nhaliday + film   70

Charade | West Hunter
I was watching Charade the other day, not for the first time, and was noticing that the action scenes with Cary Grant (human fly, and fighting George Kennedy) really weren’t very convincing.  Age. But think what it would be like today: we’d see Audrey Hepburn kicking the living shit out of Kennedy, probably cutting his throat with his own claw – while still being utterly adorable.

https://westhunt.wordpress.com/2018/03/04/shtrafbats/
Was thinking about how there are far too many reviewers, and far too few movies worth reviewing. It might be fun to review the movies that should have been made, instead. Someone ought to make a movie about the life of Konstantin Rokossovsky – an officer arrested and tortured by Stalin (ended up with denailed fingers and steel teeth) who became one of the top Soviet generals. The story would be focused on his command of 16th Army in the final defense of Moscow – an army group composed entirely of penal battalions. The Legion of the Damned.

https://westhunt.wordpress.com/2018/03/04/shtrafbats/#comment-103767
There hasn’t been a good Gulag Archipelago movie, has there?

One historical movie that I’d really like to see would be about the defense of Malta by the Knights of St. John. That or the defense of Vienna. Either one would be very “timely”, which is a word many reviewers seem to misuse quite laughably these days.
--
My oldest son made the same suggestion – The Great Siege

Siege of Vienna – Drawing of the Dark?

https://westhunt.wordpress.com/2018/03/04/shtrafbats/#comment-103846
The Conquest of New Spain.
--
Only Cortez was fully awake. Him and von Neumann.
west-hunter  scitariat  reflection  discussion  aphorism  troll  film  culture  classic  multi  review  history  mostly-modern  world-war  russia  communism  authoritarianism  military  war  poast  medieval  conquest-empire  expansionism  age-of-discovery  europe  eastern-europe  mediterranean  usa  latin-america  big-peeps  von-neumann  giants 
march 2018 by nhaliday
Gladiator Quotes - YouTube
LUCILLA: They care about the greatness of Rome.
COMMODUS: Greatness of Rome? But what is that?
LUCILLA: It's an idea, greatness. Greatness is a vision.
COMMODUS: Exactly. A vision. I will give the people a vision and they will love me for it. They will soon forget the tedious sermonizing of a few dry old men. I will give them the greatest vision of their lives.

GRACCHUS: I think he knows what Rome is. Rome is the mob. He will conjure magic for them and they will be distracted. He will take away their freedom, and still they will roar. The beating heart of Rome is not the marble floor of the Senate, it is the sand of the Colosseum. He will give them death, and they will love him for it.
video  film  history  iron-age  mediterranean  the-classics  conquest-empire  civilization  rot  democracy  antidemos  egalitarianism-hierarchy  sulla  tribalism  illusion  cynicism-idealism  quotes  entertainment  vulgar  leadership  civil-liberty  benevolence 
january 2018 by nhaliday
The Constitutional Economics of Autocratic Succession on JSTOR
Abstract. The paper extends and empirically tests Gordon Tullock’s public choice theory of the nature of autocracy. A simple model of the relationship between constitutional rules governing succession in autocratic regimes and the occurrence of coups against autocrats is sketched. The model is applied to a case study of coups against monarchs in Denmark in the period ca. 935–1849. A clear connection is found between the specific constitutional rules governing succession and the frequency of coups. Specifically, the introduction of automatic hereditary succession in an autocracy provides stability and limits the number of coups conducted by contenders.

Table 2. General constitutional rules of succession, Denmark ca. 935–1849

To see this the data may be divided into three categories of constitutional rules of succession: One of open succession (for the periods 935–1165 and 1326–40), one of appointed succession combined with election (for the periods 1165–1326 and 1340–1536), and one of more or less formalized hereditary succession (1536–1849). On the basis of this categorization the data have been summarized in Table 3.

validity of empirics is a little sketchy

https://twitter.com/GarettJones/status/922103073257824257
https://archive.is/NXbdQ
The graphic novel it is based on is insightful, illustrates Tullock's game-theoretic, asymmetric information views on autocracy.

Conclusions from Gorton Tullock's book Autocracy, p. 211-215.: https://astro.temple.edu/~bstavis/courses/tulluck.htm
study  polisci  political-econ  economics  cracker-econ  big-peeps  GT-101  info-econ  authoritarianism  antidemos  government  micro  leviathan  elite  power  institutions  garett-jones  multi  econotariat  twitter  social  commentary  backup  art  film  comics  fiction  competition  europe  nordic  empirical  evidence-based  incentives  legacy  peace-violence  order-disorder  🎩  organizing  info-dynamics  history  medieval  law  axioms  stylized-facts  early-modern  data  longitudinal  flux-stasis  shift  revolution  correlation  org:junk  org:edu  summary  military  war  top-n  hi-order-bits  feudal  democracy  sulla  leadership  protocol  nascent-state 
october 2017 by nhaliday
Django Unchained, or, The Help: How “Cultural Politics” Is Worse Than No Politics at All, and Why | nonsite.org
By Adolph Reed, Jr. (University of Pennsylvania)

This is a perspective that can provide some badly needed clarity on debates in contemporary politics regarding the relation of race, racism and inequality. For example, Ron and Rand Paul, libertarians of the highest order, do not oppose the 1964 Civil Rights Law because they hate, or even don’t like, black people. (And, for the record, whenever one finds oneself agreeing at all with Kanye West about anything, it’s time to take a step back, breathe deeply and reassess.) They oppose it, as they’ve made clear, because it infringes on property rights. They dislike black people because they understand, correctly, that black people are very likely to be prominent among those committed to pursuing greater equality. They oppose black people’s demands and all others intended to mitigate inequality because any efforts to do so would necessarily impinge on the absolute sanctity of property rights. I don’t mean to suggest that the Pauls aren’t racist; I’m pretty confident they are, no matter how much they might protest the assessment. My point is that determining whether they’re racist, then exposing and denouncing them for it, doesn’t reach to what is most consequentially wrong and dangerous about them or for that matter what makes their racism something more significant than that of the random bigot who lives around the corner on disability.
journos-pundits  film  review  critique  culture  art  aesthetics  analysis  essay  race  politics  culture-war  ideology  values  civil-liberty  randy-ayndy  discrimination  property-rights  ethnocentrism  left-wing  egalitarianism-hierarchy  coalitions  identity-politics  class-warfare  inequality  envy 
june 2017 by nhaliday
Original pronunciation of "Ceasar"? : AskHistorians
So was Cicero (Sissero) pronounced Kikkero? Does the hard "k" only apply to the first letter making it Kissero?

KEE-ker-o would be the Latin pronunciation as far as we can tell, yes.

..wow, so that would make 'veni vidi vici' sound like "weeney, weedie, wiki"?

more like "wenny, widdy, wiki"

Wait, does this mean that the "Biggus Dickus" scene from Monty Python's Life of Brian was (in addition to being a funny scene) poking fun at what people might actually have sounded like when they were speaking proper Latin?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zPGb4STRfKw
q-n-a  reddit  social  discussion  history  iron-age  mediterranean  foreign-lang  the-classics  multi  video  film  lol  comedy 
june 2017 by nhaliday
How important was colonial trade for the rise of Europe? | Economic Growth in History
The latter view became the orthodoxy among economists and economic historians after Patrick O’Brien’s 1982 paper, which in one of many of Patrick’s celebrated phrases, claims that “”the periphery vs peripheral” for Europe. He concludes the paper by writing:

“[G]rowth, stagnation, and decay everywhere in Western Europe can be explained mainly by reference to endogenous forces. … for the economic growth of the core, the periphery was peripheral.”

This is the view that remarkable scholars such as N. Crafts, Deirdre McCloskey, or Joel Mokyr repeat today (though Crafts would argue cotton imports would have mattered in a late stage, and my reading of Mokyr is that he has softened his earlier view from the 1980s a little, specifically in the book The Enlightened Economy.) Even recently, Brad deLong has classifyied O’Brien’s 1982 position as “air tight”.

Among economists and economic historians more on the economics side, I would say that O’Brien’s paper was only one of two strong hits against the “Worlds-System” and related schools of thoughts of the 1970s, the other hit being Solow’s earlier conclusion that TFP growth (usually interpreted as technology, though there’s more to it than that) has accounted for economic growth a great deal more than capital accumulation, which is what Hobsbawm and Wallerstein, in their neo-Marxist framework, emphasize.

https://twitter.com/tcjfs/status/890034395456974848
A friend tonight, on the third world and the first world, and our relationships to the past: "They don't forget, and we don't remember."
https://twitter.com/edwest/status/872337163458932736
imo the European Intifada is being fueled by anti-Europeanism & widely taught ideas like this one discussed - Europe stole its riches

https://www.thinkpragati.com/opinion/1863/dont-blame-empire/
The British Empire was cruel, rapacious and racist. But contrary to what Shashi Tharoor writes in An Era Of Darkness, the fault for India’s miseries lies upon itself.

Indeed, the anti-Tharoor argument is arguably closer to the truth, because the British tended to use the landlord system in places where landlords were already in place, and at times when the British were relatively weak and couldn’t afford to upset tradition. Only after they became confident in their power did the British start to bypass the landlord class and tax the cultivators directly. King’s College London historian Jon Wilson (2016) writes in India Conquered, “Wherever it was implemented, raiyatwar began as a form of military rule.” Thus the system that Tharoor implicitly promotes, and which is associated with higher agricultural productivity today, arose from the very same colonialism that he blames for so many of India’s current woes. History does not always tell the parables that we wish to hear.

...

India’s share of the world economy was large in the eighteenth century for one simple reason: when the entire world was poor, India had a large share of the world’s population. India’s share fell because with the coming of the Industrial Revolution, Europe and North America saw increases of income per capita to levels never before seen in all of human history. This unprecedented growth cannot be explained by Britain’s depredations against India. Britain was not importing steam engines from India.

The big story of the Great Divergence is not that India got poorer, but that other countries got much richer. Even at the peak of Mughal wealth in 1600, the best estimates of economic historians suggest that GDP per capita was 61% higher in Great Britain. By 1750–before the battle of Plassey and the British takeover–GDP per capita in Great Britain was more than twice what it was in India (Broadberry, Custodis, and Gupta 2015). The Great Divergence has long roots.

Tharoor seems blinded by the glittering jewels of the Maharajas and the Mughals. He writes with evident satisfaction that when in 1615 the first British ambassador presented himself to the court of Emperor Jehangir in Agra, “the Englishman was a supplicant at the feet of the world’s mightiest and most opulent monarch.” True; but the Emperor’s opulence was produced on the backs of millions of poor subjects. Writing at the same time and place, the Dutch merchant Francisco Pelsaert (1626) contrasted the “great superfluity and absolute power” of the rich with “the utter subjection and poverty of the common people–poverty so great and miserable that the life of the people can be depicted…only as the home of stark want and the dwelling-place of bitter woe.” Indian rulers were rich because the empire was large and inequality was extreme.

In pre-colonial India the rulers, both Mughal and Maratha, extracted _anywhere from one-third to one half of all gross agricultural output_ and most of what was extracted was spent on opulence and the armed forces, not on improving agricultural productivity (Raychaudhuri 1982).

...

The British were awful rulers but the history of India is a long story of awful rulers (just as it is for most countries). Indeed, by Maddison’s (2007) calculations _the British extracted less from the Indian economy than did the Mughal Dynasty_. The Mughals built their palaces in India while the British built most of their palaces in Britain, but that was little comfort to the Indian peasant who paid for both. The Kohinoor diamond that graces the cover of Inglorious Empire is a telling symbol. Yes, it was stolen by the British (who stole it from the Sikhs who stole it from the Afghanis who stole it from the Mughals who stole it from one of the kings of South India). But how many Indians would have been better off if this bauble had stayed in India? Perhaps one reason why more Indians didn’t take up arms against the British was that for most of them, British rule was a case of meet the new boss, same as the old boss.

more for effect on colonies: https://pinboard.in/u:nhaliday/b:4b0128372fe9

INDIA AND THE GREAT DIVERGENCE: AN ANGLO-INDIAN COMPARISON OF GDP PER CAPITA, 1600-1871: http://eh.net/eha/wp-content/uploads/2013/11/Guptaetal.pdf
This paper provides estimates of Indian GDP constructed from the output side for the pre-1871 period, and combines them with population estimates to track changes in living standards. Indian per capita GDP declined steadily during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries before stabilising during the nineteenth century. As British living standards increased from the mid-seventeenth century, India fell increasingly behind. Whereas in 1600, Indian per capita GDP was over 60 per cent of the British level, by 1871 it had fallen to less than 15 per cent. As well as placing the origins of the Great Divergence firmly in the early modern period, the estimates suggest a relatively prosperous India at the height of the Mughal Empire, with living standards well above bare bones subsistence.

https://twitter.com/pseudoerasmus/status/832288984009207810
but some of the Asian wage data (especialy India) have laughably small samples (see Broadberry & Gupta)

How profitable was colonialism for various European powers?: https://www.reddit.com/r/AskHistorians/comments/p1q1q/how_profitable_was_colonialism_for_various/

How did Britain benefit from colonising India? What did colonial powers gain except for a sense of power?: https://www.quora.com/How-did-Britain-benefit-from-colonising-India-What-did-colonial-powers-gain-except-for-a-sense-of-power
The EIC period was mostly profitable, though it had recurring problems with its finances. The initial voyages from Surat in 1600s were hugely successful and brought profits as high as 200%. However, the competition from the Dutch East India Company started to drive down prices, at least for spices. Investing in EIC wasn’t always a sure shot way to gains - British investors who contributed to the second East India joint stock of 1.6 million pounds between 1617 and 1632 ended up losing money.

...

An alternate view is that the revenues of EIC were very small compared to the GDP of Britain, and hardly made an impact to the overall economy. For instance, the EIC Revenue in 1800 was 7.8m pounds while the British GDP in the same period was 343m pounds, and hence EIC revenue was only 2% of the overall GDP. (I got these figures from an individual blog and haven’t verified them).

...

The British Crown period - The territory of British India Provinces had expanded greatly and therefore the tax revenues had grown in proportion. The efficient taxation system paid its own administrative expenses as well as the cost of the large British Indian Army. British salaries were lucrative - the Viceroy received £25,000 a year, and Governors £10,000 for instance besides the lavish amenities in the form of subsidized housing, utilities, rest houses, etc.

...

Indian eminent intellectual, Dadabhai Naoroji wrote how the British systematically ensured the draining of Indian economy of its wealth and his theory is famously known as ‘Drain of Wealth’ theory. In his book 'Poverty' he estimated a 200–300 million pounds loss of revenue to Britain that is not returned.

At the same time, a fair bit of money did go back into India itself to support further colonial infrastructure. Note the explosion of infrastructure (Railway lines, 100+ Cantonment towns, 60+ Hill stations, Courthouses, Universities, Colleges, Irrigation Canals, Imperial capital of New Delhi) from 1857 onward till 1930s. Of course, these infrastructure projects were not due to any altruistic motive of the British. They were intended to make their India empire more secure, comfortable, efficient, and to display their grandeur. Huge sums of money were spent in the 3 Delhi Durbars conducted in this period.

So how profitable was the British Crown period? Probably not much. Instead bureaucracy, prestige, grandeur, comfort reigned supreme for the 70,000 odd British people in India.

...

There was a realization in Britain that colonies were not particularly economically beneficial to the home economy. … [more]
econotariat  broad-econ  article  history  early-modern  age-of-discovery  europe  the-great-west-whale  divergence  conquest-empire  economics  growth-econ  roots  trade  endo-exo  patho-altruism  expansionism  multi  twitter  social  discussion  gnon  unaffiliated  right-wing  🎩  attaq  albion  journos-pundits  mokyr-allen-mccloskey  cjones-like  big-picture  chart  news  org:mag  org:foreign  marginal-rev  wealth-of-nations  britain  india  asia  cost-benefit  leviathan  antidemos  religion  islam  class  pop-structure  nationalism-globalism  authoritarianism  property-rights  agriculture  econ-metrics  data  scale  government  industrial-revolution  pdf  regularizer  pseudoE  measurement  volo-avolo  time-series  anthropology  macro  sapiens  books  review  summary  counterfactual  stylized-facts  critique  heavy-industry  pre-ww2  study  technology  energy-resources  labor  capitalism  debate  org:data  org:lite  commentary  usa  piketty  variance-components  automation  west-hunter  scitariat  visualization  northeast  the-south  aphorism  h2o  fluid 
june 2017 by nhaliday
Romanticizing the regressive – Brown Pundits
As far back as Herodotus Indian society seems to have been characterized by caste. Genetically the castes, and more precisely jatis, are very distinct. And their persistence on the Indian scene suggest some level of functional utility.

...

The connections between liberal Democratic Indian Americans and right-wing Hindu nationalism in India have been extensively discussed. That is not what I am getting at. Meet the Patels is not a political film, it is a personal one. There is no reason that Ravi should address political topics in the documentary, and much of what I am saying here would be implicit to any South Asian watching Meet the Patels. But to many Americans these darker realities would not be visible or implied in the cultural practices which Ravi admires.

http://www.brownpundits.com/2017/06/05/a-reply-to-a-stupid-ignorant-or-malicious-commenter/
gnxp  scitariat  commentary  film  documentary  culture  india  asia  world  developing-world  class  tribalism  migration  assimilation  tradition  multi  genetics  pop-structure  the-classics  hypocrisy 
june 2017 by nhaliday
quotes - What is the linguistic challenge Louise uses in the beginning of "Arrival"? - Science Fiction & Fantasy Stack Exchange
So it's a bit of a stretch. It really does look like गविष्टि gáviṣṭi- can have the meaning "war", but it's not an obvious choice. Certainly, गविष्टि gáviṣṭi- is (by my lights) a poor translation for "war" in the general case. Which is to say, if you asked a Sanskrit teacher, how do you say "war" in Sanskrit, and they said gáviṣṭi-, I would be surprised. It would be like somebody asking you how to say 'baldness' and you offering up 'glabriety', which I'm told means "baldness". The point being, it seems contrived, the word was chosen because it made for a fun scene in the film, rather than because it was the natural choice. What's more, I haven't a clue where the potential meaning "discussion" comes from. But then I did fail two of my exams....
q-n-a  stackex  fiction  language  foreign-lang  india  asia  gavisti  film  scifi-fantasy  linguistics 
may 2017 by nhaliday
Secular decline in testosterone levels - Rogue Health and Fitness
A Population-Level Decline in Serum Testosterone Levels in American Men: http://sci-hub.tw/10.1210/jc.2006-1375
Secular trends in sex hormones and fractures in men and women: http://www.eje-online.org/content/166/5/887.full.pdf
https://twitter.com/toad_spotted/status/984543033285898246
https://archive.is/dcruu
Small n and older sample, but interesting that while testosterone decreases have been large for men they’ve been even larger (in % terms) for women; wonder if this contributes to declining pregnancy and sexual frequency, rising depression.

https://www.labcorp.com/assets/11476
http://www.theamericanconservative.com/articles/sperm-killers-and-rising-male-infertility/
https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2017/jul/25/sperm-counts-among-western-men-have-halved-in-last-40-years-study
https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2017/08/most-men-in-the-us-and-europe-could-be-infertile-by-2060
Strangelove: https://youtu.be/N1KvgtEnABY?t=67

https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/sperm-count-dropping-in-western-world/
https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=14855796
https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=14857588
People offering human-centric explanations like cell phones: Note also that the sperm quality of dogs has decreased 30% since 1988.

mendelian rand.:
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28448539
1 SD genetically instrumented increase in BMI was associated with a 0.25 SD decrease in serum testosterone
https://twitter.com/SilverVVulpes/status/857902555489341441

Ibuprofen linked to male infertility: study: https://nypost.com/2018/01/08/ibuprofen-linked-to-male-infertility-study/
http://www.pnas.org/content/115/4/E715.full

Tucker Carlson: "Men Seem To Be Becoming Less Male": https://www.realclearpolitics.com/video/2018/03/08/tucker_carlson_men_seem_to_be_becoming_less_male.html
Carlson interviewed Dr. Jordan Peterson who blamed the "insidious" movement being driven by the "radical left" that teaches there a problem of "toxic masculinity." He said ideological policies focus on "de-emphasizing masculinity may be part of the problem."

...

Those are the numbers. They paint a very clear picture: American men are failing, in body, mind and spirit. This is a crisis. Yet our leaders pretend it’s not happening. They tell us the opposite is true: Women are victims, men are oppressors. To question that assumption is to risk punishment. Even as women far outpace men in higher education, virtually every college campus supports a women’s studies department, whose core goal is to attack male power. Our politicians and business leaders internalize and amplify that message. Men are privileged. Women are oppressed. Hire and promote and reward accordingly.

https://pinboard.in/u:nhaliday/b:bd7b0a50d741
But it also hints at an almost opposite take: average testosterone levels have been falling for decades, so at this point these businessmen would be the only “normal” (by 1950s standards) men out there, and everyone else would be unprecedently risk-averse and boring.
org:health  fitsci  health  endocrine  trends  public-health  science-anxiety  gender  commentary  multi  study  pdf  data  piracy  white-paper  gnon  news  org:mag  right-wing  fertility  dysgenics  drugs  psychiatry  stress  politics  government  hypochondria  idk  embodied  FDA  externalities  epidemiology  video  film  classic  org:lite  org:anglo  genetics  endo-exo  mendel-randomization  obesity  fitness  scitariat  🌞  medicine  correlation  intervention  causation  GWAS  environmental-effects  hn  org:sci  popsci  model-organism  embodied-cognition  hmm  org:davos  communism  memes(ew)  fluid  endogenous-exogenous  roots  explanans  org:local  summary  modernity  rot  org:nat  chart  the-bones  albion  canada  journos-pundits  philosophy  iq  coming-apart  malaise  gender-diff  attention  disease  opioids  death  interview  current-events  tv  higher-ed  labor  management  compensation  grad-school  law  twitter  social  backup  ratty  unaffiliated  yvain  ssc 
may 2017 by nhaliday
Gummo - Wikipedia
Gummo is a 1997 American dystopian art film written and directed by Harmony Korine, starring Jacob Reynolds, Nick Sutton, Jacob Sewell, and Chloë Sevigny. The film is set in Xenia, Ohio, a small, poor Midwestern American town that had been previously struck by a devastating tornado. The loose narrative follows several main characters who find odd and destructive ways to pass time, interrupted by vignettes depicting other inhabitants of the town.

https://www.reddit.com/r/TrueFilm/comments/5ub6g5/gummo_a_raw_unfiltered_look_at_how_ugly_life_can/
film  weird  mystic  wiki  tip-of-tongue  hmm  stagnation  multi  reddit  social  discussion  midwest  malaise  nihil  coming-apart 
march 2017 by nhaliday
Titus (film) - Wikipedia
Titus is a 1999 Italian-American-British film adaptation of William Shakespeare's revenge tragedy Titus Andronicus, about the downfall of a Roman general. Starring Anthony Hopkins and Jessica Lange, it was the first theatrically-released feature film adaptation of the play.
film  classic  wiki  literature  big-peeps  shakespeare 
january 2017 by nhaliday
In China, prisoners of conscience are literally being butchered - The Boston Globe
In 1999, Chinese hospitals began performing more than 10,000 organ transplants annually, generating a vast and lucrative traffic in “transplant tourists,” who flocked to China on the assurance that they could obtain lifesaving organs without having to languish on a waiting list. China had no voluntary organ-donation system to speak of, yet suddenly it was providing tens of thousands of freshly harvested organs to patients with ready cash or high-placed connections. How was that possible?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Organ_transplantation_in_China
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Organ_harvesting_from_Falun_Gong_practitioners_in_China
news  documentary  film  wtf  china  asia  anomie  civil-liberty  multi  org:rec  authoritarianism  crooked  embodied  corruption  madisonian  orient  world  wiki  org:local 
december 2016 by nhaliday
The Holy Mountain (1973 film) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
1973 Mexican-American surreal fantasy film directed, written, produced, co-scored, co-edited by and starring Alejandro Jodorowsky, who also participated as a set designer and costume designer on the film
film  classic  wiki  art  tip-of-tongue  mystic 
september 2016 by nhaliday
Local Films
A report from December 1900 informs us that Lawrence’s world-famed electrograph was topping the bill at Belper Fair with a local film of Belper mill hands leaving work. A similar pattern is observed at Norwich Christmas Fair where Crighton Electrograph’s ‘great draw’ was a film of Coleman’s workpeople leaving the factory. Town Hall exhibitors were also quick to see the popularity of the local draw and The Showman reports that the following week Mr Albert Coe of Norwich also presented local films, of Messrs Coleman’s starch factory and the workpeople leaving the works at dinner hour. The
Coleman’s factory gate film was again shown in Norwich by the Animated Picture Company in March 1901 and still proved popular with the audiences.
pdf  film  cocktail  art  history  classic  documentary  heavy-industry 
august 2016 by nhaliday

bundles : dismalityvulgar

related tags

2016-election  absolute-relative  academia  accelerationism  acm  advertising  advice  aesthetics  africa  afterlife  age-generation  age-of-discovery  agri-mindset  agriculture  albion  alg-combo  alignment  AMT  analysis  anglo  anglosphere  anomie  anthropology  antidemos  antiquity  aphorism  archaeology  archaics  aristos  art  article  asia  assimilation  attaq  attention  authoritarianism  automation  axioms  backup  beauty  behavioral-gen  being-becoming  being-right  benevolence  big-peeps  big-picture  biodet  biotech  blowhards  books  britain  broad-econ  business  canada  canon  capitalism  career  causation  chart  china  christianity  civic  civil-liberty  civilization  cjones-like  class  class-warfare  classic  clever-rats  clinton  cliometrics  coalitions  cocktail  cog-psych  cold-war  comedy  comics  coming-apart  commentary  communism  compensation  competition  concept  conceptual-vocab  conquest-empire  consumerism  cool  cooperate-defect  coordination  corporation  correlation  corruption  cost-benefit  counter-revolution  counterfactual  cracker-econ  creative  crime  criminal-justice  criminology  CRISPR  critique  crooked  cultural-dynamics  culture  culture-war  curiosity  current-events  cynicism-idealism  data  data-science  database  death  debate  degrees-of-freedom  democracy  demographics  design  developing-world  dignity  dimensionality  discipline  discrimination  discussion  disease  distribution  divergence  diversity  documentary  douthatish  drugs  duality  duty  dysgenics  early-modern  eastern-europe  econ-metrics  econ-productivity  economics  econotariat  eden  eden-heaven  EEA  egalitarianism-hierarchy  eh  elite  embodied  embodied-cognition  emotion  empirical  endo-exo  endocrine  endogenous-exogenous  ends-means  energy-resources  enhancement  enlightenment-renaissance-restoration-reformation  entertainment  entrepreneurialism  environmental-effects  envy  epidemiology  epistemic  equilibrium  eric-kaufmann  essay  essence-existence  ethanol  ethics  ethnocentrism  europe  evidence-based  evolution  evopsych  expansionism  explanans  exposition  externalities  extra-introversion  farmers-and-foragers  FDA  fertility  feudal  fiction  fighting  film  finance  fire  fitness  fitsci  fluid  flux-stasis  food  foreign-lang  forms-instances  french  frisson  frontier  futurism  gallic  garett-jones  gavisti  gender  gender-diff  genetics  giants  gnon  gnxp  god-man-beast-victim  good-evil  government  grad-school  great-powers  growth-econ  GT-101  GWAS  h2o  hacker  hanson  health  healthcare  heavy-industry  herzog  heuristic  hi-order-bits  hidden-motives  higher-ed  history  hmm  hn  horror  hsu  hypochondria  hypocrisy  identity-politics  ideology  idk  illusion  impact  incentives  increase-decrease  india  industrial-revolution  inequality  inference  info-dynamics  info-econ  innovation  insight  institutions  integral  intel  intelligence  intervention  interview  iq  iron-age  islam  israel  janus  japan  jargon  journos-pundits  judaism  justice  labor  language  latin-america  law  leadership  left-wing  legacy  lesswrong  leviathan  limits  linguistics  links  list  literature  lived-experience  lmao  logic  lol  longform  longitudinal  macro  madisonian  malaise  management  marginal-rev  markets  math  math.CA  math.CO  math.NT  mathtariat  measurement  media  medicine  medieval  mediterranean  memes(ew)  MENA  mendel-randomization  metabuch  metameta  micro  midwest  migration  military  model-organism  modernity  mokyr-allen-mccloskey  monetary-fiscal  money  morality  mostly-modern  multi  music  mystic  myth  narrative  nascent-state  nationalism-globalism  nature  near-far  neuro  neurons  news  nibble  nietzschean  nihil  nordic  northeast  nostalgia  obesity  objektbuch  occident  oly  open-closed  opioids  optimate  order-disorder  org:anglo  org:biz  org:bleg  org:data  org:davos  org:edu  org:foreign  org:health  org:junk  org:lite  org:local  org:mag  org:nat  org:rec  org:sci  organization  organizing  orient  p:null  parasites-microbiome  parody  patho-altruism  pdf  peace-violence  people  personality  phalanges  philosophy  physics  piketty  piracy  poast  polarization  polisci  political-econ  politics  poll  pop-diff  pop-structure  popsci  populism  power  pre-ww2  primitivism  pro-rata  profile  project  property-rights  protestant-catholic  protocol  pseudoE  psych-architecture  psychedelics  psychiatry  psychology  public-health  q-n-a  qra  quotes  race  randy-ayndy  ranking  rant  rationality  ratty  realness  reason  recent-selection  recommendations  reddit  reference  reflection  regression-to-mean  regularizer  religion  rent-seeking  reputation  review  revolution  rhetoric  right-wing  rigor  rock  roots  rot  russia  s:*  sanctity-degradation  sapiens  scale  scholar  science  science-anxiety  scifi-fantasy  scitariat  search  selection  self-control  self-interest  serene  sexuality  shakespeare  shift  signaling  signum  similarity  social  social-norms  social-science  society  sociology  speaking  spearhead  speculation  spoiler  ssc  stackex  stagnation  status  stirling  stock-flow  stress  study  stylized-facts  subculture  sulla  summary  survey  systematic-ad-hoc  tech  technology  techtariat  telos-atelos  terrorism  texas  the-basilisk  the-bones  the-classics  the-devil  the-great-west-whale  the-south  theos  things  thinking  tidbits  time-series  tip-of-tongue  todo  tools  top-n  toys  track-record  tracker  trade  tradition  trends  tribalism  trivia  troll  trust  truth  tv  twitter  ui  unaffiliated  universalism-particularism  us-them  usa  values  variance-components  video  virtu  visualization  visuo  volo-avolo  von-neumann  vulgar  war  wealth  wealth-of-nations  weird  west-hunter  westminster  white-paper  wiki  wonkish  world  world-war  writing  wtf  X-not-about-Y  yoga  yvain  🌞  🎩  🐸  👽  🤖 

Copy this bookmark:



description:


tags: