Americans Want to Believe Jobs Are the Solution to Poverty. They’re Not.
"Last year, Vanessa received a tax return of around $5,000, which included earned-income and child tax credits. They helped raise her income, but not above the poverty line. If the working poor are doing better than the nonworking poor, which is the case, it’s not so much because of their jobs per se, but because their employment status provides them access to desperately needed government help. This has caused growing inequality below the poverty line, with the working poor receiving much more social aid than the abandoned nonworking poor or the precariously employed, who are plunged into destitution."
from instapaper
5 days ago
Americans Want to Believe Jobs Are the Solution to Poverty. They’re Not.
"Since 1973, American productivity has increased by 77 percent, while hourly pay has grown by only 12 percent. If the federal minimum wage tracked productivity, it would be more than $20 an hour, not today’s poverty wage of $7.25.

American workers are being shut out of the profits they are helping to generate. The decline of unions is a big reason. During the 20th century, inequality in America decreased when unionization increased, but economic transformations and political attacks have crippled organized labor, emboldening corporate interests and disempowering the rank and file. This imbalanced economy explains why America’s poverty rate has remained consistent over the past several decades, even as per capita welfare spending has increased. It’s not that safety-net programs don’t help; on the contrary, they lift millions of families above the poverty line each year. But one of the most effective antipoverty solutions is a decent-paying job, and those have become scarce for people like Vanessa. Today, 41.7 million laborers — nearly a third of the American work force — earn less than $12 an hour, and almost none of their employers offer health insurance."
from instapaper
5 days ago
Americans Want to Believe Jobs Are the Solution to Poverty. They’re Not.
"In May, Vanessa finally secured a spot in public housing. But for almost three years, she had belonged to the “working homeless,” a now-necessary phrase in today’s low-wage/high-rent society. She is a home health aide, the same job her mother had until her knees and back gave out. Her work uniform is Betty Boop scrubs, sneakers and an ID badge that hangs on a red Bayada Home Healthcare lanyard. Vanessa works steady hours and likes her job, even the tougher bits like bathing the infirm or hoisting someone out of bed with a Hoyer lift. “I get to help people,” she said, “and be around older people and learn a lot of stuff from them.” Her rate fluctuates: She gets $10 an hour for one client, $14 for another. It doesn’t have to do with the nature of the work — “Sometimes the hardest ones can be the cheapest ones,” Vanessa said — but with reimbursement rates, which differ according to the client’s health care coverage. After juggling the kids and managing her diabetes, Vanessa is able to work 20 to 30 hours a week, which earns her around $1,200 a month. And that’s when things go well."
from instapaper
5 days ago
Can Mark Zuckerberg Fix Facebook Before It Breaks Democracy?
"Facebook had adopted a buccaneering motto, “Move fast and break things,” which celebrated the idea that it was better to be flawed and first than careful and perfect. Andrew Bosworth, a former Harvard teaching assistant who is now one of Zuckerberg’s longest-serving lieutenants and a member of his inner circle, explained, “A failure can be a form of success. It’s not the form you want, but it can be a useful thing to how you learn.” In Zuckerberg’s view, skeptics were often just fogies and scolds. “There’s always someone who wants to slow you down,” he said in a commencement address at Harvard last year. “In our society, we often don’t do big things because we’re so afraid of making mistakes that we ignore all the things wrong today if we do nothing. The reality is, anything we do will have issues in the future. But that can’t keep us from starting.”"
from instapaper
6 days ago
Can Mark Zuckerberg Fix Facebook Before It Breaks Democracy?
"New hires learned that a crucial measure of the company’s performance was how many people had logged in to Facebook on six of the previous seven days, a measurement known as L6/7. “You could say it’s how many people love this service so much they use it six out of seven days,” Parakilas, who left the company in 2012, said. “But, if your job is to get that number up, at some point you run out of good, purely positive ways. You start thinking about ‘Well, what are the dark patterns that I can use to get people to log back in?’ ”

Facebook engineers became a new breed of behaviorists, tweaking levers of vanity and passion and susceptibility. The real-world effects were striking. In 2012, when Chan was in medical school, she and Zuckerberg discussed a critical shortage of organs for transplant, inspiring Zuckerberg to add a small, powerful nudge on Facebook: if people indicated that they were organ donors, it triggered a notification to friends, and, in turn, a cascade of social pressure. Researchers later found that, on the first day the feature appeared, it increased official organ-donor enrollment more than twentyfold nationwide."
from instapaper
6 days ago
Can Mark Zuckerberg Fix Facebook Before It Breaks Democracy?
"Then, in 2007, growth plateaued at around fifty million users and wouldn’t budge. Other social networks had maxed out at around that level, and Facebook employees wondered if they had hit a hidden limit. Zuckerberg created a special Growth Team, which had broad latitude to find ways of boosting the numbers. Among other fixes, they discovered that, by offering the site in more languages, they could open huge markets. Alex Schultz, a founding member of the Growth Team, said that he and his colleagues were fanatical in their pursuit of expansion. “You will fight for that inch, you will die for that inch,” he told me. Facebook left no opportunity untapped. In 2011, the company asked the Federal Election Commission for an exemption to rules requiring the source of funding for political ads to be disclosed. In filings, a Facebook lawyer argued that the agency “should not stand in the way of innovation.”"
from instapaper
6 days ago
Can Mark Zuckerberg Fix Facebook Before It Breaks Democracy?
"If Facebook were a country, it would have the largest population on earth. More than 2.2 billion people, about a third of humanity, log in at least once a month. That user base has no precedent in the history of American enterprise. Fourteen years after it was founded, in Zuckerberg’s dorm room, Facebook has as many adherents as Christianity"
from instapaper
7 days ago
Something to look forward to
A goal that isn’t too important makes you live in the moment, and still gives you a driving force. This driving force is a way to get around the fact that we will all die and there is no real point to life.

But with the ASG there is a point. It is not such an important point that you postpone joy to achieve it. It is just a decoy point that keeps you bobbing along, allowing you to find ecstacy in the small things, the unexpected, and the everyday.

What happens when you reach the stupid goal? Then what? You just find a new ASG.
future  goals 
12 days ago
Behind Nike’s Decision to Stand by Colin Kaepernick
"At the same time, Nike’s decision isn’t so much a defiant recognition of dissent as an acknowledgment of the directions in which sports culture has already travelled. In 1988, Nike promoted the image of a solitary senior citizen running on a bridge not, presumably, because it was looking to break into the octogenarian market but because it was hoping to sell inspiration. The company seems to have aligned itself with Kaepernick for the same reason. While some people rage that, yet again, in America, an ingrate-rebel has been rewarded, there is another narrative that Kaepernick conjures—that of an individual, driven by conscience, fighting a lonely crusade against forces more powerful than he. The odds are far outside of his favor, but no matter, he persists. In this telling, Kaepernick the subversive is transformed into something more legible, more familiar—an American character whom Steinbeck might have imagined. Goliath has size and strength, but David is the one with the compelling story."
from instapaper
13 days ago
On Being Midwestern
"Glory Boughton, the narrator, longs for the “anonymity” and “impersonal landscape” of a “vast, cold city” (Chicago, Minneapolis, Milwaukee). She longs for “deracination,” for the sense of being an anyone moving through an anyplace. Why should a person long for this? Anonymity is usually felt as a burden, and the sense that one is a mere “basic person” can imprison as much as it liberates.

Yet the passage resonates, because we humans need to feel that we are more than our communities, more than our histories, more even than ourselves. We need to feel this because it is true. The cultural conservative ideal, with its deeply rooted communities—an idea that finds a strange echo in the less nuanced kinds of identity politics—is a reduction as dangerous to human flourishing and self-understanding as is the reduction of the mind to the brain or the soul to the body. The “deeply rooted community” is, in reality, at least as often as not, a cesspit of nasty gossips, an echo chamber in which minor misunderstandings amplify until they prevent people from seeing each other accurately, or at all."
from instapaper
14 days ago
On Being Midwestern
"Thus, while Southern history yields story after story of the most savage, intimate racist violence—of men castrated and barbecued before smiling crowds, dressed as for a picnic—Midwestern history is a study in racial quarantine.31 Midwestern cities often dominate in rankings of the country’s most segregated. And though the region has seen its share of Klan activity and outright lynchings—I write this days after the acquittal of the St. Anthony, Minnesota, police officer who killed Philando Castile—the Midwest’s racism most frequently appears in the history books in the form of riots: Detroit, 1943; Cleveland, 1966; Milwaukee, Cincinnati, and Detroit again, 1967; Chicago, Cincinnati again, and Kansas City, 1968; Detroit again, 1975; Cincinnati again, 2001; Ferguson, 2014; Milwaukee again, 2016. A riot is, among other things, a refusal to be quarantined."
from instapaper
14 days ago
On Being Midwestern
"If it is not the Midwest that is missing from American history or culture, or even from the national conversation, but simply a Midwestern “regional consciousness,” as Cayton puts it, one naturally wonders whether such a category is important in the first place. Do Midwesterners need another “grid” (to borrow a term from the social critic George W.S. Trow) on which to plot their own lives? We already have families, towns and cities, a country, a species. Perhaps we are simply Americans, with no need for further differentiation."
from instapaper
14 days ago
On Being Midwestern
"Historically, when people in the Midwest argue with each other over questions of identity, they fight over issues on universal, national, or local levels. They talk about what it means to be an American, a Lutheran, a farmer, a woman, a lesbian, a feminist, a black man; they almost never talk about what it means to be Midwestern, except in the most cursory fashion. In trying to locate a “heartland code,” one ethicist found that residents of the St. Louis area invoked generalities, such as “respect for family,” “respect for religion,” “respect for education,” “honesty,” “selflessness,” and “respect for the environment.” They rarely got more specific than that.… In virtually all the recent work on the Midwest, it remains a setting, not a particular constellation of attitudes or behaviors.15"
from instapaper
14 days ago
The Jordan Peterson All-Meat Diet
"The allure of a strict code for eating—a way to divide the world into good foods and bad foods, angels and demons—may be especially strong at a time when order feels in short supply. Indeed there is at least some benefit to be had from any and all dietary advice, or rules for life, so long as a person believes in them, and so long as they provide a code that allows a person to feel good for having stuck with it and a cohort of like-minded adherents. The challenge is to find a code that accords as best as possible with scientific evidence about what is good and bad, and with what is best for the world."
from instapaper
15 days ago
How to Fall Asleep in 120 Seconds – Member Feature Stories – Medium
"Luckily, you never have to be. The U.S. Navy Pre-Flight School developed a scientific method to fall asleep day or night, in any conditions, in under two minutes. After six weeks of practice, 96 percent of pilots could fall asleep in two minutes or less. Even after drinking coffee, with machine gunfire being played in the background.

Which means if you follow these steps, falling asleep will be a piece of cake."
from instapaper
15 days ago
Cleansing the Catholic Church of Its Sins
"When no form of sex is allowed, all forms of sex can seem equally immoral. And if your celibacy has ever slipped, you sure don’t want to snitch on someone else, do you?"
from instapaper
16 days ago
Cleansing the Catholic Church of Its Sins
"And then the kicker: the diocese was aware of Zirwas’s abuses as early as 1987. Zirwas continued in the priesthood until 1994, when he was placed on leave, citing “personal reasons.” Bishop, soon-to-be Cardinal Anthony J. Bevilacqua did nothing to punish or report this man for molesting countless children. Then he was actually re-appointed as a priest by Bishop Donald Wuerl, who is now a cardinal in my own archdiocese of Washington. When another complaint of abuse found its way to Wuerl, he removed Zirwas, who then moved to Florida, fled to Cuba, and was found strangled to death in Havana in 2001. Nonetheless Wuerl presided at Zirwas’s funeral and made some remarks: “According to the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, Wuerl described how Zirwas was a kind man, and had preached a message of salvation through faith in Jesus. ‘A priest is a priest,’ Wuerl said that day. ‘Once he is ordained, he’s a priest forever.’”"
from instapaper
16 days ago
The unbearable ugliness of the Catholic Church
"Four decades ago, Ireland was among the most homogeneously and fervently Catholic countries in the world. When Pope John Paul II visited in 1979, he was greeted by crowds of well over a million people. Last weekend, three months after the overwhelming passage of a referendum that repealed the pro-life provision of the Irish constitution, Pope Francis addressed a crowd roughly one-tenth the size."
from instapaper
17 days ago
Silence in the face of mystery
"Good liturgy is about silence. I don’t mean that good liturgy is all Quaker meeting, but that there’s something about liturgy that ought to be pressing us in that direction. In quite a lot of the church’s history, both Catholic and Protestant traditions have variously got this wrong. There’s been an urge to fill up the void, an anxiety about silence—whether it’s the urge to improve the occasion and go on teaching, making sure that people are getting the right ideas, or the urge to keep things happening with lots of ceremonial. Both often seem rather to miss the point; busy and cluttered talk, like busy and cluttered activity, just tells people that we’re busy and that we’re really rather anxious that they shouldn’t get things wrong. Making space, acting, moving, speaking in a way that makes space around it: that’s what liturgy needs to be."
from instapaper
21 days ago
Silence in the face of mystery
"But the more our humanity falls in love with this strange idea of domesticating, absorbing, and controlling, the less human we actually get. I would venture to guess that the people we would least like to spend a long time with are those who have answers to every question and plans for every contingency. There’s something slightly inhuman about that, because if we believe that our humanity is constantly growing, then there have got to be moments when we are taken beyond the familiar and the controllable. A growing humanity, a maturing humanity, is one that’s prepared for silence, because it’s prepared at important moments to say, “I can’t domesticate, I can’t get on top of this.”

God is that environment, that encounter, that we will never get to the bottom of and that we will never control. To understand that there’s something about silence that is profoundly at the heart of being human begins to open up a recognition: being Christian requires us more than ever to come to terms with those moments when silence is imposed on us, when we face what we can’t control."
from instapaper
21 days ago
Economics Needs Help From Sociology - Bloomberg
Now, Desmond is among the most brilliant and acclaimed scholars studying poverty in the U.S. He received a MacArthur Foundation “genius” grant in 2015, and his book “Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City” won the 2017 Pulitzer Prize for general non-fiction. He and Wilmers (who just got his Ph.D. from Harvard this year) won’t have any trouble getting media attention for their study when the time comes, and there’s no reason why they shouldn’t get to choose when that time is. But to somebody who has spent decades writing about economic research, the notion that researchers have completed a paper on a topic of economic interest — according to Wilmers’ website, it’s already been accepted for publication in the American Journal of Sociology — and I can’t get my hands on it is novel, and more than a little aggravating.
poverty  SSTT 
22 days ago
The risks of alcohol (again)
"Let’s consider one drink a day (10g, 1.25 UK units) compared to none, for which the authors estimated an extra 4 (918–914) in 100,000 people would experience a (serious) alcohol-related condition.

That means, to experience one extra problem, 25,000 people need to drink 10g alcohol a day for a year, that’s 3,650g a year each.

To put this in perspective, a standard 70cl bottle of gin contains 224 g of alcohol, so 3,650g a year is equivalent to around 16 bottles of gin per person. That’s a total of 400,000 bottles of gin among 25,000 people, being associated with one extra health problem. Which indicates a rather low level of harm in these occasional drinkers."
from instapaper
22 days ago
overcast.fm
Really appreciate the JJ Reddick view of insight and happiness and meta intelligence as we hear about w cowen
25 days ago
Of Wives and Widgets
"These feelings are based on a small (n=100) convenience sample, but Perry and Schleifer used a gold-standard survey dataset and found that the onset of porn usage doubles the odds of divorce over a two-year period. Men are more likely to begin viewing porn than woman but both genders are more likely to get divorced once they start doing so. Likewise, an informal survey of divorce lawyers finds over half of divorces in their experience involve porn and even more involve adultery. If women feel alienated from their relationships when their boyfriend or husband is having sex with a laptop and in fact divorce is more likely under these circumstances, it strains credulity to think she’ll like it any better when he wheels an android Astarte out of the closet every evening."
from instapaper
4 weeks ago
How a Think Tank Measures the Impact of Ideas
"It’s worth emphasizing again: Neither of these metrics is a direct measure of impact, let alone a perfect one. All such proxy metrics can be gamed or misunderstood, and each reveals only a partial dimension of the truth. And not all worthwhile proxy metrics can be used to compare competitors. For example, our scholars’ personal relationships and private briefings with policy makers and journalists are prime proxy metrics of impact, because the leaders’ time and attention is so scarce. But it is impossible to compare such proprietary data across organizations.

The point is not to search for one perfect proxy. Instead, nonprofits operating in the ideas industry can build a dashboard, outfit it with a wide variety of variables like these, and then use it to gauge the revealed preferences of public leaders and the uptake of the organization’s work."
from instapaper
4 weeks ago
going big, going small
"So, as needed, you get more local. You start with your classroom, or your personal blog (hi), or whatever is, as Heidegger might put it, zuhanden. One of my favorite scenes in Dickens’ Bleak House comes when the indefatigable Mrs. Pardiggle tries to enlist our heroine Esther Summerson in her “militant” evangelism among the poor — which is in truth not evangelism at all but rather relentless moral hectoring."
from instapaper
4 weeks ago
John Inazu: Why I’m Still Confident About ‘Confident Pluralism’
"Confident pluralism seeks to avoid chaos, which ignores our differences. It also cautions against control, which suppresses those differences we don’t like. We can choose to live between the extremes of chaos and control by insisting on legal protections that honor difference for all and practicing civility in our own relationships across difference. In doing so, we should not pretend that confident pluralism will lead to an idealized society. Any workable theory of democratic politics will have some degree of chaos and require some amount of control. Constitutional protections like associational rights allow our private groups to flourish, but they increase the risk of instability. Civic aspirations underlying our speech and actions give us norms that protect against chaos, but these same norms also introduce elements of social control."
from instapaper
4 weeks ago
Why the Left Is So Afraid of Jordan Peterson
"When even Barack Obama, the poet laureate of identity politics, is moved to issue a message to the faithful, hinting that that they could be tipping their hand on all of this—saying during a speech he delivered in South Africa that a culture is at a dead end when it decides someone has no “standing to speak” if he is a white man—and when even this mayday is ignored, the doomsday clock ticks ever closer to the end."
from instapaper
4 weeks ago
Why the Left Is So Afraid of Jordan Peterson
"The alarms sounded when Peterson published what quickly became a massive bestseller, 12 Rules for Life, because books are something that the left recognizes as drivers of culture."
from instapaper
4 weeks ago
Why the Left Is So Afraid of Jordan Peterson
"That might seem like a small thing, but it’s not. With identity politics off the table, it was possible to talk about all kinds of things—religion, philosophy, history, myth—in a different way. They could have a direct experience with ideas, not one mediated by ideology. All of these young people, without quite realizing it, were joining a huge group of American college students who were pursuing a parallel curriculum, right under the noses of the people who were delivering their official educations."
from instapaper
4 weeks ago
Opinion | The Podcast Bros Want to Optimize Your Life
"On the surface, this is the message of a new generation of wellness gurus, a network of podcasters centered in the Austin, Tex., area and Southern California. Yes, they are easy to mock, and their gospel of health, wealth and contentment comes with the usual moral hazards: Too much faith in self-improvement glosses over structural injustices that place real limits on what’s possible for many people.

But over the past few years the podcasters have become a significant cultural phenomenon, spiritual entrepreneurs who are filling the gap left as traditional religious organizations erode and modernity frays our face-to-face connections with communities and institutions."
from instapaper
5 weeks ago
Opinion | Oh, the Humanities!
"That problem is the one that Auden identified seventy years ago: In an Apollonian culture, eager for “Useful Knowledge” and technical mastery and increasingly indifferent to memory and allergic to tradition, the poet and the novelist and the theologian struggle to find an official justification for their arts. And both the turn toward radical politics and the turn toward high theory are attempts by humanists in the academy to supply that justification — to rebrand the humanities as the seat of social justice and a font of political reform, or to assume a pseudoscientific mantle that lets academics claim to be interrogating literature with the rigor and precision of a lab tech doing dissection.

At the moment both efforts look like failed attempts. But is there an alternative? Here I would dissent a little from the sternness of Jacobs’s pessimism, since I think the Christian humanists that he describes — and their secular and Jewish counterparts — had a little more short-run success than he suggests. There was real growth in humanities majors beginning in the 1950s (stronger among women than men, but present among both), and that indicator corresponded to a genuine mass interest, mediated by journalists and popularizers as well as academia, in pursuits that now seem esoteric and strictly elitist — poetry and public theology, classical music and abstract impressionism, the Great American novel and the high theory of French cinema and more."
from instapaper
5 weeks ago
How to use Grammarly in Ulysses
"So the workflow for this is:

create your article in Ulysses,
use the built-in spell check when it pops up and if you are finished with your draft,
open it on your iPhone and check the whole sheet with the Grammarly keyboard.
After this, your changes are also synchronized"
from instapaper
5 weeks ago
Why ‘Fred’ Is the Best Friend of Economics Writers
"Every economics writer’s best friend is named Fred. It stands for Federal Reserve Economic Data, and it’s maintained by the Fed bank in St. Louis. It allows you to use a single interface to pull, at last count, 509,000 different data series from 87 different sources of economic and financial data.

A big part of the advantage is simply that once you’re familiar with the interface, which is intuitive, you don’t have to relearn the data retrieval tool for each statistical agency every time. So, for example, I write about the European economy only now and again, so I have to relearn how to use the Eurostat database every time if the data isn’t in Fred. That’s not for the faint of heart."
from instapaper
5 weeks ago
Life is Short
"One heuristic for distinguishing stuff that matters is to ask yourself whether you'll care about it in the future. Fake stuff that matters usually has a sharp peak of seeming to matter. That's how it tricks you. The area under the curve is small, but its shape jabs into your consciousness like a pin."
from instapaper
5 weeks ago
Life is Short
"Cultivate a habit of impatience about the things you most want to do. Don't wait before climbing that mountain or writing that book or visiting your mother. You don't need to be constantly reminding yourself why you shouldn't wait. Just don't wait."
from instapaper
5 weeks ago
Blackstone's Byron Wien Discusses Lessons Learned in His First 80 Years
"Every year try doing something you have never done before that is totally out of your comfort zone"
from instapaper
5 weeks ago
Blackstone's Byron Wien Discusses Lessons Learned in His First 80 Years
"Don’t try to be better than your competitors, try to be different. There is always going to be someone smarter than you, but there may not be someone who is more imaginative."
from instapaper
5 weeks ago
Blackstone's Byron Wien Discusses Lessons Learned in His First 80 Years
"Younger people are naturally insecure and tend to overplay their accomplishments. Most people don’t become comfortable with who they are until they’re in their 40’s. By that time they can underplay their achievements and become a nicer, more likeable person. Try to get to that point as soon as you can."
from instapaper
5 weeks ago
Blackstone's Byron Wien Discusses Lessons Learned in His First 80 Years
"On philanthropy my approach is to try to relieve pain rather than spread joy. Music, theatre and art museums have many affluent supporters, give the best parties and can add to your social luster in a community. They don’t need you. Social service, hospitals and educational institutions can make the world a better place and help the disadvantaged make their way toward the American dream."
from instapaper
5 weeks ago
Blackstone's Byron Wien Discusses Lessons Learned in His First 80 Years
"When meeting someone new, try to find out what formative experience occurred in their lives before they were seventeen. It is my belief that some important event in everyone’s youth has an influence on everything that occurs afterwards."
from instapaper
5 weeks ago
Blackstone's Byron Wien Discusses Lessons Learned in His First 80 Years
"Have a point of view before you start a book or article and see if what you think is confirmed or refuted by the author"
from instapaper
5 weeks ago
Blackstone's Byron Wien Discusses Lessons Learned in His First 80 Years
"Write op-eds and thought pieces for major publications. Organize discussion groups to bring your thoughtful friends together."
from instapaper
5 weeks ago
Blackstone's Byron Wien Discusses Lessons Learned in His First 80 Years
"Concentrate on finding a big idea that will make an impact on the people you want to influence. The Ten Surprises, which I started doing in 1986, has been a defining product. People all over the world are aware of it and identify me with it. What they seem to like about it is that I put myself at risk by going on record with these events which I believe are probable and hold myself accountable at year-end. If you want to be successful and live a long, stimulating life, keep yourself at risk intellectually all the time"
from instapaper
5 weeks ago
Maria Konnikova Shows Her Cards
"If poker is an analog to real life, does it help or hurt to be a woman?

Obviously, the first thing people notice about me is my gender. And people stereotype.

When you see someone looking a certain way, you assume they play a certain way. So once I figure out how they view women, I can figure out how to play against them. They’re not seeing me as a poker player, they’re seeing me as a female poker player.

There are people who’d rather die than be bluffed by a woman. They’ll never fold to me because that’s an affront to their masculinity.

I never bluff them. I know that no matter how strong my hand, they are still going to call me because they just can’t fold to a girl.

Other people think women are incapable of bluffing. They think if I’m betting really aggressively, it means I have an incredibly strong hand. I bluff those people all the time.

There are people who think that women shouldn’t be at a poker table, and they try to bully me. So, what do I do? I let them. And I wait to be in a good position so that I can take their chips. Just like life, right?"
from instapaper
5 weeks ago
Life and Death at the T.J. Maxx by Anna Anderson
"made a break for it one night, kicked my way up to the surface, determined to “reach out” as they say, which is an action ten times harder to perform than it sounds. I needed to tell someone I was sinking, and that I seemed to be losing the will to swim. I needed to tell someone how bad it had gotten. I needed to tell someone even if it was just to have someone hear it. Even if it was just to hear the words come out of my mouth.

I sat in my car in the parking lot of a grocery store and called my friend. I began by asking how she was and listened to her response with an ache in my chest. The ache was the longing to live where she was living – above the surface. And then the moment came. She asked me how I was. I opened my mouth to let it all out. Or to at least say something about the trouble I was in. But just as soon as I opened my mouth, an undertow ripped me away and plunged me back into the deep. All I could get out was, “I’m doing okay. Good to hear your voice.” I hung up the phone and found myself reaching my toes down again. Nothing."
from instapaper
5 weeks ago
A brief addendum to the previous post: It goes a long way towards explaining wh... —Snakes and Ladders “A brief addendum to the previous post: It goes a long way towards explaining why in my writing I so often try to resurrect abandoned metaphors and
Difference is valuable in itself because of a phenomenon that has never been described better than Kenneth Burke described it decades ago in his great essay on “Terministic Screens”: every vocabulary brings certain aspects of reality into clear view while simultaneously screening out others.
diversity  language 
5 weeks ago
excerpts from my Sent folder: on exhausted languages —Snakes and Ladders “What I really am, by vocation and avocation, is a historian of ideas, and when you’ve been a historian of ideas for several decades you’re bound to notice how a certain voca
Anyway, when you do this kind of work you develop — or you damn well ought to develop — an awareness that many of our vocabularies are evanescent because of their highly limited explanatory power. You see, in a given discipline or topic area, one vocabulary coming on as another fades away, and you don’t expect the new one to last any longer than the previous one did. I think this makes it easier for you to consider the possibility that a whole explanatory language is basically useless. But while those languages last people get profoundly attached to them and are simply unwilling to question them — they become axioms for their users — which means that conversations cease to be conversations but rather turn into endlessly iterated restatements of quasi-religious conviction. “Intersecting monologues,” as Rebecca West said.

Often when I’m grading essays, or talking to my students about their essays, I notice that a certain set of terms are functioning axiomatically for them in ways that impede actual thought. When that happens I will sometimes ask, “How would you describe your position if you couldn’t use that word?” And I try to force the same discipline on myself on those occasions (too rare of course) when I realize that I am allowing a certain set of terms to become an intellectual crutch.
teaching  language 
5 weeks ago
Q&A: Dr. David Katz of Yale University’s Prevention Research Center – Boston Magazine
"You’ve said, “What we know about the fundamentals of healthful eating is as decisive as it is dull.” Meanwhile, we keep searching for the perfect diet. What’s the answer to the big “what should we be eating” question?

The “what” is easy. Michael Pollan nailed it. Eat food, not too much, mostly plants. Even if we have doubts about whether a mostly plant diet is better than a more mixed diet or a Paleo style diet, it’s moot because there are 7 billion of us on the planet. We cannot be 7 billion hunter gatherers. The land cost and environmental cost of eating animals, the ethical cost of raising animals, everything argues in favor of a mostly plant based diet."
from instapaper
5 weeks ago
The Differentiated University: Better Serving the Diverse Needs of Tomorrow's Students
A nice model to think about the different ways to think about college students and how to engage them differently
university  Segmentation 
5 weeks ago
Twitter
My own description of the book might be “sobering.” I deeply admire the figures I wrote about, and find them brilli…
from twitter_favs
6 weeks ago
Cass Sunstein: How I Write
"The habit I’ve developed is to write in any free half hour I might find."
writing  scheduling  pomodoro  from instapaper
7 weeks ago
Cass Sunstein: How I Write
"Most days I’ll mostly write from 9:30 until noon. There’ll be stops and starts, and I’ll typically go from one project to another, depending on how they’re going. At the moment I’m working on an article in the general area of behavioral economics and public policy. I’m also working on a magazine piece, on a very different issue. I like to go back and forth—if I’m stuck on one, I’ll jump to the other. I’m also working on my next book, which has nothing to do with my current one. I’ll turn to that if I feel something’s brewing there. Most mornings I’ll spend time on two or three different writing projects."
writing  scheduling  from instapaper
7 weeks ago
Investment Pace —AVC “We were hanging out with friends last night and one of them asked me how many investments I have made this year. I replied “one so far.””
When you are making early-stage investments, which require a lot of your personal involvement over a seven to ten year period, you can only take on so many projects.

If you assume the average hold period for an early stage investment is seven years and if you make one to two investments per year, you will have between seven and fourteen portfolio companies to manage at any one time.

The low end of that range is quite manageable. The high end of that range is not. I have been there.

I believe that early stage venture capital done right is a service business in which the entrepreneur and the company they started is our customer.
advising  venture 
7 weeks ago
Balding Out
"A friend of mine in China who is a Christian missionary, told me a story about a time he was invited to speak at the local English corner they had in the apartment development where locals would get together hopefully with foreigners and practice English. He was asked to speak on what is the meaning of life, perfect for a part time missionary. He said he knew what people would say having lived in China for sometime but even so was stunned at how deeply and rigidly held the belief that making money was the entire meaning of life. There was no value system. There was no exogenously held right or wrong, only whether you made money. With apologies to a bastardized Dostoevsky, with money as God, all is permissible."
from instapaper
8 weeks ago
Kareem Abdul-Jabbar: Hollywood's New "Zero Tolerance" on Offensive Speech Makes Zero Sense
"We must not let these discordant sounds distract us from the deeper injustices. Companies quick to fire seem more interested in promoting a memorial to their virtue than attacking the systemic problems that would address putting more people of color, women and LGBTQ people behind the camera and in executive positions. In the 1,100 top films from 2007 to 2017, only 4 percent of the directors were female. And even if women do direct a successful film, they are rarely hired to direct another of the same level. Over the same span, only 5.2 percent of the 1,223 directors were black, and 3.2 percent were Asian."
from instapaper
8 weeks ago
Opinion | How to Get America on the Mediterranean Diet
"The landmark analysis of the eating patterns of an isolated Greek population strongly suggested that a calorie-limited diet high in fresh fruits and vegetables, whole grains, and olive oil and low in animal protein, particularly red meat, could lower the risk of heart attacks and strokes, decrease chronic disease and extend life.

Medical research over the last half-century has largely borne out this initial finding. Weight-loss fads and eating trends come and go, but the so-called Mediterranean diet has stood fast. “Among all diets,” Dr. Walter Willett of Harvard’s T.H. Chan School of Public Health concluded in an email, “the traditional Mediterranean diet is most strongly supported for delivering long term health and wellbeing.”"
from instapaper
8 weeks ago
the blog garden
"A well-thought-out tagging system on a single blog creates chains of associated ideas, with the logic of association governed by a single mind (or in the case of a group blog, a set of intentionally connected minds). And such chains are powerful generators of intellectual and aesthetic value."
from instapaper
8 weeks ago
City Street Orientations around the World - Geoff Boeing
By popular request, this is a quick follow-up to this post comparing the orientation of streets in 25 US cities using Python and OSMnx. Here are 25 more cities around the world:
cities  data  python 
8 weeks ago
Nike Says Its $250 Running Shoes Will Make You Run Much Faster. What if That’s Actually True? - The New York Times
Using public race reports and shoe records from Strava, a fitness app that calls itself the social network for athletes, The Times found that runners in Vaporflys ran 3 to 4 percent faster than similar runners wearing other shoes, and more than 1 percent faster than the next-fastest racing shoe.

We found that the difference was not explained by faster runners choosing to wear the shoes, by runners choosing to wear them in easier races or by runners switching to Vaporflys after running more training miles. Instead, the analysis suggests that, in a race between two marathoners of the same ability, a runner wearing Vaporflys would have a real advantage over a competitor not wearing them.
running  shoes 
8 weeks ago
What we buy can be used to predict our politics, race or education — sometimes with more than 90 percent accuracy - The Washington Post
By a relatively large margin, the view that best predicted being white in 2016 was “approve of police striking citizens.” In previous decades, the best indicator of whiteness was saying that the government was spending the right amount (or too much) on improving the condition of black residents.
race  Politics  data 
8 weeks ago
American Political-Party Affiliation as a Predictor of Usage of an Adultery Website | SpringerLink
Linking an August 2015 leak of user data from Ashley Madison to 2012 voter registration rolls from five U.S. states, we found 80,000 matches between 200,000 Ashley Madison user accounts and 50 million voters. According to simple rates in the sample, and also to predictively validated regression models controlling for state, gender, and age, we found that Democrats were least likely to use Ashley Madison, Libertarians were most likely, and Republicans, Greens, and unaffiliated voters were in between. Our results provide support for theories arguing that people with stricter sexual attitudes are paradoxically more likely to engage in deviant sexual behavior.
sexuality  Politics 
8 weeks ago
Opinion | The Quiet Death of Racial Progress
"That is to say, the left-wingers have it correct when they point to the systems of oppression that pervade society: the legacy of residential segregation; the racist attitudes in the workplace that demonstrably make it much harder for African-American men to get jobs; the prejudices — in the schools, in the streets and in the judicial system — that make it much more likely that African-American males will be punished, incarcerated and marginalized.

But conservatives are right to point to the importance of bourgeois norms. Three institutions do an impressive job of reducing racial disparity: the military, marriage and church. As the A.E.I. study shows, black men who served in the military are more likely to be in the middle class than those who did not. Black men who attended religious services are 76 percent more likely to attain at least middle-class status than those who did not. As Chetty’s research shows, the general presence of fathers — not just one’s own — in the community is a powerful determinant of whether young men will be able to rise and thrive."
from instapaper
9 weeks ago
Jack Ma: How to be successful in your 20s, 30s, 40s and beyond
When Alibaba founder and CEO Jack Ma was a young adult, he applied to over 30 jobs and got rejected by all of them. Today, the 53-year-old's e-commerce company is valued at $519 billion, although Ma didn't start achieving career success until his 30s.

"In life, it's not how much we achieved, it's how much we've gone through the tough days and mistakes," Ma recently said to a group of young leaders invited to the World Economic Forum annual meeting in Davos, Switzerland. "If you want to be successful, learn from the other people's mistakes, don't learn from the successful stories."

As an alum of the Young Global Leaders network, Ma shed light on what the room of young adults should focus on within the next 30 years.


"When you are 20 to 30 years old, you should follow a good boss [and] join a good company to learn how to do things properly," Ma said.

"When you are 30 to 40 years old, if you want to do something yourself, just do it. You still can afford to lose, to fail," he added.

Soon thereafter, though, Ma recommended that people start prioritizing stability, family and the future generations.

Instead of diving into a new field or subject toward the later years in your career, he said, "when you're 4
career 
10 weeks ago
the Ministry of Amnesia
"So why is that? Why, though certainly there is some anger at the global-capitalist system, is there, relative to reasonable expectations, so little? Why don’t people care that, since the massively reckless incompetencies of 2008, almost nothing has changed? (Lanchester documents the insignificant of the changes very thoroughly.)

The first answer is that almost nobody — almost nobody — remembers what happened in 2008. And why don’t they remember? Because of social media and smartphones.

I cannot, of course, provide documentary proof for that claim. But as the Marxists used to say I believe it is no accident that the shaking of the foundations of the global economy and “the longest period of declining real incomes in recorded economic history” happened just as the iPhone was taking serious hold on the imagination of the developed world, and Facebook and Twitter were becoming key components of everyday life in that world. On your smartphones you can get (a) a stream of prompts for visceral wrath and fear and then (b) games and distractions that accomplish the suddenly-necessary self-soothing. Between the wrath and fear and the subsequent soothing, who can remember what happened last week, much less ten years ago? Silicon Valley serves the global capitalist order as its Ministry of Amnesia. “What is it I was so concerned about?”"
from instapaper
10 weeks ago
Tech Vs. 300 million cows. Can India’s sprawling ag industry be tamed by a startup?
A good piece focusing on the start of opportunity in emerging markets, and the challenges of seeing investment potential
VC  venture  emergingmarkets 
10 weeks ago
On Passion and Its Discontents - Study Hacks - Cal Newport
"“While ‘find your passion’ is well-intended advice, it might not be good advice.

A new study by Stanford psychologists examines the hidden implications of the advice to ‘find your passion.’

Mantras like ‘find your passion’ carry hidden implications…they imply that once an interest resonates, pursuing it will be easy. But, the research found that when people encounter inevitable challenges, that mindset makes it more likely people will surrender their newfound interest.
And the idea that passions are found fully formed implies that the number of interests a person has is limited. That can cause people to narrow their focus and neglect other areas.”"
from instapaper
11 weeks ago
Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez on her Catholic faith and the urgency of a criminal justice reform
"Solutions are already beginning to take shape, which include unraveling the War on Drugs, reconsidering mandatory minimum sentencing and embracing a growing private prison abolition movement that urges us to reconsider the levels at which the United States pursues mass incarceration. No matter where these proposals take us, we should pursue such conversations with an openness to change and an aim to rehabilitate our brothers and sisters wherever possible and wherever necessary. By nature, a society that forgives and rehabilitates its people is a society that forgives and transforms itself. That takes a radical kind of love, a secret of which is given in the Lord’s Prayer: Forgive us our trespasses, as we forgive those who trespass against us."
from instapaper
11 weeks ago
« earlier      
222 331 395 academia academics advertising advice advising africa aging ai anxiety app apple art artist arttickyoulations audi authenticity automationessay balance baltimore beauty bias bible biking blog book books bookx brand business capitalism career case cca change china choice christianity cities cocktails coding coffee comedy communication community competition confidence conservatism conservative consulting creativity csr culture cura data dating decision decisions design development diet discipline doubt douthat drink eating economic economics economy education efficiency ehr emerson emotion entrepreneur entrepreneurship essay ethics exed existential exlearn facebook failure faith family fashion film finance fitness food friendship gender ggplot girls goals google government gr graduation graphic graphics growth habit happiness hbr hdb health healthcare history home hope hopesa house hr humor identity immigration individualism industry inequality innovation interview investing ipo itfbook itn jobs jobsact justice lab language leadership learn learning liberal liberalism life lmt location london love management markdown market marketing marriage maturity mckinsey medeasel medicare meditation memory method methods millennial mindfullness mktstrat mobile moderate moral morality motivation movies music negotiation netflix network news novel nutrition obama ocw omnifocus operations organization parenting paris paul perception personal personality personhood perspectives philosophy photography pige poetry policy politics poverty power productivity progress psychology quantitative r race read reading recipes relationship relationships religion research review rhodes risk rstudio running scheduling science scripture segmentation self sex sexuality shoes simon social socialmedia sociology sorority southafrica spirituality sports startup stats story strategy structure stryker summerfunding tax taylor teaching team technology television testing theology therapy thiel tiff tobuy tolisten toread towatch travel trump tv uber umich university urban utopia value values vc venture video violence virtue virtues visual visualization vocation wdi wire wisdom work workflow writing youth

Copy this bookmark:



description:


tags: