2130
Five Things Betsy Rosenblatt Said
As part of our participation in Copyright Week, this month's Five Things post with OTW Legal Chair Betsy Rosenblatt discusses whether or not a fair use utopia could exist and how her entire life has become a little bit fannish: https://goo.gl/twTxho
Five-Things  Legal-Advocacy  Legal-Committee  Volunteering 
yesterday
Artifact Storage Room 3 is Moving to the AO3
Artifact Storage Room 3, a Sentinel fanfiction and fanart archive, is being imported to AO3. Learn more about the import, including how to claim your works, here
Open-Doors-Committee  Fanfiction  Fan-art  Television 
3 days ago
Fanhackers • The history of the Star Trek fandom has been...
"The history of the Star Trek fandom has been largely defined by its instances of fan mobilization...." “The history of the Star Trek fandom has been largely defined by its instances of fan mobilization. While the fandom can be said to have come into existence in 1966 with the premier of the first episode of Star Trek, the fandom arguably only truly came into its own when the series was cancelled. As previously discussed, when the original Star Trek series was cancelled in 1968, fans of the series mobilized around a letter writing campaign and “pressure[d] NBC to keep and later return their show to the airways” (Jenkins, as cited by Scardaville, 2005, p.882). Although the show‟s revival lasted only one season, the event marked a turning point for both the Star Trek fandom and for fandoms in general: the success of the letter writing campaign showed that fans can and do have an influence over the decisions producers make – that the power relations between fans and producers are not entirely unilateral. If not the first instance, the letter writing campaign has certainly been the most well documented instance of successful fan mobilization in the history of modern fandoms, and has been the standard for many subsequent fan mobilizations.”

- Devin Beauregard, Cultural Policy in the Digital Age: The Emergence of Fans as Political Agents in Copyright Discourse, p91
fanhackers 
3 days ago
This Week in Fandom, Volume 72
This Week in Fandom: AU text fic BTSoutcast goes viral on Twitter; fans criticize NBC’s Rise for straightwashing its main character; Counterfind bot continues to block Outlander fan pages on social media; the historical origins of shipping; and more!
This_Week_in_Fandom  Entertainment-Industries  Fanfiction  Fannish-communities  Fannish-Histories  Gender-and-Sexuality  Intellectual-Property  Music  Television 
4 days ago
International Fanworks Day 2018 Is Coming
Are you excited about next month’s International Fanworks Day? Share your thoughts about your love for fanworks between now and January 31 with #WhatFanworksMeantoMe and we may signal boost you! For more info on how to take part, check this out: https://goo.gl/hMcr3M
Communications-Committee  Event  Announcement  Fannish-Practices 
5 days ago
Fanhackers • The task of archiving was once entrusted only to...
"The task of archiving was once entrusted only to museums, libraries, and other institutions that..." “

The task of archiving was once entrusted only to museums, libraries, and other institutions that acted as repositories of culture in material form. But with the rise of digital networked media, a multitude of self-designated archivists—fans, pirates, hackers—have become practitioners of cultural preservation on the Internet. These nonprofessional archivists have democratized cultural memory, building freely accessible online archives of whatever content they consider suitable for digital preservation. In Rogue Archives, Abigail De Kosnik examines the practice of archiving in the transition from print to digital media, looking in particular at Internet fan fiction archives. 

De Kosnik explains that media users today regard all of mass culture as an archive, from which they can redeploy content for their own creations. Hence, “remix culture” and fan fiction are core genres of digital cultural production.



- Rogue Archives: Digital Cultural Memory and Media Fandom | Abigail de Kosnik
fanhackers 
6 days ago
The OTW is Recruiting Tag Wranglers, Plus Communications and Translation Staff
Do you like organizing and working in teams? Or do you have an interest in new media and networking? The Organization for Transformative Works is recruiting for Tag Wranglers, Volunteer Managers and Media Outreach personnel! Learn more and apply here.
Volunteering  Communications-Committee  Translation-Committee  Tag-Wrangling-Committee 
10 days ago
This Week in Fandom, Volume 71
This Week in Fandom: Restrictive content guidelines for Marvel's Create Your Own; USS Callister and fan culture; fans grieve the death of K-Pop star Jonghyun; Neil Gaiman on fanfiction filling in the gaps of canon; and more!
Books  Comics  Commercialization-of-Fans  Fandoms  Fanfiction  Fannish-communities  Intellectual-Property  Music 
11 days ago
Fanhackers • Lecture 3: Early Fan Studies | Lori Morimoto on...
Lecture 3: Early Fan Studies | Lori Morimoto on Patreon Lecture 3: Early Fan Studies | Lori Morimoto on Patreon:

Check out this free Fan Studies lecture on early fan studies by Lori Morimoto! It’s a great overview of some of the works that started fan studies as a discipline. It also puts them in a contemporary context, sketching out how fandom and approaches to studying it have changed since.
fanhackers 
11 days ago
Fanhackers • Unlike larger [K-pop] groups with official...
"Unlike larger [K-pop] groups with official Japanese fan clubs, Shin-Okubo idol groups usually..." “Unlike larger [K-pop] groups with official Japanese fan clubs, Shin-Okubo idol groups usually operate on a point card system. Attending each concert usually equals one point (though there are double point days), and purchasing certain merchandise (such as towels or penlights/fanlights) earns extra points. Bringing along a friend for their first concert also earns an extra point, which cultivates fan labor. As the points accumulate various benefits are awarded, often culminating with a rare option like the 5 minute date [with an idol] (say, after 50 points).”

-

‘Benefits’ and Labor – K-pop Fandom in Tokyo Beyond the Major Groups | Miranda Larsen

Part of a longer series about K-pop fandom that’s very much worth checking out.
fanhackers 
12 days ago
Changes to the Star Wars Fandom Tags on AO3
In order to keep the servers from crying, we’re going to be streamlining some of this tree so the fandom tags for individual pieces of series will be merged with the other parts of their storyline, as other fandoms on the archive do. The first step in this process is going to be folding the individual saga movie tags into their respective trilogy meta tags (i.e., Star Wars Prequel Trilogy, Star Wars Original Trilogy, Star Wars Sequel Trilogy).

You can also use the Additional Tags field if you want to highlight an individual film in your work. We have canonicals for all eight already (for example, Movie: Star Wars: Attack of the Clones.)
Archive-of-Our-Own  Tag-Wrangling-Committee  Movies 
16 days ago
TER/MA is Moving to the AO3
TER/MA, an archive for X-Files slash fanfiction focused on Mulder/Krycek, is being imported to AO3! Find out more about the import--including how to claim your works--here.
Open-Doors-Committee  Fanfiction 
18 days ago
Fanhackers • Serialized stories encourage discussion and...
"Serialized stories encourage discussion and analysis. There is plenty of evidence of Victorian..." “Serialized stories encourage discussion and analysis. There is plenty of evidence of Victorian “reading groups,” where friends and families would come together to read aloud the latest installments of a favorite tale, and of book exchanges, where a single pamphlet would make it round an entire community. This impulse to share and discuss parallels the way a new chapter of a popular fic will be consumed and dissected by its readers on platforms like Tumblr.”

- @carolinecrampton on the history of serialized fiction and today’s fic WIPs (via fansplaining)
fanhackers 
18 days ago
The OTW’s 2016 Annual Report is Now Available
The OTW's 2016 Annual Report is now publicly available. It contains information on our activities & finances during the previous fiscal and calendar year. Read it here!
Report  OTW-Sections 
20 days ago
Fanhackers • While they received a lot of hostility and hate...
"While they received a lot of hostility and hate posts, the Brony audience did not respond to the..." “While they received a lot of hostility and hate posts, the Brony audience did not respond to the trolls in kind.  As with many internet groups, the Brony audience used catchphrases and memes such as “welcome to the herd” or “confound those ponies” to express their adherence to the audience and develop its culture. And during the ‘pony wars’ one meme in particular exploded in popularity and usage: “love and tolerate” (Fig 3.). Memes are an important part of an internet group as “they come to us framed by specific histories of use and meaning, and are products of specific ideological struggles,” [17] so the use of this particular meme as the Bronies’ main weapon and response to their ‘haters’ reveals how this audience was developing and creating its own identity during this time of tension and conflict.”

- A brief history of the 4chan ‘pony wars’, Claire Burdfield
fanhackers 
25 days ago
Fanhackers • While role-play does offer therapeutic benefits,...
"While role-play does offer therapeutic benefits, the recent actions of Tumblr users show fans of..." “While role-play does offer therapeutic benefits, the recent actions of Tumblr users show fans of certain narratives moving beyond the need to improve one’s own relation to the world. Rather than the world serving the individual, the individual in these cases serves the world by allowing her– or himself to be swept up in play. A major part of this transindividual work is the acknowledgment that world building and narrative is an unpredictable activity: role players do not control their muses or seek to do so. In celebrating this loss of control, the player also opens him– or herself up to other players’ needs and strengths while navigating a scene.”

-

Howard, K. Shannon. 2017. “Surrendering Authorial Agency and Practicing Transindividualism in Tumblr’s Role-play Communities.” Transformative Works and Cultures, no. 25.

In this paper, Shannon Howard examines role-play on Tumblr as a hybrid between fan fiction and gaming. She compares it to other kinds of role-play, for instance tabletop and live action gaming, video games, or even online role-play on platforms like LiveJournal. She argues that Tumblr role-play is different, in part because of the technical features Tumblr offers as a platform. On LiveJournal, for instance, a user is in complete control of the interactions that happen on their account: they make posts, they pick or design the journal style, they may choose to engage with comments, but equally they may also delete comments. Tumblr’s features allow for a more porous relationship between accounts, players, and characters as interactions may be reblogged and added to, and no single individual is in complete control of the process. Howeard uses the framework of transindividualism to argue that Tumblr role-play is significantly different to other kinds of role-play as it is much less focused on the individual and more focused on the collaborative creatiion of a narrative.
fanhackers 
4 weeks ago
Fanhackers • Currently, the structure of fansubbing...
"Currently, the structure of fansubbing distribution is highly decentralized and  difficult  to..." “Currently, the structure of fansubbing distribution is highly decentralized and  difficult  to  coordinate.  In  peer-to-peer  file  sharing,  there  are  no  central organizations  but  rather  multiple  –  very  transient  –  global  networks  among individual file sharers. With such a structure, it might be hard for fansubbers and their users to reach a new consensus on their ethics: many fansubbers even feel that the field is too decentralized and globalized to be called a ‘commu-
nity’.”

-  Lee, Hye-Kyung. 2011. “Cultural Consumer and Copyright: A Case Study of Anime Fansubbing.” Creative Industries Journal 3 (3):237–252.  
fanhackers 
4 weeks ago
This Week in Fandom, Volume 70
This Week in Fandom: Artificial intelligence generates a Harry Potter fanfic; what the Disney-Fox deal might mean for fandom; fanfiction, stigma, and female fans; and more!
This_Week_in_Fandom  Entertainment-Industries  Fanfiction  Fannish-communities  Gender-and-Sexuality  Movies 
4 weeks ago
All Things Rat is Moving to the AO3
All Things Rat, a fanfiction archive for works about X-Files character Alex Krycek, is being imported to AO3! Learn more about the import--including how to claim your works--here
Open-Doors-Committee  Fanfiction 
4 weeks ago
OTW Guest Post: TyphoidMeri
December's OTW Guest Post author, fan artist/crafter TyphoidMeri, talks about developing a belief in herself & how fandom has helped her.
Guest-Post  Fannish-Practices  Fanfiction  Fanart  Fan-Crafts 
4 weeks ago
Five Things Mandy Gooch Said
In Five Things, Mandy Gooch shares how volunteering for the OTW has helped her open up in groups & why January's exciting https://goo.gl/qjgvUE
Five-Things  Strategic-Planning 
5 weeks ago
This Week in Fandom, Volume 69
This Week in Fandom: Fans are upset by a statement from J.K. Rowling; fans are happy about a new development on Brooklyn Nine-Nine; fanfiction as a supplement to sex ed; 2017 year in review roundups; and more!
This_Week_in_Fandom  Books  Movies  Television  Gender-and-Sexuality  Entertainment-Industries 
5 weeks ago
Fanhackers • The provision of “official” GIFs also demonstrates...
"The provision of “official” GIFs also demonstrates that controlling what is provided and how it is..." “

The provision of “official” GIFs also demonstrates that controlling what is provided and how it is accessed is a key concern for many media rights holders. This control extends to developing specific settings for GIF engagement. Content providers like Disney and Viacom have launched their own branded keyboards in addition to hosting their own GIF channels on Giphy. Smartphone apps like the RuPaul’s Drag Race Keyboard App offer GIFs (and custom emoji) specific to a particular show. Snaps, the developer of the Drag Race app, has also produced similar commercial keyboards for shows including Mr. Robot, Portlandia, and Broad City. According to Snaps executive Austin Bone, these keyboards are a way for media properties to “empower” their fans (…).

Such “empowerment” is a lucrative endeavor. On top of inserting branded content into private conversations—an arguable advertising success in its own right—a keyboard app provides brands with valuable metrics, including realtime tracking of how many conversations are happening using the app, what content is being used the most frequently within those conversations, and by whom. These keyboards help brands achieve the holy grail of branded advertising: a multi-layered commodification of affect on the most intimate level.



- Miltner, K. M., & Highfield, T. (2017). Never Gonna GIF You Up: Analyzing the Cultural Significance of the Animated GIF. Social Media Society, 3(3), 1-11.
fanhackers 
5 weeks ago
November 2017 Newsletter, Volume 119
Check out the OTW's November newsletter for updates on #AO3's spam issue, our legal advocacy work, a new way to support the OTW via Humble Bundles, and more! Read it here.
Newsletter  OTW-Sections 
6 weeks ago
Fanhackers • Fan Studies Network Australasia Inaugural...
Fan Studies Network Australasia Inaugural Conference 2017 (with images, tweets) · bertha_c Fan Studies Network Australasia Inaugural Conference 2017 (with images, tweets) · bertha_c:

Check out this great storify of tweets from the first Fan Studies Network conference in Australia. The full program of fan studies goodness is here.
fanhackers 
6 weeks ago
International Volunteer Day 2017
Join OTW in celebrating International Volunteer Day by thanking those who have made us possible, and finding out more about them: https://goo.gl/f8mJgP
Event  Volunteering  Volunteers-&-Recruiting 
6 weeks ago
InDeath.net Fan Fiction is Moving to the AO3
InDeath.net Fanfiction, an In Death fanfiction archive, is being imported to AO3. Learn more about the import--including how to claim your works--here.
Open-Doors-Committee  Fanfiction 
6 weeks ago
Fanhackers • Freedom is a slippery concept, especially when it...
"Freedom is a slippery concept, especially when it comes to digital media. When we think about..." “Freedom is a slippery concept, especially when it comes to digital media. When we think about questions of copyright and digital ownership through cultural theft, freedom from domination lines up with freedom from having to pay—at least on the surface. Theft, piracy, and the commons are all concerned with getting things for free, and current configurations of online media and culture are hospitable to their insurrectionary modes of ownership.”

- Lothian, Alexis. Living in a Den of Thieves: Fan Video and Digital Challenges to Ownership. Cinema Journal 48.4, Summer 2009. 130-136.
fanhackers 
6 weeks ago
Are You Concerned About Net Neutrality?
Are you concerned about net neutrality? OTW Legal explains the issue, what it could mean for fans, and how you can get involved. Take action this December 2017 while the issue is still being debated!
Legal-Advocacy  Technology  Activism 
7 weeks ago
Fanhackers • fffinnagain: Lost Works and Posting Rates on...
fffinnagain:
Lost Works and Posting Rates on fanfiction.net and...
fffinnagain:

Lost Works and Posting Rates on fanfiction.net and Archive of Our Own

Recently, I posted an analysis of these two large fanfiction archives using work numbers (nodes) to get a sense of how active they have been over the years. Investigations since I’ve discovered how different these node counts are from the works CURRENTLY available in these archives.

In Red and Green above are the number of nodes assigned per month in each archive, going back to 2001 for Fanfiction.net and to AO3’s beginning in 2009. These nodes are assigned to each new work, or (on AO3) each new saved draft on the archive. The Blue and Yellow are estimates of the works currently in each archive from these past times, hence, works surviving.

Not only is the gap between Nodes and Surviving Works very big, it is shaped totally different for these two archives. To see this directly, here is the percentage of nodes with works currently in the archives, by month.

If we are going to compare fan activity on these archives from these data, Nodes and Current works, we need to get a better sense of what is going on. Below I get into the details of where these numbers come from, their historical context, and justify my interpretations, but here are the main points fanfiction readers might want to know:

Fanfiction.net has lost a lot of posted works over the years, up to 70% of those posted before 2003.

The proportion of works removed from fanfiction.net has gone down to ~20% since 2016

While some loss of works is to be expected, this amount of works removed over time suggests active curation by the FFN community and staff.

On AO3, the proportion works removed, or drafted but never posted is probably around 20%.

AO3 has a spam problem, with non-fan agents flooding the archives with fake works.

AO3 outpaced FFN in terms of works being posted to these archives in 2015 (as suggested in previous analysis) in the middle of messy part of the plot at the top.

In 2019, AO3 could reach FFN’s past peak posting rate of ~3500 fanworks per day.

So where are all the fanworks? 

Did they disapeare or did they never exist in the first place?

Find out under the read more, where I also explain these numbers, how I reached these conclusions, and some historical explanations for the changes over time.

I’ll also try to add corrections there, if new information comes to light.

Keep reading
fanhackers 
7 weeks ago
This Week in Fandom, Volume 68
This week in fandom: Vanity Fair photographs Marvel superheroes, how a DMCA takedown request affected a Canadian mashup website, fans visit their favourite fictional world in an upcoming book, and more.
Books  Comics  DMCA  Intellectual-Property  Music  Remix  This_Week_in_Fandom 
7 weeks ago
Fanhackers • These questions give us the opportunity to rethink...
"These questions give us the opportunity to rethink how we understand the emergence and spread of..." “These questions give us the opportunity to rethink how we understand the emergence and spread of distinctive cultural forms as something other than a game of “follow the money.” Instead, we need to follow the activity, the energy, the commitment of those who care, starting with what is most meaningful to them. Anime is instructive because it reveals the centrality of a kind of social energy that emerges in the space between people and media. For me, the soul of anime does not point to some ultimate, internal essence of the media as an object. Rather, the soul of anime points to this social energy that arises from our collective engagements through media, and as such, it gives us an alternative way to think about what is of value in media.”
- Condry, Ian. The soul of anime: collaborative creativity and Japan’s media success story. Durham, N.C.: Duke Univ. Press, 2013.
fanhackers 
7 weeks ago
Fanhackers • The rise of the Internet also meant that Comike...
"The rise of the Internet also meant that Comike lost its monopoly as the center of otaku and..." “The rise of the Internet also meant that Comike lost its monopoly as the center of otaku and dōjinshi culture. Nevertheless, Comike remained the most important event for Japanese fans, especially after companies with otaku-related products started to exploit it. Firms had been interested in Comic Market for decades as a never-ending pool of promising new talent and as a place to exploit them commercially, and they were willing to pay much money for direct access to these masses of otaku. Starting with NEC in the summer of 1995, companies were granted exhibition space to market or to sell their newest products. This was the birth of the dealer booth at Comike, and, as with dōjinshi circles, the number of applicant companies was much higher than that of available spaces: a self-sustaining event with such high attendance was too important for any related company to ignore. Companies accepted the existence of unlicensed parody dōjinshi using copyrighted material (albeit in a transformative and thus arguably fair-use manner) since they could now sell exclusive goods at Comike or use it as a marketing place, attracting to the convention people who were not interested indōjinshi.”
- Fan-Yi Lam, Comic Market: How the World’s Biggest Amateur Comic Fair Shaped Japanese Dōjinshi Culture, p240
fanhackers 
7 weeks ago
The OTW is Now a Humble Store Charity
Besides direct donations to OTW we have several other ways you can support our projects. As of November 2017 you can also choose us as a charity when making purchases at the Humble Store! Find out more & remember us if you're making purchases on Cyber Monday https://goo.gl/Ywu5Xz
Development-&-Membership-Committee  Financial-support  Announcement 
8 weeks ago
Call for Stories: Help the OTW Fight for Fair Use!
Are you a fanworks creator? Do you use screencaps or video clips in your fanfiction? If yes, help the OTW fight for fair use by telling us your story and signal boosting this message!
Legal-Advocacy  DMCA  Intellectual-Property 
8 weeks ago
This Week in Fandom, Volume 67
This Week in Fandom: @dril is human, Gal Gadot is against sexual misconduct, The Washington Post thinks fans are the most privileged, and NPR is doing a series on how fandom has enriched people's lives.
This_Week_in_Fandom  Fannish-Practices  Movies  Gender-and-Sexuality 
8 weeks ago
Fanhackers • Imaginactivism is—perhaps self-evidently—a...
"Imaginactivism is—perhaps self-evidently—a compound word made up of Imagine and Activism, but..." “Imaginactivism is—perhaps self-evidently—a compound word made up of Imagine and Activism, but intended to connote the process relationship between imagining and acting to make change in the world. The coinage is intended to signal a positive and effective relationship between creating and sharing visions of a better world that is possible and being moved by those visions to take practical action. It also suggests that we value imagining and imagination as an active process of crafting a vision that is a necessary precursor to worldly action, and sharing it with and in a community of ideas. The temporality of that relationship might work differently; our shared visions might emerge from the actions we take, or they might co-emerge or be co-created, but the important point is that we don’t regard the practice of imagining as simply escape or retreat from the world.”
- Joan Haran (2017): Instantiating Imaginactivism: Le Guin’s The Dispossessed as Inspiration. Ada: A Journal of Gender, New Media, and Technology, No. 12. http://ift.tt/2z8ivsl
fanhackers 
8 weeks ago
Fanhackers • As demonstrated above, the norms of print...
"As demonstrated above, the norms of print publishing above all else value public access: public..." “As demonstrated above, the norms of print publishing above all else value public access: public publishing, public circulation, public market through public buying and public selling, public reading, public engagement. The average fan text flouts these norms, whether because print zines are sold literally “under the table” at conventions or because fan works are posted to member-only online communities. The meaning of the word publish, “to issue text for sale or distribution to the public,” derives from its etymological root, which means “people.” This raises a deceptively simple question that has long dogged historians of women’s writing: What does it mean to be “published”? Historically, the difference between manuscript publishing and print publishing has rested on the insularity of the intended audience in the private sphere and the public acts associated with the public sphere.”
-

Coker, Catherine. 2017. “The Margins of Print? Fan Fiction as Book History.” Transformative Works and Cultures, no. 25.

In case you missed it, Cait Coker discusses fan fiction, the OTW, and this paper in a recent guest post for the OTW.
fanhackers 
8 weeks ago
The Boy / Michael Shanks Archive is Moving to the AO3
The Boy / Michael Shanks, a fanfiction archive for all characters played by actor Michael Shanks, is being imported to AO3! Learn more about the import–including how to claim your works–here: https://goo.gl/Xpzkom
Open-Doors-Committee  Fanfiction  Fannish-Histories 
8 weeks ago
OTW Guest Post: Catherine Coker
This month’s guest Cait Coker talks about women’s writing, book history & finding an entry to fandom at WalMart
Academia  Books  Fannish-Histories  Fanfiction  Guest-Post 
8 weeks ago
Fanhackers • In this sense, therefore, the informal practices...
"In this sense, therefore, the informal practices of fan culture appear uniquely compatible with a..." “

In this sense, therefore, the informal practices of fan culture appear uniquely compatible with a free and open culture in which participation in the processes of creation is unhindered by institutional or legal means.

More recent research into fan practice—particularly in relation to gaming—has nevertheless complicated the strict boundaries this “folk” imagery implies between fan and corporate production in a digital age. (…) Fans have thus been repeatedly conceptualized as the vanguard of new economies based in open, participatory cultural production.

But the fan-programmers behind Dominion War—just like those behind Gundam Century, Open Rebellion, and others—embraced hierarchy, closure, and proprietary creativity at the same time as they experimented with production logics outside of copyright control. As a case study, Dominion War complicates this equation of fan practice with free culture by pointing to negotiated transitions between closed commodity culture and open, peer-to-peer collaboration. While this TC did bear potential for ongoing, collectively intelligent cultural production, it also operated by upholding corporate hierarchies, privatized ownership, and monopolies of culture that thwarted the processual realization of that potential.


- Derek Johnson, StarCraft Fan Craft: Game Mods, Ownership, and Totally Incomplete Conversions, p53
fanhackers 
9 weeks ago
This Week in Fandom, Volume 66
This Week in Fandom: A new Harry Potter augmented reality game is on the way, Doctor Who reveals 13's costume, what the heck is Fandom 250, and more!
This_Week_in_Fandom  Sports  Television  Gaming 
9 weeks ago
Fanhackers • In discussing the idol system in Japan, we tend to...
"In discussing the idol system in Japan, we tend to think of the idol as a performer who is produced..." “In discussing the idol system in Japan, we tend to think of the idol as a performer who is produced by a talent agency and lends his/her image to the promotion of goods and services. However, as Bruno Latour (2005) argues, a better approach perhaps is to consider agency as distributed across a network of actors that all contribute to how interactions take place. That is, idols not only promote the sale of goods and services, but actually are produced by the goods and services that they sell. Rather than idols selling products, we have a system of commodities that is selling idols. By focusing on the idol alone, one loses sight of the network of relations that go into producing the idol. We falsely assume that agencies produce idols to perform on television or some other media stage, but the capitalist system too needs idols to advertise the products that it produces. The idol, then, is but a node in the network of the capitalist system of commodities that links producers to consumers.”
- Galbraith and Karlin, Idols and Celebrity in Japanese Media Culture, p8
fanhackers 
9 weeks ago
Five Things Raquel E. Said
In Five Things, translation volunteer Raquel shares their favorite thing in the world & how they see their work for the OTW https://goo.gl/NmkEJZ
Five-Things  Translation-Committee 
10 weeks ago
October 2017 Newsletter, Volume 118
Our journal is looking for fan contributions, AO3 has advice for those with multimedia embeds & the AO3 Docs team has a new FAQ out on skins for the site! https://goo.gl/7oahio
Newsletter  OTW-Sections 
10 weeks ago
This Week in Fandom, Volume 65
This Week in Fandom: Stranger Things, an FAQ for Article 13, an AI writes an X-Files script, and did we mention Stranger Things?
This_Week_in_Fandom  Television  Technology  Intellectual-Property 
10 weeks ago
Fanhackers • The New York Times validates the literary merit of...
"The New York Times validates the literary merit of fanfiction writing. Articles assure parents that..." “The New York Times validates the literary merit of fanfiction writing. Articles assure parents that their children’s dwindling literacies are simply being replaced by equally viable alternatives: their children are not reading and writing less, they are simply reading and writing differently. Fanfiction is framed as a healthy literacy practice, employed by local kids in public libraries (Aspan 2007; Warren 2011).”
- Drew Emanuel Berkowitz, Framing the Future of Fanfiction: How The New York Times’ Portrayal of a Youth Media Subculture Influences Beliefs about Media Literacy Education, p204
fanhackers 
10 weeks ago
Fanhackers • This very brief analysis of the history of German...
"This very brief analysis of the history of German fan fiction, as well as the results of our cursory..." “This very brief analysis of the history of German fan fiction, as well as the results of our cursory comparison of the exclusively German-language archive FanFiktion.de and the international Archive of Our Own, suggest that fandoms, fan practices, and fannish affections are complex and heterogeneous. Generalizing assumptions about an (imagined) unity in a specific fan fiction community are highly questionable. There is not, for example, a single Harry Potter fan fiction community but rather numerous ones that differ in their sets of rules, the socialization and education of their members, and the popularity of certain characters, pairings, tropes, or genres. In addition, political, historical, economic, and legal factors influence a national fan fiction history.”
- Cuntz-Leng, Vera, and Jacqueline Meintzinger. 2015. “A Brief History of Fan Fiction in Germany.” In “European Fans and European Fan Objects: Localization and Translation,” edited by Anne Kustritz, special issue, Transformative Works and Cultures, no. 19.
fanhackers 
10 weeks ago
Glass Onion is Moving to the AO3
Glass Onion, a multi-fandom fanfiction archive, is coming to AO3! Learn more here.
Open-Doors-Committee  Fanfiction 
10 weeks ago
International Volunteer Managers Day 2017
On International Volunteer Managers Day OTW celebrates our Volunteers and Recruiting Committee staff & their service.
Volunteers-&-Recruiting 
10 weeks ago
Fanhackers • By revising contemporary narratives of both book...
"By revising contemporary narratives of both book history and fan history, we can reread..." “By revising contemporary narratives of both book history and fan history, we can reread women’s work in the literary and book trades from the seventeenth and the twenty-first centuries as a function of operating with and subverting patriarchal norms of literary production. In other words, the more things change, the more they stay the same.”
- Coker, Catherine. 2017. “The Margins of Print? Fan Fiction as Book History.” Transformative Works and Cultures, no. 25.
fanhackers 
11 weeks ago
This Week in Fandom, Volume 64
This Week in Fandom: a call for papers from the Fan Studies Network, Malaysia blocks fanfiction.net, and The Szechuan Incident.
This_Week_in_Fandom  Fanfiction  Call-for-Papers  Conferences  Academia  Fannish-communities  Technology 
12 weeks ago
Fanhackers • If Whedon received scrutiny due to his feminist...
"If Whedon received scrutiny due to his feminist stance, and was limited by a studio system..." “If Whedon received scrutiny due to his feminist stance, and was limited by a studio system apparently reluctant to engage with gender representation, George Miller was comparatively unconstrained. One may expect a film concerned with male control and female autonomy would be scrutinised for having an all-male writing team, however Fury Road avoided this. (…) Issues of franchise and audience expectation are also relevant: both films were anticipated returns of popular franchises, but arguably Fury Road did not have the ‘baggage’ of incredibly high audience expectation, and the pressure of contributing to an expansive ‘super franchise’. Moreover, the Mad Max franchise is typically considered ‘masculinist’ escapist fantasy, leading to the presumption of a smaller female audience, as well as lowering expectations of female representation, thus creating favourable conditions for a ‘surprise’ feminist film. Seemingly, Whedon’s activism and feminist concerns added to the aforementioned ‘baggage’ making outright critical and fan praise potentially unachievable. Hence, if Whedon’s feminism clashed with Marvel’s sexism, creating ambiguity which invites criticism, Miller’s high-octane tale of emancipation paired with its legitimising feminist consultancy, suffered no such issues.”
-

ROWSON, Emily. 2017. ‘We Are Not Things’: Infertility, Reproduction, and Rhetoric of Control in Avengers: Age of Ultron and Mad Max: Fury Road. Networking Knowledge: Journal of the MeCCSA Postgraduate Network, 10(3) pp. 57-70.

Mad Max: Fury Road and Avengers: Age of Ultron were both released in 2015. MMFR was lauded by feminists (while upsetting “Men’s Rights Activists”) for its exploration of issues of bodily autonomy, while Ultron faced a much colder reception and was critised in particular for its treatment of Black Widow’s infertility. In this paper, Emily Rowson looks beyond the fan and audience reaction to these movies. She combines three different kinds of analysis. She takes into account the audience reception of the films. She also performs a close reading of the feminist themes in both movies. Finally, she looks at the role of the director (and particularly the director as auteur) in shaping both the film and the audience’s expectations of it. Ultimately she argues that MMFR perhaps wasn’t as feminist as we would like to think, while Ultron was somewhat hard done by. This paper may be a good opportunity to revisit both films to see what you think. (Or to watch cars explode in the desert. That’s good too.)
fanhackers 
12 weeks ago
Fanhackers • One of the most important goals that Fan Studies...
"One of the most important goals that Fan Studies can achieve as a discipline is to record watershed..." “One of the most important goals that Fan Studies can achieve as a discipline is to record watershed moments in online cultural history that often pass under the notice of more mainstream analysis.”
- Hemmann, Kathryn. 2017. Anime Fan Communities: Transcultural Flows and Frictions, by Sandra Annett [book review]. Transformative Works and Cultures, no. 25.
fanhackers 
12 weeks ago
Firefly’s Glow is Moving to the AO3
Hey Browncoats! Firefly’s Glow, a Firefly fanfiction archive, is being imported to #AO3. Learn more here
Open-Doors-Committee  Fanfiction 
12 weeks ago
Fanhackers • I was once told that book history is not...
"I was once told that book history is not applicable to the study of fan fiction as, “by..." “I was once told that book history is not applicable to the study of fan fiction as, “by definition,” such writing is not disseminated in book form—that is, as a printed codex.”
- Coker, Catherine. 2017. “The Margins of Print? Fan Fiction as Book History.” Transformative Works and Cultures, no. 25.
fanhackers 
october 2017
Thank You!
However you took part in #otwdonate, thank you for getting us started on our next 10 years! We've got some numbers for you about how this membership drive turned out: https://goo.gl/SMZamk
Financial-support  Development-&-Membership-Committee  Event 
october 2017
Fanhackers • Although Disney has yet to feature a queer female...
"Although Disney has yet to feature a queer female heroine in its fairy tale canon, that does not..." “Although Disney has yet to feature a queer female heroine in its fairy tale canon, that does not deter queer Disney femslash fans from poaching Disney texts in order to create fairy tales that legitimise their place in society. Through poaching, cutting, and splicing female characters from Disney’s animated canon, these Sapphic fans are re-joining Disney’s conservative silence with boundless creativity. In these new Disney fairy tales queer identities are no longer monstrous but commonplace, normal, and utterly human. So long as Walt Disney Studios remains silent on queer female representation in their animated films, the femslash fandom will continue to camp outside the Magic Kingdom’s gates.”
- Maier, Kodi (2017) Camping Outside the Magic Kingdom’s Gates: The Power of Femslash in the Disney Fandom. Networking Knowledge: Journal of the MeCCSA Postgraduate Network 10(3), p. 27-43.
fanhackers 
october 2017
Fanhackers • Issues of class, combined with issues of academic...
"Issues of class, combined with issues of academic disciplines, create a scholarly void where no one..." “Issues of class, combined with issues of academic disciplines, create a scholarly void where no one asks what fan fictions do that distinguishes them from other genres (Gray 2003). Instead, scholarship fixates on the acts of writers and the responding acts of readers, deftly avoiding horrifying h/c [hurt/comfort]’s unsavory content. In doing so, unique and inventive attributes of the genre are overlooked.”
- Linn, Rachel. 2017. “Bodies in Horrifying Hurt/Comfort Fan Fiction.” Transformative Works and Cultures, no. 25.
fanhackers 
october 2017
Looking Forward
Donors in the last 10 years have allowed the OTW to offer what it does today. Will you help us achieve more over the next 10? http://goo.gl/uF2LiA
Financial-support  Event  Development-&-Membership-Committee 
october 2017
Fanhackers • DIYHistory | Transcribe | Hevelin Fanzines
DIYHistory | Transcribe | Hevelin Fanzines DIYHistory | Transcribe | Hevelin Fanzines:

What an awesome opportunity for fans to get involved with the preservation of fannish materials and with fan studies research!
fanhackers 
october 2017
Fanhackers • Fanfiction is acting on media in at least two...
"Fanfiction is acting on media in at least two ways. By infrastructuring communities and publics,..." “Fanfiction is acting on media in at least two ways. By
infrastructuring communities and publics, authors, read-
ers and platform runners build up (own) communicative
and (quasi-)material spaces for circulating, sharing and
archiving the stories they want to write and read, for
the stories they cannot find in official canon productions.
By doing fanfiction, whether it is their intention or not,
they also question the existing political-juridical condi-
tions which frame transformative working and publish-
ing of derivative material. Fanfiction challenges preva-
lent concepts of individual authorship and proprietary of
cultural goods.”
-

Reißmann, W., Stock, M., Kaiser, S., Isenberg, V., & Nieland, J. U. (2017). Fan (fiction) acting on media and the politics of appropriation. Media and Communication, 5(3), 15-27.

This article uses the concept of “acting on media” to look at fannish activities. Acting on media is the idea that some media consumers (for instance activists, special interest groups, etc.) not only consume media or even contribute to things like social media sites - they actively shape media infrastructures and environments. Reißmann et al. find that fans do this in two ways: we actively build our own infrastructures (like the AO3) or appropriate and shape existing infrastructures for our own ends. Remeber what Maciej Cegłowski (the Pinboard Guy) said about the fannish migration from del.icio.us to Pinboard? That’s acting on media. Equally, through our sheer stubbornness and insistance in being allowed to create and share transformative works, we also ask all sorts of uncomfortable questions about who owns culture, who gets to be an author, and why.
fanhackers 
october 2017
OTW: A Decade of Serving Fans
The history of the OTW spans a full decade. To keep our work going, we need your support. Learn more and donate today
Event  Financial-support  Development-&-Membership-Committee 
october 2017
OTW Finance: 2017 Budget Update
We've updated our budget for the rest of the year, and we're making plans for the future, too! Learn more here.
Announcement  Finance-Commitee  Report 
october 2017
Fanhackers • Theme parks function as storytelling...
"Theme parks function as storytelling devices—material interfaces simultaneously engaging multiple..." “Theme parks function as storytelling devices—material interfaces simultaneously engaging multiple senses to immerse visitors in a variety of story worlds.”
- Godwin, Victoria. 2017. “Theme Park as Interface to the Wizarding (Story) World of Harry Potter.” Transformative Works and Cultures, no. 25.
fanhackers 
october 2017
Celebrate Ada Lovelace Day 2017
Happy Ada Lovelace Day from the OTW! Learn more about Ada Lovelace and her contribution to coding here.
Event  Women-in-technology 
october 2017
MTAC is Moving to the AO3
MTAC, an NCIS fanfiction archive, is moving to AO3. Did you post there? Learn more about the move and claiming your works here
Open-Doors-Committee  Fanfiction  Fannish-Histories  Television 
october 2017
Fanhackers • Asked about his group’s goals, he [Daniel, the...
"Asked about his group’s goals, he [Daniel, the founder of LEGO fan group Schwabenstein 2x4]..." “Asked about his group’s goals, he [Daniel, the founder of LEGO fan group Schwabenstein 2x4] says, “The fact that LEGO is art and culture has not yet sunk in with people. And that is why I consider it important and the right thing to do that we founded this association, in order to make people aware of the fact that Lego is not just a toy, it is a means to transform your thoughts into buildings” (translated by S. E.).”
- Einwächter, Sophie Gwendolyn, and Felix M. Simon. 2017. “How Digital Remix and Fan Culture Helped the Lego Comeback.” Transformative Works and Cultures, no. 25.
fanhackers 
october 2017
September 2017 Newsletter, Volume 117
In the OTW September newsletter: #OTW10 celebrations, upgrades to AO3, legal advocacy, and more! Read it all here.
Newsletter  OTW-Sections 
october 2017
Five Things SoyAlex Said
In FiveThings SoyAlex relates her glittery path to Fanlore staff & why there might be future restraining orders
Five-Things  Fanlore 
october 2017
OTW Guest Post: Betsy Craig
OTW guest Betsy Craig talks Hannibal fandom & the learning curve involved in launching a fan run convention: https://goo.gl/3wuKYP
Fan-conventions  Television  Fandoms  Guest-Post 
october 2017
The OTW is Recruiting Graphic Designers and Translators
Are you multilingual? Do you love making graphics? The OTW is recruiting graphic designers & translators!

There is particular need for translators who know Arabic, Bengali, Catalan, Chinese, Croatian, Danish, Filipino, Finnish, Hebrew, Hungarian, Japanese, Kiswahili, Korean, Latvian, Malay, Marathi, Norwegian, Polish, Serbian, Turkish, Vietnamese, and Welsh.

Learn more and apply here!
Volunteering  Fanlore-Committee  Translation-Committee 
october 2017
Fanhackers • It requires a certain cultural expertise and...
"It requires a certain cultural expertise and freedom to be able to arrange cultural fragments..." “It requires a certain cultural expertise and freedom to be able to arrange cultural fragments skilfully to new ends. This is reflected in The LEGO Movie, where the most prestigious characters are so-called masterbuilders, people who have the actual ideas for new arrangements and who can build their own creations (MOCs) without instructions. Interestingly, the crime of the film’s villain consists of gluing Lego bricks together so they can no longer be used by someone else or for different purposes. The narrative can thus be read alongside popular critiques of copyright like the one undertaken by Lawrence Lessig (2008) in his book Remix where he states that cultural production has always depended on the usage of existing material and that current copyright and trademark legislations increasingly hinder cultural participation. The glue in the Lego film’s narrative can thus be interpreted as a copyright not flexible enough for creative and out-of-the-box-thinking, a threat to the masterbuilders of our culture. While subtly criticizing a copyright not fit for the digital age of remixing, The LEGO Movie pays homage to older media and to the tangibility of Lego bricks through analog cues.”
- Einwächter, Sophie Gwendolyn, and Felix M. Simon. 2017. “How Digital Remix and Fan Culture Helped the Lego Comeback.” Transformative Works and Cultures, no. 25.
fanhackers 
october 2017
West Wing Fanfiction Central is Moving to the AO3
West Wing Fanfiction Central, a West Wing fanfiction archive, is being imported to AO3. Learn more here
Open-Doors-Committee  Fanfiction  Television 
october 2017
Fanhackers • The collective nature of the event, with thousands...
"The collective nature of the event, with thousands of players convening on one digital space, has a..." “The collective nature of the event, with thousands of players convening on one digital space, has a disruptive effect on the gameplay of others, analogous to that of a sit-in or blockade…Players who are not aware of the event are often surprised as a large group of gnomes runs through their area; sometimes they join the event out of curiosity and learn about the charity cause along the way.”
- Collister, Lauren B. 2017. “Transformative (H)activism: Breast Cancer Awareness and the World of Warcraft Running of the Gnomes.” Transformative Works and Cultures, no. 25.
fanhackers 
october 2017
Support the OTW by Reading!
Want to read about fanfiction? There are various ways to support the Organization for Transformative Works but this might be the most fun: https://goo.gl/g3DnBw
Books  Transformative-Works-and-Cultures  Financial-support  Anniversary  Academia  Studies  Fanfiction 
september 2017
Fanhackers • New fan studies research post coming next week
New fan studies research post coming next week

We have to skip a week with our list of new/recent fan studies research because we’re experiencing technical issues. Apologies for the inconvenience!
fanhackers 
september 2017
A Little Piece of Gundam Wing and Soul Circuit are Moving to the AO3
Coming to AO3: a little piece of gundam wing & soul circuit, fanwork archives for Gundam Wing and Koko Wa Greenwood. Find out more here.
Fanfiction  Fan-art  Anime-and-Manga  Open-Doors-Committee 
september 2017
Fanhackers • [T]his essay (…) forwards an initial rereading of...
"[T]his essay (…) forwards an initial rereading of the Superman origin story as influenced by..." “[T]his essay (…) forwards an initial rereading of the Superman origin story as influenced by my own experiences of transitioning genders. Within the world of comics, an origin story typically refers to a canonized account that explains how a hero or group of heroes came into being. The assumption that one may be able to precisely locate the moment or moments during which the superhero identity began to take shape may ring familiar to trans readers, who may similarly be asked to continually locate the origins of their own gender identities—the presumption being, of course, that cis persons are not usually asked the question ‘When did you know?’ While the textual examples used in this article in some way entertain the idea that a point of origin is possible to locate, I wish to show how these narratives are perhaps the most malleable to reinterpret from a trans reading position given the overlapping and persistent preoccupation with locating identity within a specific temporal boundary.”
-

Vena, Dan. 2017. “Rereading Superman as a Trans F/Man.” Transformative Works and Cultures, no. 25.

Dan Vena’s essay intertwines his experience as a trans man and trans fan with his reading and “transing” of Superman, as well as theories of comic books, superheroes, and gender. His rereading of Superman as a trans character allows him to ask questions about ideas of boyhood, masculinity, and becoming a man - for both trans and cis men. Vena’s personal narrative of his experiences of transition and his relationship with SUperman as a fan object is a running theme throughout the essay, making it a very accessible piece of scholarship.
fanhackers 
september 2017
This Week in Fandom, Volume 63
This Week in Fandom: A victory for fair use, American Ninja Warrior inspired fitness, pop music stan life, and more!
This_Week_in_Fandom  Music  Theater  Television  Gender-and-Sexuality  Fannish-Practices  Intellectual-Property 
september 2017
Could You Win an OTW Trivia Contest?
Would you like to find some OTW trivia? If so, we've got prizes for you! How many questions can you answer?
Books  Anniversary  Event  Communications-Committee 
september 2017
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