I'm here to stay.""
from instapaper
10 weeks ago
What’s All This About Journaling?
"If you’re distressed about something, Dr. Pennebaker advises, set aside three to four days to write for 15 to 20 minutes a day about it. If you don’t find a benefit from it, he says, “stop doing it. Go jogging. See a therapist. Go to a bar. Go to church.”"
from instapaper
10 weeks ago
An Aging Marathoner Tries to Run Fast After 40
"Running faster always feels good, but running faster when you’re getting old feels good in a different way. When we’re young we wake up in the morning knowing that we’re probably stronger, taller, and faster than the day before. We want to be older because we want to be at our peak.

At some point, that desire fades, and then it flips. We wake up knowing we’re weaker and slower, and we have to work hard to stay in the same place as the day before. It’s all partly an illusion: We get a day older, whether we spend it running up a mountain or lying on a couch. Still, going faster means we’re doing something right.

I know, though, that it all has to end at some point. My joints will give out, my back will start to ache, or maybe reason will prevail. There are advantages to finding hobbies that don’t depend on exhaustion and obsession. Still, I don’t think I’m quite ready. One of the perversities of the sport is that, like gambling, it’s very hard to quit after you’ve done well."
from instapaper
10 weeks ago
Why Science Can’t Tell Us How to Live
"But in the end, any account of moral reasoning that omits a Christian understanding of right and wrong is destined to fail. For Christians, the fundamental problem with the quest for a scientific understanding of morality is the attempt to establish moral law while explicitly ruling out the possibility of a moral lawgiver. Unless those seeking a common morality through the humanities are open to the idea of grounding that morality in something higher than human beings themselves, they will founder on the same shoals that wrecked attempts to arrive at morality through science. Even the very best history, literature, and philosophy won’t build a reliable bridge between “is” and “ought.”"
from instapaper
11 weeks ago
Why Science Can’t Tell Us How to Live
"Science can tell us the way things are but not the way things ought to be. In the language of philosophy, it can’t derive an “ought” from an “is.”"
from instapaper
11 weeks ago
Opinion | The Ambition Explosion
"Capitalism on its own breeds people who are vaguely aware that they are not living the spiritually richest life, who are ill-equipped to know how they might do so, who don’t have the time to do so, and who, when they go off to find fulfillment, end up devoting themselves to scattershot causes and light religions.

To survive, capitalism needs to be embedded in a moral culture that sits in tension with it, and provides a scale of values based on moral and not monetary grounds. Capitalism, though, is voracious. The personal ambition it arouses is always threatening to blot out the counterculture it requires."
from instapaper
11 weeks ago
What I Learned About Life at My 30th College Reunion
"Every classmate who became a teacher or doctor seemed happy with the choice of career.
Many lawyers seemed either unhappy or itching for a change, with the exception of those who became law professors. (See No. 2 above.)
Nearly every single banker or fund manager wanted to find a way to use accrued wealth to give back (some had concrete plans, some didn’t), and many, at this point, seemed to want to leave Wall Street as soon as possible to take up some sort of art.
Speaking of art, those who went into it as a career were mostly happy and often successful, but they had all, in some way, struggled financially.
They say money can’t buy happiness, but in an online survey of our class just prior to the reunion, those of us with more of it self-reported a higher level of happiness than those with less."
from instapaper
11 weeks ago
Twitter
Brad designed my deck and absolutely crushed it. Thanks, !
from twitter_favs
12 weeks ago
The Importance of Meeting In-Person
a great visualization of the network at Automatic following meetups
network 
october 2018
WHO DISPLAYS ETHICAL LEADERSHIP, AND WHY DOES IT MATTER? AN EXAMINATION OF ANTECEDENTS AND CONSEQUENCES OF ETHICAL LEADERSHIP
In the present research, we examine antecedents
of ethical leadership by testing whether one source
of motivation for leaders to exhibit ethical behav-
iors arises from a self-defining knowledge structure
that several writers (e.g., Aquino & Reed, 2002;
Blasi, 1983, 2004; Damon & Hart, 1992; Lapsley &
Narvaez, 2004) refer to as moral identity . Our the-
oretical model posits that moral identity motivates
leaders to act in ways that demonstrate some re-
sponsiveness to the needs and interests of others,
an orientation that many philosophers (e.g., Kant,
1948) and psychologists (e.g., Eisenberg, 2000; Gil-
ligan, 1982) consider a defining characteristic of
moral behavior. We also explore consequences of
ethical leadership at the work-unit level by draw-
ing on social learning theory (Bandura, 1977, 1986).
We focus on unit-level outcomes because group
members exposed to similar cues in an environ-
ment regarding norms for appropriate behavior
tend to behave in a fairly homogeneous manner
(e.g., Salancik & Pfeffer, 1978). The specific out-
comes we examine include unethical behavior (i.e.,
behavior that is morally unacceptable to the larger
community [Jones, 1991]) and relationship conflict
(i.e., interpersonal strife associated with differ-
ences in personalities or matters unrelated to a job
[Jehn, 1995]).
ethics  Power&Politics 
october 2018
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