Opinion | The Quiet Death of Racial Progress
"That is to say, the left-wingers have it correct when they point to the systems of oppression that pervade society: the legacy of residential segregation; the racist attitudes in the workplace that demonstrably make it much harder for African-American men to get jobs; the prejudices — in the schools, in the streets and in the judicial system — that make it much more likely that African-American males will be punished, incarcerated and marginalized.

But conservatives are right to point to the importance of bourgeois norms. Three institutions do an impressive job of reducing racial disparity: the military, marriage and church. As the A.E.I. study shows, black men who served in the military are more likely to be in the middle class than those who did not. Black men who attended religious services are 76 percent more likely to attain at least middle-class status than those who did not. As Chetty’s research shows, the general presence of fathers — not just one’s own — in the community is a powerful determinant of whether young men will be able to rise and thrive."
from instapaper
7 days ago
Jack Ma: How to be successful in your 20s, 30s, 40s and beyond
When Alibaba founder and CEO Jack Ma was a young adult, he applied to over 30 jobs and got rejected by all of them. Today, the 53-year-old's e-commerce company is valued at $519 billion, although Ma didn't start achieving career success until his 30s.

"In life, it's not how much we achieved, it's how much we've gone through the tough days and mistakes," Ma recently said to a group of young leaders invited to the World Economic Forum annual meeting in Davos, Switzerland. "If you want to be successful, learn from the other people's mistakes, don't learn from the successful stories."

As an alum of the Young Global Leaders network, Ma shed light on what the room of young adults should focus on within the next 30 years.


"When you are 20 to 30 years old, you should follow a good boss [and] join a good company to learn how to do things properly," Ma said.

"When you are 30 to 40 years old, if you want to do something yourself, just do it. You still can afford to lose, to fail," he added.

Soon thereafter, though, Ma recommended that people start prioritizing stability, family and the future generations.

Instead of diving into a new field or subject toward the later years in your career, he said, "when you're 4
career 
12 days ago
the Ministry of Amnesia
"So why is that? Why, though certainly there is some anger at the global-capitalist system, is there, relative to reasonable expectations, so little? Why don’t people care that, since the massively reckless incompetencies of 2008, almost nothing has changed? (Lanchester documents the insignificant of the changes very thoroughly.)

The first answer is that almost nobody — almost nobody — remembers what happened in 2008. And why don’t they remember? Because of social media and smartphones.

I cannot, of course, provide documentary proof for that claim. But as the Marxists used to say I believe it is no accident that the shaking of the foundations of the global economy and “the longest period of declining real incomes in recorded economic history” happened just as the iPhone was taking serious hold on the imagination of the developed world, and Facebook and Twitter were becoming key components of everyday life in that world. On your smartphones you can get (a) a stream of prompts for visceral wrath and fear and then (b) games and distractions that accomplish the suddenly-necessary self-soothing. Between the wrath and fear and the subsequent soothing, who can remember what happened last week, much less ten years ago? Silicon Valley serves the global capitalist order as its Ministry of Amnesia. “What is it I was so concerned about?”"
from instapaper
13 days ago
Tech Vs. 300 million cows. Can India’s sprawling ag industry be tamed by a startup?
A good piece focusing on the start of opportunity in emerging markets, and the challenges of seeing investment potential
VC  venture  emergingmarkets 
13 days ago
On Passion and Its Discontents - Study Hacks - Cal Newport
"“While ‘find your passion’ is well-intended advice, it might not be good advice.

A new study by Stanford psychologists examines the hidden implications of the advice to ‘find your passion.’

Mantras like ‘find your passion’ carry hidden implications…they imply that once an interest resonates, pursuing it will be easy. But, the research found that when people encounter inevitable challenges, that mindset makes it more likely people will surrender their newfound interest.
And the idea that passions are found fully formed implies that the number of interests a person has is limited. That can cause people to narrow their focus and neglect other areas.”"
from instapaper
17 days ago
Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez on her Catholic faith and the urgency of a criminal justice reform
"Solutions are already beginning to take shape, which include unraveling the War on Drugs, reconsidering mandatory minimum sentencing and embracing a growing private prison abolition movement that urges us to reconsider the levels at which the United States pursues mass incarceration. No matter where these proposals take us, we should pursue such conversations with an openness to change and an aim to rehabilitate our brothers and sisters wherever possible and wherever necessary. By nature, a society that forgives and rehabilitates its people is a society that forgives and transforms itself. That takes a radical kind of love, a secret of which is given in the Lord’s Prayer: Forgive us our trespasses, as we forgive those who trespass against us."
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17 days ago
Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez on her Catholic faith and the urgency of a criminal justice reform
"The still imprisoned are not so lucky. By virtually every measure, the United States incarcerates more of its people than any other nation in the world. When we look at the fuller picture of who we imprison, for how long and why, it may not be a stretch to conclude that our criminal justice system could very well benefit from a rite of penance of its own. There is overwhelming evidence that mass incarceration evolved as an outgrowth of Jim Crow laws, which itself was a system rooted in the subjugation of former slaves. According to legal scholar Michelle Alexander, there are more African-Americans under correctional control today than were enslaved in 1850—that is, before the Civil War."
from instapaper
17 days ago
Ridehail Revolution: Groundbreaking ITS dissertation examines discrimination and travel patterns for Lyft, Uber, and taxis - UCLA Institute of Transportation Studies
By contrast, Lyft and Uber nearly eliminate the racial differences in service. On both services, a black rider had about a 4 percent higher likelihood of being cancelled than a white rider. But 99.7 percent of Lyft and Uber riders reached their destination even if one driver cancelled a trip. While unlawful discrimination from taxi drivers prevent many black riders from completing a trip, driver biases on Uber and Lyft result in delayed, but not denied, mobility. And policy changes for ridehail apps — such as tracking driver cancellation behavior, permitting riders to use pseudonyms, and changing at what point in the pickup process drivers learn a rider’s name or race — could help erase the racial gap almost entirely.

Lyft is essentially omnipresent across LA, and most riders use the service only occasionally. The Lyft travel data showed no evidence that any Los Angeles neighborhoods are excluded from service based on the characteristics of their residents. Indeed, during the study period Lyft reac
socialimpact  business  bookproject 
18 days ago
Opinion | Republican or Conservative, You Have to Choose
"As Scruton put it in his bracing primer, “Conservatism: An Invitation to the Great Tradition,” “The question of which comes first, liberty or order, was to divide liberals from conservatives for the next 200 years.”

The practical upshot is that conservatives have always placed tremendous emphasis on the sacred space where individuals are formed. This space is populated by institutions like the family, religion, the local community, the local culture, the arts, the schools, literature and the manners that govern everyday life."
from instapaper
24 days ago
How McKinsey Lost Its Way in South Africa
"McKinsey refused to work in South Africa until it embraced democracy in the mid-1990s, but records show that it consults for many authoritarian governments, including the world’s mightiest, China, to a degree unheard of for a foreign company. Late last year, two McKinsey partners spoke at a meeting of the state-controlled conglomerate China Merchants Group that focused on carrying out Communist Party directives. McKinsey is also advising the Saudi crown prince, Mohammed bin Salman, as he seeks to make its economy less reliant on oil.

While confidentiality is necessary in private business, it can become problematic when public money is involved, as in South Africa, or for that matter in the United States, where McKinsey has advised more than 40 federal agencies, including the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the Central Intelligence Agency, the Defense Department and the Food and Drug Administration."
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24 days ago
Envisioning a (Hobbit-like) Culture of Community Data Sharing | LinkedIn
"CDT's role would be to verify and audit the trustworthiness of community partners, including provision of expertly-crafted legal agreement templates, in order to facilitate smoother, more efficient point-to-point data sharing. Click the network image below to get more information and download a copy of the PDF."
from instapaper
25 days ago
Silicon Valley would be wise to follow China’s lead
"In California, the blogosphere has been full of chatter about the inequity of life. Some of this, especially for women, is true and for certain individuals their day of reckoning has been long overdue. But many of the soul-sapping discussions seem like unwarranted distractions. In recent months, there have been complaints about the political sensibilities of speakers invited to address a corporate audience; debates over the appropriate length of paternity leave or work-life balances; and grumbling about the need for a space for musical jam sessions. These seem like the concerns of a society that is becoming unhinged.

These topics are absent in China’s technology companies, where the pace of work is furious. Here, top managers show up for work at about 8am and frequently don’t leave until 10pm. Most of them will do this six days a week — and there are plenty of examples of people who do this for seven. Engineers have slightly different habits: they will appear about 10am and leave at midnight. Beyond the week-long breaks for Chinese new year and the October national holiday, most will just steal an additional handful of vacation days. Some technology companies also provide a rental subsidy to employees who choose to live close to corporate HQ."
from instapaper
25 days ago
Opinion | #MeToo Comes for the Archbishop - The New York Times
That was before I realized that if you wanted the truth about corruption in the Catholic Church, you had to listen to the extreme-seeming types, traditionalists and radicals, because they were the only ones sufficiently alienated from the institution to actually dig into its rot. (This lesson has application well beyond Catholicism.)
MeToo 
25 days ago
The Leader’s Calendar
"CEOs oversee a large number of organizational units and work streams and countless types of decisions. Our research finds that they should have an explicit personal agenda and that most do. A clear and effective agenda optimizes the CEO’s limited time; without one, demands from the loudest constituencies will take over, and the most important work won’t get done."
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26 days ago
We will never disapprove of current levels of animal cruelty - Marginal REVOLUTION
"The majority of vegans are female in gender: e.g., 74% in USA [27], 66% in Germany [39] and 63% in UK [29];

They tend to be liberal-leftist politically: in USA, we have a 52% of liberals versus a 14% of conservatives and a 34% of self-styled “neutral” [27];

They are generally more educated than carnists (e.g., Ipsos Mori [29] for UK and Mensik et al. for Germany [39]);

They are more likely to be found in urban than country areas, with prevalence in big cities (e.g., Ipsos Mori [29] for UK, Roy Morgan Research for Australia [49] and Mensik et al. for Germany [39]);

They display an inclination to secular/atheist views on religion matters (e.g., Humane Research Council [27], where it is shown that about half of the American community of vegans/vegetarians is not religious—a percentage that is considerably higher than that of the general population)."
from instapaper
26 days ago
The Leader’s Calendar
"Given that work could consume every hour of their lives, CEOs have to set limits so that they can preserve their health and their relationships with family and friends. Most of the CEOs in our study recognized that. They slept, on average, 6.9 hours a night, and many had regular exercise regimens, which consumed about 9% of their nonwork hours (or about 45 minutes a day). To sustain the intensity of the job, CEOs need to train—just as elite athletes do. That means allocating time for health, fitness, and rest.

We paid special attention to the 25% of time—or roughly six hours a day—when CEOs were awake and not working. Typically, they spent about half those hours with their families, and most had learned to become very disciplined about this. Most also found at least some hours (2.1 a day, on average) for downtime, which included everything from watching television and reading for pleasure, to hobbies like photography.

The CEO’s job is mentally and physically demanding. Activities that preserve elements of normal life keep CEOs grounded and better able to engage with colleagues and workers—as opposed to distant, detached, and disconnected. CEOs also have to make time for their own professional renewal and development (which our data showed was often the biggest casualty of a packed schedule). And they must be careful, as our colleague Tom DeLong puts it, not to become “like race car drivers and treat home like a pit stop.”"
from instapaper
26 days ago
The Not-To-Do List: 9 Habits to Stop Now
"3. Do not agree to meetings or calls with no clear agenda or end time
If the desired outcome is defined clearly with a stated objective and agenda listing topics/questions to cover, no meeting or call should last more than 30 minutes. Request them in advance so you “can best prepare and make good use of the time together.”"
from instapaper
27 days ago
Why Living in a Poor Neighborhood Can Change Your Biology - Issue 61: Coordinates - Nautilus
"Consistent exposure to cortisol may re-wire the brain, for example, shrinking the pre-frontal cortex and bulking up the amygdala, the walnut-sized nodes in the brain that regulate emotions like fear and pleasure. Over time cortisol can increase the risk for depression and mental illness.

And cortisol’s physiological effects could explain the powerful links between stress and metabolic illnesses like Type 2 diabetes, obesity, and heart disease. In mice, stress amps up cravings for energy-dense foods; in people, comfort- or stress-eating is a familiar phenomenon.

Persistently elevated cortisol levels have been closely tied to weight gain, increased abdominal fat, and other aspects of metabolic syndrome, a collection of things that includes obesity and pre-diabetes. “Even if you’re not stress-eating, there’s a direct link between cortisol and Type 2 diabetes risk, and cortisol and obesity,” Hasson says."
from instapaper
4 weeks ago
Apple's Airpods Are an Omen
"There are some consequences to this scenario, if it plays out. For one, earbuds will cease to perform any social signaling whatsoever. Today, having one’s earbuds in while talking suggests that you are on a phone call, for example. Having them in while silent is a sign of inner focus—a request for privacy. That’s why bothering someone with earbuds in is such a social faux-pas: They act as a do-not-disturb sign for the body. But if AirPods or similar devices become widespread, those cues will vanish. Everyone will exist in an ambiguous state between public engagement with a room or space and private retreat into devices or media."
from instapaper
4 weeks ago
David Simon | Tony
"He was always that funny – either dry in his rhetorical savagery, or over-the-top hyperbolic in his foaming rage at vegetarians or micro-beer experts or elitist social or political orders. Everything built to a moment of careful, thoughtful wit. He often spoke as well as he wrote, and given the stylistic command of his prose work, this is saying something. I know a lot of writers. Only a few of us speak as we write. Shit, on a bad day, we can’t even write as we are supposed to write. Tony was never arch or florid; his comic exaggerations and rhetorical provocations were always somehow perfectly measured. He said what he meant and he meant what he said and he landed all of it. As a conversationalist, he simply delivered, moment to moment."
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5 weeks ago
Opinion | The Strange Failure of the Educated Elite
"The essential point is this: Those dimwitted, stuck up blue bloods in the old establishment had something we meritocrats lack — a civic consciousness, a sense that we live life embedded in community and nation, that we owe a debt to community and nation and that the essence of the admirable life is community before self.

The meritocracy is here to stay, thank goodness, but we probably need a new ethos to reconfigure it — to redefine how people are seen, how applicants are selected, how social roles are understood and how we narrate a common national purpose."
from instapaper
5 weeks ago
Yuval Harari Works Less Than You - Study Hacks - Cal Newport
"In his recent book, Rest: Why You Get More Done When You Work Less, Alex Soojung-Kim Pang argues from historical examples and scientific findings that a four hour “creative work day” is about optimal for producing important new things.

Beyond that, a busy workday consists primarily of busywork.

In other words, Yuval Harari can sacrifice a non-trivial fraction of his working hours without blunting his impact because the hours he’s sacrificing are not the relatively small number dedicated to cultivating his next big idea."
from instapaper
5 weeks ago
Twitter
This we want to think about more. What is other than a 'firm' as the core unit of analysis? Rebecca Henderson an…
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5 weeks ago
Twitter
Construction has begun in DeWitt! , Tish Boerigter, Shonn Colbrunn, Sibilla Boerigter and George Bo…
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6 weeks ago
Ira Glass's Commencement Speech at the Columbia Journalism School Graduation - This American Life
"Don’t wait. Make the stuff you want to make now. No excuses. Don’t wait for the perfect job or whatever. Don’t wait. Don’t wait. Don’t wait. One of the advantages of being a journalist is you don’t need permission. You can go and run down the story now and then find a home for it. Pay someone you respect - pay a friend - a little money to be your editor and the person you talk to about your next steps. Don’t wait. You have everything you need. Don’t wait."
from instapaper
6 weeks ago
Instagram will soon show users how much time they spend in the app
"Instagram is getting a new “Usage Insights” tool that helps users see how much time they’ve spent in the social media app, according to a discovery from app researcher Jane Manchun Wong who found the feature hidden in the code of Instagram’s Android app (via TechCrunch)."
from instapaper
6 weeks ago
Under the Banner of New York
"Yes, we “carry on,” after disaster and attack, but that’s not all we do. We also function pretty well day-to-day, with our multiple gods and none, with our graven images, and our Babel of languages. We may not know our neighbors’ names but we know the name of every dog in the dog-run, and that’s OK, too. Despite rarely cooking and often drinking, despite never mowing lawns (but usually recycling), our souls are not uniformly headed to eternal damnation. We can often be found screaming at strangers in the street but we just as frequently pick them up off the floor. And then there’s also the food, art, music, theater, film, literature. But they know all that."
from instapaper
6 weeks ago
Under the Banner of New York
"It’s amazing what a narrative can make someone do. We cannot give up on offering alternative stories. Here’s one about the people of New York: we are not scum. We are every variety of human. Some of us voted for a government that caused the destruction of cities far away. Some of us didn’t. Some of us are dopers and junkies. Some of us are preschool teachers and nuns. None of us deserve to be killed in the street. We are a multiplicity of humans in an elastic social arrangement that can be stretched in many directions. It’s not broken yet. I have no idea if it will break soon—but it’s not broken yet. And here comes the rain, clearing the streets, for an hour maybe, even for a whole afternoon. We’ll be back out tomorrow."
from instapaper
6 weeks ago
Donald Glover Can’t Save You
"Glover explained his periodic career changes by saying, “Authenticity is the journey of figuring out who you are through what you make.” When he started doing standup, in college, his sets were about being a black guy with nerdy white-guy interests. He maintained his smiling persona over the years, but his material grew increasingly caustic. One bit was about how terrible children are, how they’re “tiny little Hitlers.” “Seriously, that’s why I wear condoms,” he said. “I’d much rather have AIDS than a baby.” I asked Glover how he feels about that bit now, as a father. “I was wrong,” he instantly replied. “Having AIDS is actually way cheaper than having a baby.”"
from instapaper
6 weeks ago
Donald Glover Can’t Save You
"The biggest innovation was that the narrative never advanced: Earn and Alfred made no headway. The lone moment of arrival felt like a setback. As the season progressed, we realized that Earn secretly wanted one thing very badly: a place to stay. In the final minute of the last episode, we see him for the first time in his only actual home—a cot in a storage unit. “When I saw all the episodes together, I hated the show,” Lakeith Stanfield, who plays Darius, said. “The pacing was strange, there was a lot of space between things, and I didn’t understand Darius. But as I watched it more it began to reveal itself to me.” David Simon said, “I felt like Donald Glover was doing an entire show of the moments we treasured on ‘The Wire’ ”—the asides between drug sellers on the corner, the pop-culture riffs—“where we were stealing one back from television. Watching it felt luxurious.”"
from instapaper
6 weeks ago
Donald Glover Can’t Save You
"“That moment is like the hook in music,” Glover said. “It’s what tells you why you’re there.” “Atlanta” is oddly akin to “Black Mirror”: both shows suggest that life is out of control. On “Atlanta,” it’s not technology that’s the catalytic element, the intensifier of our predilection for self-delusion and misery—it’s racism and poverty. The alien power isn’t a watching eye but the absence of a watching eye. Glover and his staff write toward hypnotic images that encapsulate the resulting chaos: a black schoolchild in whiteface, cops swarming an Uber driver and shooting him dead, an invisible car that blasts through a clump of bystanders outside a club. Nick Grad, FX’s president of original programming, said, “When the special effect of the invisible car came in, we watched it, like, twenty times in a row.”"
from instapaper
6 weeks ago
The Math of Causation Puzzle | Quanta Magazine
"Although we tend to credit or blame things on a single major cause, in nature and in science there are almost always multiple factors that have to be exactly right for an event to take place. For example, we might attribute a forest fire to the carelessly thrown cigarette butt, but what about the grassy tract leading to the forest, the dryness of the vegetation, the direction of the wind and so on? All of these factors had to be exactly right for the fire to start. Even though many tossed cigarette butts don’t start fires, we zero in on human actions as causes, ignoring other possibilities, such as sparks from branches rubbing together or lightning strikes, or acts of omission, such as failing to trim the grassy path short of the forest. And we tend to focus on things that can be manipulated: We overlook the direction of the wind because it is not something we can control. Our scientifically incomplete intuitive model of causality is nevertheless very useful in practice, and helps us execute remedial actions when causes are clearly defined. In fact, artificial intelligence pioneer Judea Pearl has published a new book about why it is necessary to teach cause and effect to intelligent machines."
from instapaper
6 weeks ago
Twitter
My god man this is great. Thank you. and I are spending some time in the Bonica dat…
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6 weeks ago
Donald Glover Can’t Save You
"As the crew reset, Glover said, “You know what I always wanted to do for an episode?” Just then, that week’s director, Amy Seimetz, called, “O.K., action!” The actors ran the scene again. On “Cut!,” Glover continued his thought: “Yeah, so it’s the exact same thing, only with a bunch of white people who kind of look like us. And in the middle of the episode you realize it’s called ‘Boston.’ ”"
from instapaper
6 weeks ago
Here’s Your Cheat Sheet to Happiness
"Oettingen developed a tactic called WOOP to overcome hurdles.
First you identify your wish (losing weight) and imagine the outcome (having lost weight). Then you think about a likely obstacle (I love pizza) and make a concrete plan to get around it (avoid all pizzerias). WOOP!"
from instapaper
6 weeks ago
Here’s Your Cheat Sheet to Happiness
"For the next week, write down at least five things for which you’re grateful every day. These can be big things (your kids) or small things (the Twizzlers you bought at the corner deli didn’t taste like they’d been there for eight months). One study found that, in severely depressed patients, taking the time to record just three things daily over 15 days led to a reported increase in well-beingin 94 percent of respondents."
from instapaper
6 weeks ago
Here’s Your Cheat Sheet to Happiness
"Researchers have conclusively linked increased happiness with a meditation practice of even as little as ten minutes per day."
from instapaper
6 weeks ago
I Was Told There Would Be More
"Like Sasse, who ends his book with an imagined commencement speech from Theodore Roosevelt, James can sound endearingly old-fashioned. Take, for instance, his anger in The Varieties of Religious Experience over the American fear of poverty:

When we of the so-called better classes are scared as men were never scared in history at material ugliness and hardship; when we put off marriage until our house can be artistic, and quake at the thought of having a child without a bank-account and doomed to manual labor, it is time for thinking men to protest against so unmanly and irreligious a state of opinion."
from instapaper
6 weeks ago
Here’s Your Cheat Sheet to Happiness
"“One thing people get wrong about happiness is they focus on the extraordinary instead of the ordinary. We think that happiness comes from big or transformative experiences, but we neglect how we can spend moments in happier ways on a daily basis. All my research says that the best way people can be happier is to spend $40 on a time-saving service. Instead of fighting with your spouse over who should do the laundry, hire a laundry service. Forgo that time fighting to make a meal together or go for a walk with the person you love.” —Ashley Whillans, Harvard Business School"
from instapaper
6 weeks ago
I Was Told There Would Be More
"But though James often celebrates a certain kind of willfulness—choosing to believe, choosing to live, choosing to do the hard thing—he disdained, at the same time, what he called "the exclusive worship of the bitch-goddess SUCCESS." His desire was for people to stop being so afraid of losing status that they were unwilling to live. His disdain is aimed entirely at the wealthy, who are too frightened of losing what they have to take a risk, build a life, or have a family. And if he were writing now, he might take on a different kind of fear—not of poverty, but of this future without work. What is your adulthood, he might ask, if it can't exist without this prop? Don't you know that there are many people who have never been able to beself-reliant, to work? Can't you live if this is taken away?"
from instapaper
6 weeks ago
Want a Divorce in China? You Might Have to Fail a Quiz First.
"The divorce rate in China is rapidly rising, driven largely by working women who feel newly empowered to seek one. But the government is trying to slow the trend, which it sees as a source of social instability.

The quizzes — 15 questions, scored on a scale of 100 points — were developed as a way to prevent “impulse divorces,” Liu Chunling, an official in Lianyungang, a city in Jiangsu Province, told the Yangtse Late News. He said the authorities considered a score of 60 points or higher to mean “room for recovery,” and those couples were encouraged to work on their marriages."
from instapaper
6 weeks ago
Want a Divorce in China? You Might Have to Fail a Quiz First.
"A court in Nibin, a small city in Sichuan Province, refused to grant the couple a divorce in September after citing their stellar test scores, according to local news outlets."
from instapaper
6 weeks ago
The Risk of Discovery
"But maybe there is a simpler explanation. Maybe the smartness and the craziness were not as separate as we think. Physics seems to us a promising thing to work on, and alchemy and theology obvious wastes of time. But that's because we know how things turned out. In Newton's day the three problems seemed roughly equally promising. No one knew yet what the payoff would be for inventing what we now call physics; if they had, more people would have been working on it. And alchemy and theology were still then in the category Marc Andreessen would describe as "huge, if true.""
from instapaper
6 weeks ago
Conversational Disciplines
"Being able to broadly agree on how to evaluate contributions is what allows disciplines to tolerate (and enjoy) substantial, persistent disagreement about this or that “big question” or “core problem”. Thus, you are unlikely to convince your fellow Psychologists of something important (something that’s important to them, I mean) without some fake data good experimental evidence. Similarly, Economists may not pay attention to you if you do not proceed according to some (to them) widely-shared rules of ritualized mathematics model-building supplemented by some nonsense about incentives empirical evidence. Professional Historians will be less likely to take you seriously if your claims are not built on an elegant prose style a demonstrated mastery of a relevant archive. Sociologists may remain unconvinced of your claims if you do not blame neoliberalism blame neoliberalism."
from instapaper
6 weeks ago
Atheists Are Sometimes More Religious Than Christians
"The Pew survey shows that 27 percent of Americans call themselves “spiritual but not religious.” Even though they’ve left organized religion behind, many still pray regularly and believe in God. This raises an issue for researchers, because it suggests their traditional measures of religiosity can no longer be trusted to accurately identify religious people. “I think people are doing things that don’t mirror Christianity sufficiently enough for our categories to continue to be as explanatory as they once were,” said Blankholm. “These categories are at their limit—they’re in some ways outmoded.”"
from instapaper
6 weeks ago
China’s fast climb up the value chain
"Between 10 and 45 percent of revenue in China’s industries could shift from old business models to new ones enabled by digital by 2030. The transformation is picking up steam: in 2013, industries in the United States were 4.9 times more digitized than ones in China; in 2016, that figure had fallen to 3.7 times."
from instapaper
6 weeks ago
China’s fast climb up the value chain
"Everything speeds up in the digital economy, and nowhere is that more evident than in China. In little more than a decade, China has come from almost nowhere to become the largest e-commerce market in the world, accounting for more than 40 percent of global e-commerce transactions (exhibit). China’s mobile payments are 11 times the value of those in the United States thanks to consumers’ early embrace of the technology. This flourishing digital culture is paying innovation dividends, as China is home to one in three of the world’s start-up “unicorns,” those with more than $1 billion in market cap. And China now places in the top ranks of global venture-capital investment in virtual reality, autonomous vehicles, 3-D printing, robotics, drones, and artificial intelligence."
from instapaper
6 weeks ago
Opinion | The Baptist Apocalypse
"So the question posed by this age of revelation is simple: Now that you know something new and troubling and even terrible about your leaders or your institutions, what will you do with this knowledge?

For Baptists as for all of us, the direction of history after Trump will be determined not just by Providence’s challenge, but by our freely chosen answer."
from instapaper
7 weeks ago
Twitter
, I’m on the hunt for a database (or even sources) for historical polls of congressional elections,…
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7 weeks ago
Still Wilderness
"“Joy is the present tense, with the whole emphasis on the present,” writes
Kierkegaard. This is accurate insofar as it accords with the feeling of joy, which can banish all the retrospective and anticipatory mental noise we move through most of the time. But to define joy as present tense is to keep it fastened to time, and that doesn’t feel completely right. It might be truer to say that joy is a flash of eternity that illuminates time, but the word eternity does sit a bit lumpishly there on the page."
from instapaper
7 weeks ago
Still Wilderness
"Thus “One of the many days” names and consecrates all of the days, even as it gives form and pledges fidelity to a single one. And just as the frogs are probably not really “considering” the concept of Ben Dorain, so the poet, perhaps, and all of us along for the ride with him, stand in relation to some larger reality that this poem at once implies and denies: yes, there is that word miracles, but it is obvious that they have no existence apart from the actual. These metaphysical resonances are not added to the poem but implicit within it. God is a ghost only to those who haunt their own lives, the poem might be saying. Or: God is a given for those who fully inhabit their own lives (a “joy in which faith / is self-evident,” as the Polish writer Adam Zagajewski says). The word God is both inevitable and extraneous to this poem, as is the word joy."
from instapaper
7 weeks ago
Mary Meeker’s 2018 internet trends report: All the slides, plus analysis - Recode
China is catching up as a hub to the world’s biggest internet companies. Currently, China is home to nine of the world’s 20 biggest internet companies by market cap while the U.S. has 11. Five years ago, China had two and the U.S. had nine.
china  VC 
7 weeks ago
Here’s Your Cheat Sheet to Happiness
"By that reasoning, an hour should be much more valuable than a dollar — yet we consistently behave as if the opposite were true. For example: Would you accept a new job with a 20 percent higher salary if it meant a 25 percent longer workweek or a 50 percent longer commute? If so, you are valuing your monetary affluence over your time affluence. You are what Whillans and Dunn would call a “Morgan” — in their studies, they use the figures of “Taylor” (who values time) and “Morgan” (who values money) and ask respondents to identify with one or the other. Interestingly, people are reliably split evenly on whom they identify with. Yet the Taylors of the world report a much higher level of overall happiness in other areas of life."
from instapaper
7 weeks ago
Here’s Your Cheat Sheet to Happiness
"So what are the true sources of personal happiness? The best way psychologists have found to determine what makes people happy is to reverse-engineer happiness by studying the habits of people who already identify as happy. This is an inexact method, for reasons of correlation versus causation: You may be both happy and tall, but that doesn’t mean being tall is what makes you happy. But there are certain habits that have been shown to be consistent among happy people. Happy people devote time to family and friends. They practice gratitude. They practice optimism. They are physically active. They “savor life’s pleasures and try to live in the present moment,” as Lyubomirsky puts it."
from instapaper
7 weeks ago
Here’s Your Cheat Sheet to Happiness
"As part of the recent anthology This Idea Must Die: Scientific Theories That Are Blocking Progress, Santos and Tamar Gendler, a philosophy professor at Yale, submitted an essay titled “Knowing Is Half the Battle.” It discusses a phenomenon they’ve dubbed “the G.I. Joe Fallacy,” after the old G.I. Joe cartoon, which used the phrase “Knowing is half the battle” as a kind of tagline. This is a fallacy, they explain, because knowing, it turns out, is not half the battle. It’s not even close. “Recent work in cognitive science has demonstrated that knowing is a shockingly tiny fraction of the battle for most real-world decisions,” they explain. “You may know that $19.99 is pretty much the same as $20.00, but the first still feels like a significantly better deal.”"
from instapaper
7 weeks ago
Here’s Your Cheat Sheet to Happiness
"In her very first lecture, Santos emphasizes to her class that she wants to teach them not just the science of happiness but the practice of happiness. And happiness, it turns out, does take practice. But first you have to learn what exactly happiness is. If previous courses in this field might have been characterized as “Why Happy People Are Happy,” this course could be called “What Is Happiness, Why Aren’t You Happy, and What Can You Do to Change That?”"
from instapaper
7 weeks ago
A Call to Minimize Distraction & Respect Users' Attention by Tristan Harris
Tristan Harris' call for us to be more thougthful at Google around the attention economy... a document that he said did not get enough support
Power&Politics 
7 weeks ago
Tina Fey: Confessions of a Juggler
"I know older men in comedy who can barely feed and clean themselves, and they still work. The women, though, they’re all “crazy.” I have a suspicion—and hear me out, because this is a rough one—that the definition of “crazy” in show business is a woman who keeps talking even after no one wants to fuck her anymore.

The only person I can think of who has escaped the “crazy” moniker is Betty White, which, obviously, is because people still want to have sex with her.

This is the infuriating thing that dawns on you one day: even if you would never sleep with or even flirt with anyone to get ahead, you are being sexually adjudicated. Network executives really do say things like “I don’t know. I don’t want to fuck anybody on this show.”"
from instapaper
7 weeks ago
How Couples Should Divvy Up Financial Decision Making
"This is consistent with the economic concept of comparative advantage, as even if one spouse has an absolute advantage in terms of financial knowledge (i.e., he or she is the most financially knowledgeable spouse), that does not mean he or she will be the individual who can complete those tasks with the most comparative efficiency. In support of this view, the researchers found that relative demands on one’s time outside of the household and relative contributions to nonfinancial tasks were important predictors of financial responsibility (along with age, gender, relative preference for making financial decisions, and confidence in one’s ability to find financial information)."
from instapaper
7 weeks ago
The Singular Magic of Maira Kalman
"Much as her work for adults isn’t simply whimsy, Kalman’s books for children are not merely slapstick. “I respect my audience. I really do. I have as much respect for children as I do for adults and probably more,” she said.

In Thomas Jefferson: Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Everything, a children’s biography of the statesman, Kalman writes candidly about the man. “It is strongly believed that after his wife died, Jefferson had children with the beautiful Sally Hemings. Some of them were freed and able to pass for white. Passing for white meant that your skin was so light, you could hide the fact that you were partially black. To hide your background is a very sad thing. Perhaps people felt they had no choice in such a prejudiced land.”

“I think that you really can talk to kids about anything,” Kalman says. In Fireboat, she tells of an old ship that played a part in the 9/11 recovery efforts. She does not shy away from illustrating one of Minoru Yamasaki’s towers exploding. This may put off certain readers. But the book succeeds because Kalman is so forthright, the rare adult willing to admit to kids that scary things happen. By giving kids the facts, teasing out of that dreadful day a story of heroism, and telling it in her signature, almost musical style, the book is somehow reassuring rather than frightening."
from instapaper
7 weeks ago
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