Professors Must Now Fear Intimidation From Both Sides
"The bipartisan nature of intimidation is likely to have a chilling effect on speech, and on the quality of teaching. Professors must think twice before trying any provocative teaching exercise or line of questioning. But given the nature of social media and mob mentalities, being careful is not enough. Anything you say can be distorted and misreported, potentially destroying your reputation and your career. So why take chances, why say anything controversial at all? Socrates would not last a month at a modern American university.

Given the dynamics of the larger American culture war, I believe that things are likely to get worse on campus. In future posts and essays, I and other members of Heterodox Academy will write about what can be done to break this cycle of escalation and restore a culture of free and fearless inquiry on campus. For now, I just want to note that many of us at Heterodox Academy are deeply disturbed that so many professors are getting mobbed and threatened and fired in the 6-step process I laid out above."
from instapaper
5 days ago
This Morning Routine will Save You 20+ Hours Per Week
"For best results: Spend 20% of your energy on your work and 80% of your energy on recovery and self-improvement. When you’re getting high quality recovery, you’re growing. When you’re continually honing your mental model, the quality and impact of your work continually increases. This is what psychologists call, “Deliberate Practice.” It’s not about doing more, but better training. It’s about being strategic and results-focused, not busyness-focused.

In one study, only 16 percent of respondents reported getting creative insight while at work. Ideas generally came while the person was at home, in transportation, or during recreational activity. “The most creative ideas aren’t going to come while sitting in front of your monitor,” says Scott Birnbaum, a vice president of Samsung Semiconductor."
from instapaper
5 days ago
Steve Jobs’ legacy & The iPhone X
"And that brings me back to Apple and FaceID. The reason FaceID works as smoothly as it did in my hands on is because the camera and its wizardry are married to the ability of the A11 chip to use neural networking technology to utilize the facial recognition algorithms and then seamlessly hide them inside the operating system and the device design. One doesn’t need to know any of that— as long as it feels like magic."
from instapaper
6 days ago
How to Win the Fight Against Information Overload
"How you deal with information overload is subjective. The following approaches, however, offer promising results:

Unify communication on a single platform.
Aggregate content as much as possible.
Use automation to deal with new information, especially with regards to content discovery.
Use the Getting Things Done approach to segregate and deal with information.
Create distraction-free “quiet time” to do deep work.
What are some of your own favorite strategies for dealing with information overload? Share them with us in the comments below!"
from instapaper
6 days ago
How to Win the Fight Against Information Overload
"In the James G. Miller paper I shared earlier, Miller notes that there are seven essential strategies for dealing with information overload:

Omission, i.e. instead of consuming all information, intentionally skipping some of it.
Error, i.e. responding quickly without fully taking in all available information.
Queuing, i.e. consuming information later when you have more time.
Filtering, i.e. using a framework or automated processes to filter out unessential information.
Employing multiple channels/delegation, i.e. distributing responsibility for dealing with specific types of information to different people.
Approximation, i.e. skimming through information and arriving at an approximated conclusion.
Escaping, i.e. handing over responsibility to someone else; giving up."
from instapaper
6 days ago
Crash course in the nature of mind
"Down the hall, in a section of Griffiths' lab outfitted with comfy couches and embroidered pillows, scores of people have spent some of the most profound hours of their lives. Participants swallow a capsule of psilocybin and plunge into hours of singular intensity, accompanied by specially trained guides who monitor them and help them feel safe and nurtured, Griffiths says. The volunteers report visions of lofty cathedrals and dense jungles and loved ones long dead. They have relived moments from their past, as if unscrewing a series of jars containing forgotten days. The experience ripples through them in the months and years to come. They report feeling more open and creative, more caring toward others, and aware of the interconnectedness of all life.

These are also the gifts of meditation, says Griffiths, who continues to meditate for as long as two hours each day. Meditation enables you to shift your identity, he says, to reshape your sense of self. For him, that has meant letting go of focusing on material accomplishments and professional recognition. A former confirmation class dropout, he has developed a sense of spirituality. After decades spent examining the effects of various substances such as caffeine on the brain, now he wants to delve into the questions of consciousness that most interest him."
from instapaper
8 days ago
Yes, I’m Dependent on Weed
"My mind, moreover, shifted into a much more nonlinear and creative mood when I was high. I never write when stoned. But I do let my mind wander, revisit my writing in my head, see better its flaws, drill down past my defenses, and allow myself to explore alternative ideas. One more thing: My experience of music changed. For the first time, I was able to turn off the ordeal of consciousness and allow myself to listen properly. It hasn’t really enhanced my appreciation of food (eating still basically bores me) but it has sharpened and deepened my visual capacities. It can make Cape light even more transcendent and transforming.

But my memory? Much worse. My lungs? They’ve taken a hit, even if vaping has helped. Weed may shorten my life by hurting my lungs — but endless insomnia might have shortened it more. Could I go cold turkey? I have from time to time, but it’s not easy, largely because the insomnia always returns. In that sense, I’m busted. By some criteria, I am dependent. Others may find that dependence an impediment to their lives and work, and legalizers don’t need to deny that. We’re all different, and weed most definitely isn’t for everyone. But compared with all the other substances available, and most other avenues to chill and friendship, it remains, it seems to me, a no-brainer to legalize it, and for many sane adults, one of God’s great gifts to humankind"
from instapaper
8 days ago
Feeling Older? Here’s How to Embrace It
"Dr. Devi said a patient who died at 101 had told her to try to have a friend “from every decade of life.” He had befriended an array of people, including Dr. Devi’s daughter, who was 12 at the time."
from instapaper
8 days ago
Feeling Older? Here’s How to Embrace It
"Find something to commit to improving, whether it’s tennis or cabinetry. Mr. Ludwig suggested focusing on helping others, especially younger people.

Remember, too, that you are not the only one feeling sore or slowing down, he said.

“There are millions of Americans waking up with those aches and pains,” Mr. Ludwig said. “What is the alternative to aging? It’s dying young.”"
from instapaper
8 days ago
Angelina Jolie, Unbroken
"She intimated that “First They Killed My Father” might have informed her decision to leave Mr. Pitt. The film centers on Ms. Ung’s family members, some of whom survived, and Ms. Jolie said she thought a lot about what family meant during production, and how they should help each other and take care of one another (the film is adapted from Ms. Ung’s 2000 book of the same name).

“Loung had such horrors in her life but also had so much love, and that is why she’s all right today,” Ms. Jolie said. “That is something I need to remember.”"
marriage  Movies  from instapaper
11 days ago
Maker's Schedule, Manager's Schedule
"I find one meeting can sometimes affect a whole day. A meeting commonly blows at least half a day, by breaking up a morning or afternoon. But in addition there's sometimes a cascading effect. If I know the afternoon is going to be broken up, I'm slightly less likely to start something ambitious in the morning. I know this may sound oversensitive, but if you're a maker, think of your own case. Don't your spirits rise at the thought of having an entire day free to work, with no appointments at all? Well, that means your spirits are correspondingly depressed when you don't. And ambitious projects are by definition close to the limits of your capacity. A small decrease in morale is enough to kill them off."
productivity  from instapaper
11 days ago
America’s Epidemic of Unnecessary Care
"Other people of a more consumerist bent will be troubled not that I gave her the choice but that she paid virtually none of the expenses incurred by it. The nature of her insurance coverage guaranteed that. Her employer had offered her two options. One was a plan with a high deductible and a medical savings account that would have made her pay a substantial portion of the many-thousand-dollar operation. And this might have made her think harder about proceeding (or, at least, encouraged her to find someone cheaper). But, like many people, she didn’t want to be in that situation. So she chose the second option, which provided full coverage for cases like this one. She found it difficult enough to weigh her fears of the cancer against her fears of the operation—with its risks of life-threatening bleeding and voice damage—without having to put finances into the equation."
from instapaper
12 days ago
America’s Epidemic of Unnecessary Care
"McAllen, in large part because of changes led by primary-care doctors, has gone from a cautionary tale to something more hopeful. Nationwide, the picture is changing almost as fast. Just five years after the passage of health-care reform, twenty per cent of Medicare payments are being made to physicians who have enrolled in alternative-payment programs, whether through accountable-care organizations like those in McAllen or by accepting Walmart-like packaged-price care—known as bundled payment—for spine surgery, joint surgery, and other high-cost procedures. If government targets are met, these numbers will reach thirty per cent of Medicare payments by 2016. A growing number of businesses are also extending the centers-of-excellence approach to their employees, including Boeing, Kohl’s, Lowe’s, and PepsiCo. And a nonprofit in California, the Pacific Business Group on Health, now offers to provide a similar network to any health-care purchaser in the country.

Could a backlash arrive and halt the trend? It’s a concern. No one has yet invented a payment system that cannot be gamed. If doctors are rewarded for practicing more conservative medicine, some could end up stinting on care. What if Virginia Mason turns away a back-pain patient who should have gone to surgery? What if Dr. Osio fails to send a heart patient to the emergency room when he should have? What if I recommend not operating on a tiny tumor, saying that it is just a turtle, and it turns out to be a rabbit that bounds out of control?"
from instapaper
12 days ago
America’s Epidemic of Unnecessary Care
"I spoke to Carlos Hernandez, an internist and the president of WellMed. He explained that the medical group was founded twenty-five years ago, in San Antonio, by a geriatrician who believed that what the oldest and sickest most needed in our hyper-specialized medical system was slower, more dedicated primary care. “Our philosophy is that the primary-care physician and patient should become the hub of the entire health-care-delivery system,” Hernandez said. He viewed the primary-care doctor as a kind of contractor for patients, reining in pointless testing, procedures, and emergency-room visits, coördinating treatment, and helping to find specialists who practice thoughtfully and effectively. Our technology- and specialty-intensive health system has resisted this kind of role, but countries that have higher proportions of general practitioners have better medical outcomes, better patient experiences, and, according to a European study, lower cost growth. WellMed found insurers who saw these advantages and were willing to pay for this model of care. Today, WellMed has more than a hundred clinics, fifteen hundred primary-care doctors, and around a quarter of a million patients across Texas and Florida."
from instapaper
12 days ago
America’s Epidemic of Unnecessary Care
"Two years into the program, an unexpected pattern is emerging: the biggest savings and improvements in care are coming from avoiding procedures that shouldn’t be done in the first place. Before the participating hospitals operate, their doctors conduct their own evaluation. And, according to Sally Welborn, the senior vice-president for benefits at Walmart, those doctors are finding that around thirty per cent of the spinal procedures that employees were told they needed are inappropriate. Dr. Charles Nussbaum, until recently the head of neurosurgery at Virginia Mason Medical Center, confirmed that large numbers of the patients sent to his hospital for spine surgery do not meet its criteria."
from instapaper
12 days ago
America’s Epidemic of Unnecessary Care
"The main way we’ve tried to stop unnecessary treatments has been through policing by insurers: they could refuse to pay for anything that looked like inappropriate care, whether it was an emergency-room visit, an MRI scan, or an operation. And it worked. During the nineteen-nineties, the “Mother, may I?” strategy flattened health-care costs. But it also provoked a backlash. Faceless corporate bureaucrats second-guessing medical decisions from afar created an infuriating amount of hassle for physicians and patients trying to orchestrate necessary care—and sometimes led to outrageous mistakes. Insurance executives were accused of killing people. Facing a public outcry, they backed off, and health-care costs resumed their climb. A decade and a half later, however, more interesting approaches have emerged."
from instapaper
12 days ago
America’s Epidemic of Unnecessary Care
"The forces that have led to a global epidemic of overtesting, overdiagnosis, and overtreatment are easy to grasp. Doctors get paid for doing more, not less. We’re more afraid of doing too little than of doing too much. And patients often feel the same way. They’re likely to be grateful for the extra test done in the name of “being thorough”—and then for the procedure to address what’s found. Mrs. E. was such a patient."
from instapaper
12 days ago
America’s Epidemic of Unnecessary Care
"We now have a vast and costly health-care industry devoted to finding and responding to turtles. Our ever more sensitive technologies turn up more and more abnormalities—cancers, clogged arteries, damaged-looking knees and backs—that aren’t actually causing problems and never will. And then we doctors try to fix them, even though the result is often more harm than good"
from instapaper
12 days ago
America’s Epidemic of Unnecessary Care
"Overtesting has also created a new, unanticipated problem: overdiagnosis. This isn’t misdiagnosis—the erroneous diagnosis of a disease. This is the correct diagnosis of a disease that is never going to bother you in your lifetime. We’ve long assumed that if we screen a healthy population for diseases like cancer or coronary-artery disease, and catch those diseases early, we’ll be able to treat them before they get dangerously advanced, and save lives in large numbers. But it hasn’t turned out that way. For instance, cancer screening with mammography, ultrasound, and blood testing has dramatically increased the detection of breast, thyroid, and prostate cancer during the past quarter century. We’re treating hundreds of thousands more people each year for these diseases than we ever have. Yet only a tiny reduction in death, if any, has resulted."
from instapaper
12 days ago
America’s Epidemic of Unnecessary Care
"Another powerful force toward unnecessary care emerged years after Arrow’s paper: the phenomenon of overtesting, which is a by-product of all the new technologies we have for peering into the human body. It has been hard for patients and doctors to recognize that tests and scans can be harmful. Why not take a look and see if anything is abnormal? People are discovering why not. The United States is a country of three hundred million people who annually undergo around fifteen million nuclear medicine scans, a hundred million CT and MRI scans, and almost ten billion laboratory tests. Often, these are fishing expeditions, and since no one is perfectly normal you tend to find a lot of fish. If you look closely and often enough, almost everyone will have a little nodule that can’t be completely explained, a lab result that is a bit off, a heart tracing that doesn’t look quite right."
from instapaper
12 days ago
The Cost Conundrum
"As America struggles to extend health-care coverage while curbing health-care costs, we face a decision that is more important than whether we have a public-insurance option, more important than whether we will have a single-payer system in the long run or a mixture of public and private insurance, as we do now. The decision is whether we are going to reward the leaders who are trying to build a new generation of Mayos and Grand Junctions. If we don’t, McAllen won’t be an outlier. It will be our future."
from instapaper
13 days ago
The Cost Conundrum
"This will by necessity be an experiment. We will need to do in-depth research on what makes the best systems successful—the peer-review committees? recruiting more primary-care doctors and nurses? putting doctors on salary?—and disseminate what we learn. Congress has provided vital funding for research that compares the effectiveness of different treatments, and this should help reduce uncertainty about which treatments are best. But we also need to fund research that compares the effectiveness of different systems of care—to reduce our uncertainty about which systems work best for communities. These are empirical, not ideological, questions. And we would do well to form a national institute for health-care delivery, bringing together clinicians, hospitals, insurers, employers, and citizens to assess, regularly, the quality and the cost of our care, review the strategies that produce good results, and make clear recommendations for local systems."
from instapaper
13 days ago
The Cost Conundrum
"This last point is vital. Activists and policymakers spend an inordinate amount of time arguing about whether the solution to high medical costs is to have government or private insurance companies write the checks. Here’s how this whole debate goes. Advocates of a public option say government financing would save the most money by having leaner administrative costs and forcing doctors and hospitals to take lower payments than they get from private insurance. Opponents say doctors would skimp, quit, or game the system, and make us wait in line for our care; they maintain that private insurers are better at policing doctors. No, the skeptics say: all insurance companies do is reject applicants who need health care and stall on paying their bills. Then we have the economists who say that the people who should pay the doctors are the ones who use them. Have consumers pay with their own dollars, make sure that they have some “skin in the game,” and then they’ll get the care they deserve. These arguments miss the main issue. When it comes to making care better and cheaper, changing who pays the doctor will make no more difference than changing who pays the electrician. The lesson of the high-quality, low-cost communities is that someone has to be accountable for the totality of care. Otherwise, you get a system that has no brakes. You get McAllen."
from instapaper
13 days ago
The Cost Conundrum
"When you look across the spectrum from Grand Junction to McAllen—and the almost threefold difference in the costs of care—you come to realize that we are witnessing a battle for the soul of American medicine. Somewhere in the United States at this moment, a patient with chest pain, or a tumor, or a cough is seeing a doctor. And the damning question we have to ask is whether the doctor is set up to meet the needs of the patient, first and foremost, or to maximize revenue."
from instapaper
13 days ago
The Cost Conundrum
"The Mayo Clinic is not an aberration. One of the lowest-cost markets in the country is Grand Junction, Colorado, a community of a hundred and twenty thousand that nonetheless has achieved some of Medicare’s highest quality-of-care scores. Michael Pramenko is a family physician and a local medical leader there. Unlike doctors at the Mayo Clinic, he told me, those in Grand Junction get piecework fees from insurers. But years ago the doctors agreed among themselves to a system that paid them a similar fee whether they saw Medicare, Medicaid, or private-insurance patients, so that there would be little incentive to cherry-pick patients. They also agreed, at the behest of the main health plan in town, an H.M.O., to meet regularly on small peer-review committees to go over their patient charts together. They focussed on rooting out problems like poor prevention practices, unnecessary back operations, and unusual hospital-complication rates. Problems went down. Quality went up. Then, in 2004, the doctors’ group and the local H.M.O. jointly created a regional information network—a community-wide electronic-record system that shared office notes, test results, and hospital data for patients across the area. Again, problems went down. Quality went up. And costs ended up lower than just about anywhere else in the United States."
from instapaper
13 days ago
The Cost Conundrum
"The core tenet of the Mayo Clinic is “The needs of the patient come first”—not the convenience of the doctors, not their revenues. The doctors and nurses, and even the janitors, sat in meetings almost weekly, working on ideas to make the service and the care better, not to get more money out of patients. I asked Cortese how the Mayo Clinic made this possible."
from instapaper
13 days ago
The Cost Conundrum
"About fifteen years ago, it seems, something began to change in McAllen. A few leaders of local institutions took profit growth to be a legitimate ethic in the practice of medicine. Not all the doctors accepted this. But they failed to discourage those who did. So here, along the banks of the Rio Grande, in the Square Dance Capital of the World, a medical community came to treat patients the way subprime-mortgage lenders treated home buyers: as profit centers.

The real puzzle of American health care, I realized on the airplane home, is not why McAllen is different from El Paso. It’s why El Paso isn’t like McAllen. Every incentive in the system is an invitation to go the way McAllen has gone. Yet, across the country, large numbers of communities have managed to control their health costs rather than ratchet them up."
from instapaper
13 days ago
The Cost Conundrum
"Woody Powell is a Stanford sociologist who studies the economic culture of cities. Recently, he and his research team studied why certain regions—Boston, San Francisco, San Diego—became leaders in biotechnology while others with a similar concentration of scientific and corporate talent—Los Angeles, Philadelphia, New York—did not. The answer they found was what Powell describes as the anchor-tenant theory of economic development. Just as an anchor store will define the character of a mall, anchor tenants in biotechnology, whether it’s a company like Genentech, in South San Francisco, or a university like M.I.T., in Cambridge, define the character of an economic community. They set the norms. The anchor tenants that set norms encouraging the free flow of ideas and collaboration, even with competitors, produced enduringly successful communities, while those that mainly sought to dominate did not."
from instapaper
13 days ago
The Cost Conundrum
"Most Americans would be delighted to have the quality of care found in places like Rochester, Minnesota, or Seattle, Washington, or Durham, North Carolina—all of which have world-class hospitals and costs that fall below the national average. If we brought the cost curve in the expensive places down to their level, Medicare’s problems (indeed, almost all the federal government’s budget problems for the next fifty years) would be solved. The difficulty is how to go about it. Physicians in places like McAllen behave differently from others. The $2.4-trillion question is why. Unless we figure it out, health reform will fail."
from instapaper
13 days ago
Eliminating the Human
"We’re a social species—we benefit from passing discoveries on, and we benefit from our tendency to cooperate to achieve what we cannot alone. In his book Sapiens, Yuval Harari claims this is what allowed us to be so successful. He also claims that this cooperation was often facilitated by an ability to believe in “fictions” such as nations, money, religions, and legal institutions. Machines don’t believe in fictions—or not yet, anyway. That’s not to say they won’t surpass us, but if machines are designed to be mainly self-interested, they may hit a roadblock. And in the meantime, if less human interaction enables us to forget how to cooperate, then we lose our advantage."
from instapaper
13 days ago
Eliminating the Human
"When interaction becomes a strange and unfamiliar thing, then we will have changed who and what we are as a species. Often our rational thinking convinces us that much of our interaction can be reduced to a series of logical decisions—but we are not even aware of many of the layers and subtleties of those interactions. As behavioral economists will tell us, we don’t behave rationally, even though we think we do. And Bayesians will tell us that interaction is how we revise our picture of what is going on and what will happen next.

I’d argue there is a danger to democracy as well. Less interaction, even casual interaction, means one can live in a tribal bubble—and we know where that leads."
from instapaper
13 days ago
Opinion | Good News for Young Strivers: Networking Is Overrated
"I don’t mean to suggest that success in any field is meritocratic. It’s dramatically easier to get credit for achievements and break into the elite if you’re male and white, your pedigree is full of fancy degrees and prestigious employers, you come from a family with wealth and connections, and you speak without a foreign accent. (Unless it’s a British accent, which has the uncanny ability to make you sound smart regardless of what words come out of your mouth.) But if you lack these status signals, it’s even more critical to produce a portfolio that proves your potential.

Of course, accomplishments can build your network only if other people are aware of them. You have to put your work out there. It shouldn’t be about promoting yourself, but about promoting your ideas. Evidence shows that tooting your own horn doesn’t help you get a job offer or a board seat, and when employees bend over backward to highlight their skills and accomplishments, they actually get paid less and promoted less. People find self-promotion so distasteful that they like you more when you’re praised by someone else — even if they know you’ve hired an agent to promote you.

So stop fretting about networking. Take a page out of the George Lucas and Sara Blakely playbooks: Make an intriguing film, build a useful product."
from instapaper
14 days ago
Hollywood Has a Huge Millennial Problem
"The sequel machine has, in the last few years, merged with another strategy to deliberately roll out new episodes of comic and fantasy universes, like Marvel, Star Wars, and X-Men. Twenty years ago, in 1996, none of the 10 biggest films were sequels or superhero movies. Films based on comics accounted for just 0.69 percent of the box office. The top-grossing movies included original stories like Twister, The Rock, Ransom, and The First Wives Club. The top-grossing film in 1996 was Independence Day, an original screenplay by director Roland Emmerich and Dean Devlin. (One of the most highly anticipated movies of 2016 is Independence Day: Resurgence, its sequel.) This year, out of the 371 movies released, 4 superhero films—Captain America: Civil War, Deadpool, Batman vs. Superman, and X-Men: Apocalypse—accounted for 29 percent of the total box office. In the biggest picture, Hollywood is in the business of telling stories that people want to see, and when people go to the movies, by and large they want to see sequels of their favorite heroes."
from instapaper
14 days ago
Putting lifelong learning on the CEO agenda
"We are not seers. Still, one thing is clear. In the future, more and more of your people will need to use complex cognitive skills for more and more of their time. Some are already comfortable with this; some are not. As stewards of your company’s value, you need to understand how to get your people ready—not because it’s a nice thing to do but because the competitive advantage of early adopters of advanced algorithms and robotics will rapidly diminish. Simply put, companies will differentiate themselves not just by having the tools but by how their people interact with those tools and make the complex decisions that they must make in the course of doing their work. The greater the use of information-rich tools, the more important the decisions are that are still made by people. That, in turn, increases the importance of continuous learning. Workers, managers, and executives need to keep up with the machines and be able to interpret their results."
from instapaper
14 days ago
Putting lifelong learning on the CEO agenda
"In that kind of world, the future of learning is not in the classroom. It’s in the field—finding ways to do better while doing the work. This won’t happen by chance. You need to model learning behaviors and invest in the development of learning processes and tools. You need to take an appropriately humble stand about the challenges ahead—for you as a leader and for your organization. There is simply no room for arrogance in a highly dynamic and uncertain world. You also need to create a psychologically safe environment in which people feel comfortable taking the risks that come with experimentation and practice; giving and receiving candid feedback; asking questions; and acknowledging failures. Learning must be built into every aspect of the organization.

Another inconvenient truth is that the education and training sector, historically, has not done well in terms of implementing evidence-based, iterative improvements in the learning processes and outcomes it emphasizes. Learning science does exist. It’s just not always, or even often, applied in the workplace. There is very little “learning engineering.”"
from instapaper
14 days ago
The Working Class Can’t Afford the American Dream
"The worst places for working class folks to live shouldn’t surprise anyone who has been paying attention to the affordable housing crises in New York and California. Here are the five worst cities:

1. New York, NY (-$91,184)

2. San Francisco, CA (-$83,272)

3. Boston, MA (-$61,900)

4. Washington, DC (-$50,535)

5. Philadelphia, PA (-$37,850)

You read that correctly. The typical working-class family would need an additional $91K+ per year in New York City just to break even on a reasonable standard of living"
from instapaper
14 days ago
at the edge of your range – Snakes and Ladders
"I’m not a singer, or an artist of any kind, but in my own little realm of work I’ve tried to follow this principle: work at the edge of your range. A couple of times in my career I’ve tried to make myself write books based on what I already knew, and I just couldn’t do it. I have to be discovering something, trying something I haven’t tried before — finding out where my range as a thinker and writer stops. The down side of this habit is that sometimes I have written (and even published) things I didn’t know enough about. That has been embarrassing. But I really can’t seem to do things any other way, and in general I think it’s a good principle. I mean, after all, isn’t that how you extend your range? Unless, of course, you ruin your voice … but let’s not think about that possibility."
from instapaper
16 days ago
More Americans now say they’re spiritual but not religious
"Those who are “spiritual but not religious” are about evenly split between men (47%) and women (53%) – in stark contrast with those who say they are neither religious nor spiritual, 62% of whom are men. Similarly, when it comes to race and ethnicity or age, those who are spiritual but not religious do not look dramatically different from the U.S. public overall, although they do skew a bit younger (for example, just 12% of these adults are ages 65 and older, compared with the 19% of all U.S. adults who are in this age group).

“Spiritual but not religious” Americans are more highly educated than the general public. Seven-in-ten (71%) have attended at least some college, including a third (34%) with college degrees. In addition, they lean Democratic, with 52% identifying with or leaning toward the Democratic Party, compared with 30% who identify as or lean Republican. Those who are neither religious nor spiritual also are more likely to be Democrats (52%). Compared with the spiritual but not religious, the share of Democrats among the religious and spiritual and the religious but not spiritual is lower, at 39% and 41%, respectively."
from instapaper
16 days ago
The Big Idea and Business Books that Debut This Fall
"17. The State of Affairs by Esther Perel (October 10)

Drawing on her expertise as a relationship therapist, the dynamic TED speaker and host of the “Where Should We Begin?” podcast shines a light on one of the last taboo topics of our time. She explains why infidelity sometimes happens even to happy couples—and how we can all build stronger relationships."
from instapaper
16 days ago
The Big Idea and Business Books that Debut This Fall
"14. Creating Great Choices by Jennifer Riel and Roger Martin (September 19)

If you’re trying to plan an organization’s future, this book contains multitudes. Two talented strategists offer vivid stories to unlock your creativity, strong evidence to challenge your assumptions, and practical exercises to sharpen your thinking."
from instapaper
16 days ago
The Big Idea and Business Books that Debut This Fall
"11. Leonardi Da Vinci by Walter Isaacson (October 17)

The biographer of Steve Jobs, Benjamin Franklin, and Albert Einstein takes on the Renaissance Man. It’s a captivating narrative about art and science, curiosity and discipline."
from instapaper
16 days ago
The Big Idea and Business Books that Debut This Fall
"6. Supernormal by Meg Jay (November 14)

This book taught me more about resilience than anything else I've read. With the ear of a therapist and the voice of a novelist, Meg Jay delves deep into the human condition to illuminate how we find strength after suffering"
from instapaper
16 days ago
The Big Idea and Business Books that Debut This Fall
"3. Braving the Wilderness by Brene Brown (September 12)

The popular vulnerability researcher and TED speaker focuses on one of the biggest hurdles of our time: finding a sense of belonging. She challenges us to stand alone and stand out even when we feel intense pressure to fit in."
from instapaper
16 days ago
Transcript of "How boredom can lead to your most brilliant ideas"
"03:51
So this is my brain in an fMRI, and I learned that in the default mode is when we connect disparate ideas, we solve some of our most nagging problems, and we do something called "autobiographical planning." This is when we look back at our lives, we take note of the big moments, we create a personal narrative, and then we set goals and we figure out what steps we need to take to reach them. But now we chill out on the couch also while updating a Google Doc or replying to email. We call it "getting shit done," but here's what neuroscientist Dr. Daniel Levitin says we're actually doing.

04:27
(Audio) Dr. Daniel Levitin: Every time you shift your attention from one thing to another, the brain has to engage a neurochemical switch that uses up nutrients in the brain to accomplish that. So if you're attempting to multitask, you know, doing four or five things at once, you're not actually doing four or five things at once, because the brain doesn't work that way. Instead, you're rapidly shifting from one thing to the next, depleting neural resources as you go.

04:52"
from instapaper
18 days ago
Resource Constraints – AVC
"I have seen companies do amazing things with no money and tiny teams.

I have seen companies do absolutely nothing with all the money in the world and hundreds of engineers.

This experience, built up over thirty plus years in tech and startups, has convinced me that resources are never the limiting factor to doing great things.

The limiting factors are;

having great management that can make the right decisions and drive exection
knowing what to do and what not to do
playing your game and not someone else’s"
from instapaper
19 days ago
Let’s hear it for the four-hour working day
"That, anyway, is the persuasive conclusion reached by Alex Pang in his book Rest: Why You Get More Done When You Work Less. This column has evangelised before about the truth of that subtitle, what with the nine-to-five being a relic of the industrial revolution with no relevance to modern “knowledge work” – but what’s so striking about Pang’s argument is its specificity. Ranging across history and creative fields, he keeps encountering the same thing. Charles Darwin worked for two 90-minute periods in the morning, then an hour later on; the mathematician Henri Poincaré from 10am till noon then 5pm till 7pm; the same approximate stretch features in the daily routines of Thomas Jefferson, Alice Munro, John le Carré and many more. To avoid charges of confirmation bias (what if he’s only mentioning those who prove his point?) Pang draws on the research of the Swedish psychologist Anders Ericsson, whose studies of violinists – also the basis for the much-debated “10,000-hour rule” – support the same finding. We’re rhythmic creatures, and the part of the cycle that involves not taxing the mind is no less essential to the result."
from instapaper
19 days ago
Opinion | You’ll Never Be Famous — And That’s O.K.
"This is Eliot’s final word on Dorothea: “Her full nature, like that river which Cyrus broke the strength, spent itself in channels which had no great name on the earth. But the effect of her being on those around her was incalculably diffusive: for the growing good of the world is partly dependent on unhistoric acts; and that things are not so ill with you and me as they might have been is half owing to the number who lived faithfully a hidden life, and rest in unvisited tombs.”

It’s one of the most beautiful passages in literature, and it encapsulates what a meaningful life is about: connecting and contributing to something beyond the self, in whatever humble form that may take."
from instapaper
19 days ago
The Leftovers is one of the best TV shows ever made
"What made The Leftovers special — and what most of my favorite TV shows have in common, come to think of it — is that it forced you to open that door and leave it that way permanently. It was incredibly comfortable letting you struggle with its implications, rather than providing tidy summations. Even when it answered its biggest questions, it did so in a way that suggested the answers might be bullshit, because what matters isn’t the answer, per se, but whether you believe the person who’s offering it to you.

The Leftovers, then, is the first TV show I can think of that actively engages with a world where the uncertainty that is core to simply being alive has caused a lot of us to carve out our own completely separate experiences of reality. The series begins with the sudden disappearance of 2 percent of the world’s population, but its objective isn’t to answer the question of where those people went. Whatever the answer is, regardless of whether it’s simple or mind-bogglingly complex, will pale in comparison to the fact that when millions of people just up and vanished one day, everyone on Earth was reminded that much of existence is basically random, meaningless, and out of our control. What do you do when you’re confronted with that fact?"
from instapaper
21 days ago
Large diet study suggests it's carbs, not fats, that are bad for your health
"The researchers also noted that a very low intake of saturated fats (below 3 percent of daily diet) was associated with a higher risk of death in the study, compared to diets containing up to 13 percent daily.

At the same time, high-carb diets -- containing an average 77 percent carbohydrates -- were associated with a 28 percent increased risk of death versus low-carb diets, Dehghan said.

"The study showed that contrary to popular belief, increased consumption of dietary fats is associated with a lower risk of death," Dehghan said."
from instapaper
21 days ago
my writing advice – Snakes and Ladders
"Find the time of day when you do your best thinking — when your intellectual energy is at its highest — and set that time aside for writing. (If that’s impossible because of work or other responsibilities, then find the best time that’s available to you.) Then preserve that time. Be flexible and generous all the other hours of the day, but be rigid and ruthless about your writing time.
Write to think. Don’t try to know where you’re going before you start writing, but write to find out what you think, or find the story you need to tell. Never expect that a particular time-unit of writing will produce a given number of publishable words. You must learn to think of your writing time as a period of discovery, in which you find out what you think, or what images and rhythms tend to emerge from your mind, or where a story seems to want to go. If you focus on discovery, then something worth sharing with others will emerge, in its own way and on its own schedule. But that’s not the kind of thing that can be forced. Allow yourself the freedom to explore."
from instapaper
24 days ago
A Breathing Technique to Focus the Mind - NEUROHACKER COLLECTIVE
"The Basics:
* On the inhale, expand the belly, then the diaphragm, then the upper chest. On the exhale, let the breath go first from the upper chest, then the ribcage, then the belly. This helps you relearn how to breathe deeply.
* Inhale and exhale solely through the nose. It stimulates the nerves that activate the parasympathetic nervous system and counters the fear response of the sympathetic nervous system.

Steps:
* Inhale for a count of 5.
* Retain and hold the breath for a count of 5.
* Exhale all the breath from the lungs for a count of 5.
* Retain and hold the breath for a count of 5.
* Repeat.

Length: Start with 1-3 minute “spot drills” several times a day before an important meeting or event. Work up to 5-10 minutes a day.

And that’s it!"
from instapaper
24 days ago
FYS 2017: Living and Thinking in a Digital Age – Snakes and Ladders
"Here’s a handy list of organizational tools you might try, starting with digital ones:

emacs org-mode
Evernote
Google Keep
OneNote
Pinboard
Trello
Workflowy
Zotero
And now analog (paper-based) ones:

Bullet Journal
Hipster PDA
Noguchi filing system
Personal Kanban
Zettelkasten
Here’s a guide to helping you think through the options — keyed to the Getting Things Done system, which is fine, though it’s not the only useful system out there. The key to this assignment is that you choose a tool and seriously commit to it, for this semester, anyway. You are of course welcome to ditch it as soon as the term is over. But what I am asking for is a semester-long experiment, so that you will have detailed information to share with the rest of us. N.B.: All the options I am suggesting here are free — if you want to pay for an app or service, you are certainly welcome to, but I wouldn’t ask that of you."
from instapaper
29 days ago
Learning to Learn: You, Too, Can Rewire Your Brain
"FOCUS/DON’T The brain has two modes of thinking that Dr. Oakley simplifies as “focused,” in which learners concentrate on the material, and “diffuse,” a neural resting state in which consolidation occurs — that is, the new information can settle into the brain. (Cognitive scientists talk about task-positive networks and default-mode networks, respectively, in describing the two states.) In diffuse mode, connections between bits of information, and unexpected insights, can occur. That’s why it’s helpful to take a brief break after a burst of focused work."
from instapaper
29 days ago
Karl Ove Knausgaard: By the Book
"When you see something, information flows from the eyes and to the back of the brain. The interesting thing is that more information is going the other way, which means that we see what we think we see, and the actual process involving the eyes is a question of correcting what’s already there. I have always suspected something like that! But I got it confirmed in a book called “The Brain: The Story of You,” by David Eagleman. I picked it up at an airport recently and didn’t stop reading it till I came home five hours later. I also learned that the act of seeing involves the whole body and all the other senses — it is not an abstract enterprise, but very physical — and that the things observed always come together in the brain with a delay, so that we basically live in the past. Everything we see has already happened. And finally, that the feeling of flow we all know, when we are so deeply immersed in something that we lose track of time and who we are, has a neurological explanation: In a state of flow, the activity in the frontal lobe is reduced, it is almost shut down — and it is in the frontal lobe the ability for abstract thinking situated, the planning for the future and the sense of self. Everything that makes us human, in other words, and that makes perfect sense: You lose yourself and sink into a state of pure being, like an animal — belonging to the world, not to yourself."
from instapaper
29 days ago
What Kind of Father Lets His Son Play Football?
"Malcolm Gladwell is right: I'm out of my mind to let my son play football. I know what the game can do to you, to him. But I also know what it can do for him. And sure that's cliché, but so are all sports stories and it doesn't mean it's not true. How do some parents abide their sons/daughters enlisting in the military? Or becoming police officers? And how is “sometimes in life you have to fight” not a cliché, too? But sometimes you do. We all do."
from instapaper
29 days ago
Google Forms: Turn On Quiz Features - Teacher Tech
"The quiz feature in Google Classroom is not as powerful as using the spreadsheet Add-on Flubaroo (flubaroo.com). One of my favorite features in Flubaroo is the ability to send a personalized feedback note to each student. Flubaroo sends student scores and feedback to their email and/or to a file in Google Drive. This is especially important if your school does not have email enabled for students.

To use Flubaroo you will need to create a spreadsheet for your quiz. Click on the “Responses” tab when editing your Google Form and click on the spreadsheet icon.

In the spreadsheet, use the Add-on menu and find the add-on “Flubaroo.” Flubaroo will grade your student responses in the spreadsheet and give you options to manually grade some questions and send personalized feedback."
from instapaper
29 days ago
Pay Your Executives What They’re Really Worth
"Creating a compensation package that adheres to the four guiding principles is not easy for a board. Directors need to debate multiple metrics (financial and nonfinancial alike), align them with the company’s strategy and values, calibrate them with the risk appetite of the firm, and select an appropriate peer group to use as benchmarks. But this is ultimately what a board is there to do. If it uses executive compensation packages as a way to reinforce the company’s competitive strategy and manage its risks, so much the better. Not only will it be more effective at communicating the strategy and rationale for top management pay with shareholders but it will also ensure that senior managers execute against the right objectives. Remember: Executives will do their best to hit whatever goals are set. So set targets that work for the corporation."
from instapaper
29 days ago
The Boston Rally Exposed the Left’s Intolerance of Free Speech
"Freddie is someone I barely know in physical space, but feel intensely close to. In the years of hourly blogging, he was one of a handful of people I always tried to read and who guest-blogged for me on my vacations. I happily gave space to someone whose views are very different than mine because they were so sincerely held, so clearly expressed, and he was capable of challenging his own side. There was something of Orwell in him. But I also discovered in those years what he found out: that living online is deeply dangerous to mental and physical health, that the pressures of the online crowd can overwhelm individual thought, and, in the end, thought itself. Twitter is not a place to air diverse viewpoints; it is a desiccating swarm of like-mindedness, moving as a single mutating mass, shimmering with every minuscule ripple in the news cycle, destroying all perspective, undermining learning, destroying the very process of reading, and deeply corrosive of a liberal society. If you are in the middle of the online stream, as I was for a decade and a half, and you are intelligent and attempt to be conscientious and honest, the emotional toll will be crushing. If, like Freddie, you are already bipolar, it is a deeply unsafe space."
from instapaper
29 days ago
Rhythm of Breathing Affects Memory and Fear
"In the study, individuals were able to identify a fearful face more quickly if they encountered the face when breathing in compared to breathing out. Individuals also were more likely to remember an object if they encountered it on the inhaled breath than the exhaled one. The effect disappeared if breathing was through the mouth.

“One of the major findings in this study is that there is a dramatic difference in brain activity in the amygdala and hippocampus during inhalation compared with exhalation,” said lead author Christina Zelano, assistant professor of neurology at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine. “When you breathe in, we discovered you are stimulating neurons in the olfactory cortex, amygdala and hippocampus, all across the limbic system.”

The study was published Dec. 6 in the Journal of Neuroscience."
from instapaper
29 days ago
Opinion | Tips for Aspiring Op-Ed Writers
"8) Be proleptic, a word that comes from the Greek for “anticipation.” That is, get the better of the major objection to your argument by raising and answering it in advance. Always offer the other side’s strongest case, not the straw man. Doing so will sharpen your own case and earn the respect of your reader."
from instapaper
29 days ago
Opinion | Tips for Aspiring Op-Ed Writers
"1) A wise editor once observed that the easiest decision a reader can make is to stop reading. This means that every sentence has to count in grabbing the reader’s attention, starting with the first. Get to the point: Why does your topic matter? Why should it matter today? And why should the reader care what you, of all people, have to say about it?"
from instapaper
29 days ago
Pay Your Executives What They’re Really Worth
This problem goes away if you set multiple targets, such as EPS and revenue growth and new product introductions and R&D investment level (say, as a percentage of sales). It’s very hard to game multiple interconnected targets simultaneously, and it becomes more difficult as the number of targets rises. Senior executives just don’t have the time to do it. This was, in fact, what our data showed: Executives who had to achieve multiple goals to receive their bonuses were just as likely to miss a given target as they were to exceed it. Statistically, this is what you’d expect to see if no manipulation has taken place. In contrast, it is highly unlikely statistically that executives will just overperform most of the time. Such results are an indication that they are actively managing to their targets.
Finance 
4 weeks ago
Why Do Rich People Love Endurance Sports?
"Another reason white-collar workers are flocking to endurance sports has to do with the sheer physicality involved. For a study published in the Journal of Consumer Research this past February, researchers from the Cardiff Business School in Wales set out to understand why people with desk jobs are attracted to grueling athletic events. They interviewed 26 Tough Mudder participants and read online forums dedicated to obstacle course racing. What emerged was a resounding theme: the pursuit of pain.

“By flooding the consciousness with gnawing unpleasantness, pain provides a temporary relief from the burdens of self-awareness,” write the researchers. “When leaving marks and wounds, pain helps consumers create the story of a fulfilled life. In a context of decreased physicality, [obstacle course races] play a major role in selling pain to the saturated selves of knowledge workers, who use pain as a way to simultaneously escape reflexivity and craft their life narrative.” The pursuit of pain has become so common among well-to-do endurance athletes that scientific articles have been written about what researchers are calling “white-collar rhabdomyolysis,” referring to a condition in which extreme exercise causes kidney damage."
from instapaper
6 weeks ago
Aziz Ansari on Quitting the Internet, Loneliness, and Season 3 of ‘Master of None’
"I heard you deleted the Internet from your phone. And that you deleted Twitter and Instagram and e-mail. No way that's true, right?
It is! Whenever you check for a new post on Instagram or whenever you go on The New York Times to see if there's a new thing, it's not even about the content. It's just about seeing a new thing. You get addicted to that feeling. You're not going to be able to control yourself. So the only way to fight that is to take yourself out of the equation and remove all these things. What happens is, eventually you forget about it. You don't care anymore. When I first took the browser off my phone, I'm like, [gasp] How am I gonna look stuff up? But most of the shit you look up, it's not stuff you need to know. All those websites you read while you're in a cab, you don't need to look at any of that stuff. It's better to just sit and be in your own head for a minute. I wanted to stop that thing where I get home and look at websites for an hour and a half, checking to see if there's a new thing. And read a book instead. I've been doing it for a couple months, and it's worked. I'm reading, like, three books right now. I'm putting something in my mind. It feels so much better than just reading the Internet and not remembering anything."
from instapaper
6 weeks ago
the mystery of Google’s position – Snakes and Ladders
"I think the third option above is the most likely, with the fourth the next-best candidate, but I seriously doubt that Google will get much more specific. Their goal will be to create a climate of maximal fear-of-offending, and that is best done by never allowing employees to know where the uncrossable lines are. That is, after all, corporate SOP.

It’s going to be really, really difficult to get reliable information about what happened here and why it happened, not just because Google will want to be evasive, and will be encouraged by its lawyers to be evasive, but also because, as Conor Friedersdorf pointed out, the misrepresentations of and straightforward lies about Damore’s memo are pervasive: “I cannot remember the last time so many outlets and observers mischaracterized so many aspects of a text everyone possessed.”"
from instapaper
6 weeks ago
Answers to your questions about Ulysses 2.5 for iOS
"Notes are pretty self-explanatory. I’m the type of writer who, in the past, added ideas and notes to the bottom of the document I’m writing in. Now I add them to the Ulysses attachment sidebar for a few reasons.

One is that they’re easy to get out of the way when I don’t need them anymore and just want to focus on writing. My other big reason is that I do enough work that requires specific word counts, and having all those notes in the document I’m writing messes with those counts. However, I do have a pro-tip here: if you display Ulysses’ word count bar (the speed dial button on the left of the text shortcut bar) and select some text, the bar will update live to show you the character count of just your selection. This is useful, but I still prefer to keep notes in the sidebar."
from instapaper
6 weeks ago
Review: Ulysses 2.5 for iPad and, now, iPhone
"Writing Goals is another of my favorite Ulysses features, and it does exactly what it might sound like. You can set a goal for any number of metrics, including words, sentences, lines, paragraphs, and pages, then set a limit of "about," "at least," or "at most." Your progress towards this goal is displayed as a colored pie chart in the sidebar, and any sheet that has a goal gets a small badge of that chart on it in a sheet list.

Even better, if you're working on a large, multi-sheet project like a book or, say, a lengthy review of an iOS writing app for MacStories, you can assign a goal to an entire Group. That Group also gets a small badge counter when viewing a list of Groups."
from instapaper
6 weeks ago
Review: Ulysses 2.5 for iPad and, now, iPhone
"Ulysses supports Groups (Folders) and sub-groups for organization, but things get interesting with Favorites and Filters. You can mark a sheet as a Favorite to make it appear in a dedicated, top-level Favorites section. It's a great tool for focusing on current projects and getting back to them quickly, and one of my favorite features."
from instapaper
6 weeks ago
Letter of Recommendation: Duolingo
"Learning a language to fluency requires discipline, frequent practice, ideally immersion — much more than a simple language-learning game can offer. That’s fine, though. Fluency stopped being my goal a while ago, when I realized that trying to master several different foreign languages in the span of a few months would only be another stress-inducing, insurmountable project, exactly the sort of thing that led me to seek distractions in the first place. More than anything, though, Duolingo made me confident in my decision-making — I had good taste in bad ways to spend my time."
from instapaper
7 weeks ago
Have Smartphones Destroyed a Generation?
"What’s the connection between smartphones and the apparent psychological distress this generation is experiencing? For all their power to link kids day and night, social media also exacerbate the age-old teen concern about being left out. Today’s teens may go to fewer parties and spend less time together in person, but when they do congregate, they document their hangouts relentlessly—on Snapchat, Instagram, Facebook. Those not invited to come along are keenly aware of it. Accordingly, the number of teens who feel left out has reached all-time highs across age groups. Like the increase in loneliness, the upswing in feeling left out has been swift and significant."
from instapaper
7 weeks ago
Tim Urban: How He Turned His Blog Into A Global Movement
"Schawbel: What are your top three pieces of career advice?

Urban:

1. Think hard about whether you’ll be a happier person if you’re working for someone or for yourself. I don’t think the answer is as obvious as people think, and each of those is very right for some people and very wrong for others. It’s a fundamentally different type of career, so maybe try experiencing a little bit of both to help you decide.

2. Try to ignore conventional wisdom if you can. It tends to be unnecessarily fear-based and terribly outdated. Instead, read the books of people you admire and hear what they say about careers.

3. You might think you can be happy without work/life balance, but it’s a trap. You can’t. And you don’t need to. You can be a prolific creator/producer working 40 hours a week, if you actually put in 40 real hours of work each week."
from instapaper
7 weeks ago
Have Smartphones Destroyed a Generation?
"You might expect that teens spend so much time in these new spaces because it makes them happy, but most data suggest that it does not. The Monitoring the Future survey, funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse and designed to be nationally representative, has asked 12th-graders more than 1,000 questions every year since 1975 and queried eighth- and 10th-graders since 1991. The survey asks teens how happy they are and also how much of their leisure time they spend on various activities, including nonscreen activities such as in-person social interaction and exercise, and, in recent years, screen activities such as using social media, texting, and browsing the web. The results could not be clearer: Teens who spend more time than average on screen activities are more likely to be unhappy, and those who spend more time than average on nonscreen activities are more likely to be happy."
from instapaper
7 weeks ago
Have Smartphones Destroyed a Generation?
"If you were going to give advice for a happy adolescence based on this survey, it would be straightforward: Put down the phone, turn off the laptop, and do something—anything—that does not involve a screen. Of course, these analyses don’t unequivocally prove that screen time causes unhappiness; it’s possible that unhappy teens spend more time online. But recent research suggests that screen time, in particular social-media use, does indeed cause unhappiness. One study asked college students with a Facebook page to complete short surveys on their phone over the course of two weeks. They’d get a text message with a link five times a day, and report on their mood and how much they’d used Facebook. The more they’d used Facebook, the unhappier they felt, but feeling unhappy did not subsequently lead to more Facebook use.

Social-networking sites like Facebook promise to connect us to friends. But the portrait of iGen teens emerging from the data is one of a lonely, dislocated generation. Teens who visit social-networking sites every day but see their friends in person less frequently are the most likely to agree with the statements “A lot of times I feel lonely,” “I often feel left out of things,” and “I often wish I had more good friends.” Teens’ feelings of loneliness spiked in 2013 and have remained high since."
from instapaper
7 weeks ago
This Googler Explains How To Design Your Time Rather Than Manage It
"I start by dividing my work responsibilities into four quadrants:

People development (managing my teams, coaching, mentoring)
Business operations (data analysis, running sales meetings)
Transactional tasks (one-off things like responding to an email or reviewing a budget)
Representative tasks (serving as a “face” for the business, like having drinks with customers or speaking at conferences)"
from instapaper
8 weeks ago
Time-maximizing strategies of highly-successful people | MIT Sloan Executive Education
"Handle your email
Business leaders, CEOs, and managers often receive hundreds, if not thousands, of emails a day. Most would agree that email is necessary, but extremely distracting. Pozen recommends checking your email only every hour or two, and then skipping the majority of them because "you can see from the subject line that they are not important." Unless you're on vacation, it's equally important to handle emails immediately and only once. Waiting to respond to an email only means you'll waste time later relocating it, re-reading it, and thinking about the issues all over again. Slightly more extreme, Tim Ferriss, well-known "life hacker" and author of The Four Hour Work Week, advises checking email only twice a day (such as 11 a.m. and 4 p.m.). To further curtail your email impulses, he suggests setting up an autoresponse, which indicates that you’ll be checking email twice per day or less."
from instapaper
8 weeks ago
One surprising way money can buy happiness, according to scientists
"If you look at the many scientific studies on how to buy happiness, you find evidence supporting several other ways. Buying material goods, especially those that match our personality, can satisfy our need for establishing or expressing our identity. Spending money on others “pro-socially” — through charitable giving or to improve relationships with people we care about — fulfills our desire for human connections. And investing in experiences has been repeatedly shown to increase happiness.

Especially beneficial are experiences that help us develop new skills or apply our talents in novel ways and make us feel more confident, Howell said.

There’s no magic answer for how to stretch our dollars to achieve maximum happiness, but for many people, spending money to save time and improve well-being isn’t even on their radar. DeVoe hopes this research will give people a more concrete understanding of the abstract value of investing in free time."
from instapaper
8 weeks ago
Four keys to successful digital transformations in healthcare
"Indeed, never before have so many technologies with the potential to affect the healthcare industry matured so quickly en masse. Next-generation genomics; big data and advanced analytics; machine learning and automation programs; connected, sensor-enabled devices and wearables; 3-D printing; and robotics—all have the potential to fundamentally change the way healthcare companies develop products and provide services. Consumers are more informed about and more engaged in healthcare decisions because of technology, and regulators and policy makers are advocating for the development of open data and technology standards as well as knowledge-sharing initiatives among companies in the industry."
from instapaper
9 weeks ago
Four keys to successful digital transformations in healthcare
"Our experience with companies inside and outside the healthcare ecosystem suggests there are four core principles for succeeding with this kind of all-encompassing change program. Healthcare companies first need to identify and prioritize their critical sources of value; they need to identify the products and services they provide that lead to competitive differentiation and that would benefit most from digitization. Second, they must build their service-delivery capabilities—not just in physically integrating and managing new digital technologies but also in implementing new approaches to product development and distribution (for instance, agile and DevOps methodologies). Third, healthcare companies should look for ways to modernize their IT foundations, for example upgrading pools of talent and expertise in the IT organization, moving to digital platforms such as cloud servers and software-as-a-service products, managing data as a strategic asset, and improving security protocols for the company’s most vital assets. And fourth, companies must ensure that they build and maintain core management competencies. In other words, all the enablers that allow them to pursue a successful digital agenda."
from instapaper
9 weeks ago
What executives should know about open data
"Not all data that’s valuable is internal and proprietary. New initiatives by governments as diverse as those of the United States, Mexico, and Singapore are opening the spigots of readily usable public data. Corporate information too is becoming more “liquid,” moving across the economy as companies begin sharing data with their business partners and, sometimes, consumers. Also surging is the richness of the information from data aggregators, which are assembling, rendering anonymous, and selling (to interested third parties) a wide range of data flows. Then add huge volumes of data from social-media interactions, available from providers of digital platforms such as Twitter and Facebook. 1. Data sets range from completely open to completely closed, across four dimensions: accessibility (the range of users permitted to access the data), machine readability (the ease with which the data can be processed automatically), cost (the price to obtain data), and rights (limitations on the use, transformation, and distribution of the data)."
from instapaper
9 weeks ago
« earlier      
222 331 395 academia academics advertising advice advising africa aging ai anxiety apple art artist arttickyoulations audi authenticity automationessay balance baltimore beauty bias bible biking blog book books bookx brand business capitalism career case cca change china choice christianity cities cocktails coding coffee comedy communication community competition confidence conservatism conservative consulting creativity csr culture cura data dating decision decisions design development diet discipline doubt douthat drink eating economic economics economy education efficiency ehr emerson emotion entrepreneur entrepreneurship essay ethics exed existential exlearn facebook failure faith family fashion film finance fitness food friendship gender ggplot girls government gr graphic graphics growth habit happiness hbr hdb health healthcare history home hope hopesa house hr humor identity immigration individualism industry inequality innovation interview investing ipo itfbook itn jobs jobsact justice lab language leadership learn learning liberal liberalism life lmt location london love management markdown market marketing marriage maturity mckinsey medeasel medicare meditation memory method methods millennial mindfullness mktstrat mobile moderate moral morality motivation movies music negotiation netflix network news novel nutrition obama ocw omnifocus operations parenting paris paul perception personal personality personhood perspectives philosophy photography pige poetry policy politics poverty power productivity progress psychology quantitative r race read recipes relationship relationships religion research review rhodes risk rstudio running science scripture segmentation self sexuality simon social socialmedia sociology sorority southafrica sports startup stats story strategy structure stryker summerfunding tax taylor teaching technology television testing theology therapy thiel tiff tobuy tolisten toread towatch travel trump tv uber umich university urban utopia value values vc venture video violence virtue virtues visual visualization vocation wdi wire wisdom work workflow writing youth

Copy this bookmark:



description:


tags: