21984
Ask HN: Were we more productive 10, 15, or 20 years ago? | Hacker News | https://news.ycombinator.com/
I am super-uber productive. I am lead developer of 3 libraries, and 2 of the 3 flagship products of the facial recognition company I work. My background includes VFX production as a developer and digital artist for 9 major release feature films, lead 3D game console developer for 15 years, and OS developer of the original PlayStation. Through ALL that, I still use the same "make" I used back in the 80's, I hand write my make files, just give me a text editor and a compiler. That is ALL I need, that and to be left alone.

No slack/chat app bullshit, no trying out of tools, just doing the job with the tools I know very well. Delivering early, or over delivering on time, with 100% certainty of what I'm delivering because I know the libs and tool chain from years of experience with them.
productivity  webdevel  frameworks  history  tooling  thewaythingswere 
20 hours ago
How to Get Code into a Docker Container | https://blog.cloud66.com/
<code class="language-bash">
docker run -d -P --name <name of your container> -v /path/to/local/directory:/path/to/container/directory <image name> ...
</code>
docker  devops  sharedvolume  reference 
22 hours ago
c++ - What are these .pch and .ncb files in visual studio? - Stack Overflow | https://stackoverflow.com/
AutoPCH means "automatic precompiled headers" and this directory inside the '.vs' directory can balloon to several hundred megabytes in no time.

The Visual Studio .gitignore from GitHub ignores the whole '.vs' (cache) directory.
visualstudio  ide  cruft  gitignore  solution 
23 hours ago
Best way to convert string to bytes in Python 3? - Stack Overflow | https://stackoverflow.com/
This version seems to work in both Python 2 and 3, with subprocess.check_output, which returns bytes:
<code class="language-bash">
b = mystring.encode('utf-8')
</code>
python  unicode  strings  2to3  bestpractice  solution 
2 days ago
A year on — our experience launching a paid, proprietary product on Linux. | https://blog.hiri.com/
Unsurprisingly, security is a major concern for Linux users. Thankfully, we learned this lesson early after watching several of our competitors getting roasted online for laissez-faire data collection. In many ways, we are lucky that our product is secure by design (we don’t store or process data online — strictly between you and your mail server). None the less, we are very open with users regarding the data we collect, and users can turn off what little data collection we do. Of course, the boundaries are much clearer now thanks to GDPR. Startups are less likely to make privacy related blunders. But if you are creating a product, think twice about using 3rd party services.


Interesting...
The most surprising and delightful aspect of this journey has been the feedback from Linux users. To put it mildly, they care about software. Many of them are software developers themselves. We call it professional sympathy! Their generosity, quality insights and willingness to help us squash bugs have accelerated the pace of our development and learning dramatically. So much so, that if I ever end up building another product, I’ll be going Linux first.
paidsoftware  thisvsthat  nonfree  linux  lessonslearned  email  client  alternativeto  exchange 
5 days ago
Apple iPad Pro review 2018: the fastest iPad is still an iPad - The Verge | https://www.theverge.com/
Apple seems to want it both ways with the iPad Pro: it loves to tout the iPad’s laptop-dwarfing sales figures and industry-leading performance, but when pushed on the iPad’s limitations, the company insists that the iPad is still an ongoing attempt to build the future of computing, not a laptop replacement.

But after eight years, this double-sided argument is no longer tenable. Unlike virtually every other computer, the iPad is a product of Apple’s singular vision: the company designs the display, the processor, the operating system, and the limits of the applications and accessories that plug into it. And after all this time, it’s clear that whatever roadblocks and frustrations exist in using the iPad Pro are there because Apple wants them there. There just aren’t that many excuses left.
ipad  apple  hardware  butwhy  photoshop 
5 days ago
Why desktop apps are coming back – Hiri | https://blog.hiri.com/
I’m really impressed with Figma, and maybe I just need to get over it, but I prefer that Sketch is doing its own thing, in a separate compartment that is not my browser. I like that it asks me if I would like to update rather than force it down my neck like most online SaaS stuff. I like that when I open a file I’m not uploading it to someone else’s server. I like that I feel that I’ve paid for, rather than rented the tool I’m using.

The basic form factor of a PC is the product of natural and obvious evolution. It’s difficult to imagine a PC or laptop being useful without a screen a keyboard and a mouse. And the operating system/desktop app combination is the inevitable consequence of this technology. It has endured because we haven’t found the next step. iPads with keyboards are a just a bad laptop. Web apps are a bad facsimile of desktop apps. They are not the strongest branch in the evolutionary tree that is our interaction with computers.
desktopcomputing  computing  mobile  tabletcomputing  desktopapps  webapps 
5 days ago
16.04 - /usr/sbin/fanctl: No such file or directory in /etc/network/if-up.d/ubuntu-fan" - Ask Ubuntu | https://askubuntu.com/
Not sure if this fixed anything (or broke Docker), but at least `ifup` works now without bombing with error code 127.
I had this happen after I installed and later removed Docker. The Docker daemon depends on FAN so it gets installed, but if you don't purge it upon removal the startup script in /etc/network/if-up.d/ sticks around. Remove it with apt remove --purge ubuntu-fan.
docker  networking  ubuntu  elementary  errormessage  maybesolution 
5 days ago
Bash Reference Manual: Command Grouping | https://www.gnu.org/
You have to include a final semicolon to do something like this

<code class="language-bash">
test -f "$1" || { echo "ACK! Can't open '$1'"; return 1; }
</code>
unix  linux  bash  shellscripting  solution  fuckina 
6 days ago
email - Can you use Davmail to access Exchange archives? - Stack Overflow | https://stackoverflow.com/
Solution: https://stackoverflow.com/a/53660862/785213

Best option (suggested here: https://sourceforge.net/p/davmail/support-requests/134/#bf94) is to set the "Public (shared)" path in the server advanced settings to "/archive".

IF you create a new account and set the IMAP root to /archive and it mostly works. This might require creating a second account in Thunderbird, and aliasing something like 'localhorst' to 'localhost' in /etc/hosts so that Thunderbird doesn't complain about there being duplicate incoming servers.
exchange  owa  davmail  thunderbird  email  outlook  onlinearchive  personalarchive  solution  fuckina 
6 days ago
The Biases That Punish Racially Diverse Teams | https://hbr.org/
One possibility for this failure is that the purported benefits of diversity are more hype than reality, but that’s unlikely given the ample research that speaks against this claim. Racially diverse groups of jurors exchange a wider range of information during deliberations than racially homogeneous groups, for example. Diverse groups of traders are less likely to make inaccurate judgments when trading stocks. Gender diversity in top management teams improves firm performance, especially when innovation is a strategic focus. And our own past research helped establish the fact that the mere presence of diversity can lead groups to work harder, share unique perspectives, be more open to new ideas, and perform better, especially when groups need to share information and resolve differences of opinion.

The findings were striking. When reading a transcript with pictures revealing the group’s composition, racially diverse teams were perceived as having more relationship conflict than homogeneous ones. And they were less likely to receive additional resources because of these biased perceptions of conflict — even though the objective content of the group interaction was exactly the same.

Diverse groups were perceived as having more relationship conflict, and because of this, financial resources were less likely to be given to them than to homogeneous groups. The diverse groups were handicapped, potentially derailing future success.

So what can organizations do to combat this bias against diverse groups? At a basic level, an important first step is to cultivate an awareness of this bias in those responsible for evaluating diverse teams. [...]

Second, managers should rely upon clear standards of performance set before — not during — group observation instead of making performance and resource determinations in the middle of the process. [...]

Finally, a little advice for the diverse teams themselves: You have to play offense and ensure that managers see and value when things are going smoothly on the team.
teamwork  collaboration  diversity  multiculturalism  bias  racialbais  management 
7 days ago
Diverse Teams Feel Less Comfortable — and That’s Why They Perform Better | https://hbr.org/
Via: "To Pair or Not to Pair: Pair Programming" - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u_eZ-ae2FY8
With so much at stake, why aren’t these companies making more headway? One reason could be that, despite the evidence about their results, homogenous teams just feel more effective. In addition, people believe that diverse teams breed greater conflict than they actually do. Bringing these biases to light may enable ways to combat them.
After collectively naming their suspect, members individually rated aspects of the discussion. More diverse groups — those joined by someone from outside their own fraternity or sorority — judged the team interactions to be less effective than did groups joined by insiders. They were also less confident in their final decisions.

Intuitively, this makes sense: On a homogenous team, people readily understand each other and collaboration flows smoothly, giving the sensation of progress. Dealing with outsiders causes friction, which feels counterproductive.

But in this case their judgments were starkly wrong. Among groups where all three original members didn’t already know the correct answer, adding an outsider versus an insider actually doubled their chance of arriving at the correct solution, from 29% to 60%. The work felt harder, but the outcomes were better.

In fact, working on diverse teams produces better outcomes precisely because it’s harder.
This idea goes against many people’s intuitions. There’s a common bias that psychologists call the fluency heuristic: We prefer information that is processed more easily, or fluently, judging it to be truer or more beautiful. The effect partially explains that we gain greater appreciation of songs or paintings when they become familiar because they’re more easily processed. The fluency heuristic leads many people to study incorrectly; they often simply reread the material. The information becomes more familiar without much effort, and so they feel that they’re learning. But in a 2011 study students performed better on a test after studying the text once and then trying to recall as much as they could, a strenuous task, than they did by repeatedly going over the text, even though they predicted that rereading was the key to learning. Similarly, confronting opinions you disagree with might not seem like the quickest path to getting things done, but working in groups can be like studying (or exercising): no pain, no gain.
In one study MBA students were asked to imagine that they were comanaging several four-person teams of interns, and that one team had asked for additional resources. They saw photos of the members, depicting four white men, four black men, or two of each. They then read a transcript of a discussion among the group and rated the team on various factors. Teams of four white men and four black men were seen as having equal levels of relationship conflict, but the diverse teams were seen as having more relationship conflict than the homogeneous teams, even though everyone had read the same transcript.
For example, research suggests that when people with different perspectives are brought together, people may seek to gloss over those differences in the interest of group harmony — when, in fact, differences should actually be taken seriously and highlighted. In a 2012 study teams of three were tasked with generating a creative business plan for a theater. On some teams, members were assigned distinct roles (Artistic, Event, and Finance Manager), thus increasing diversity of viewpoints. These teams came up with better ideas than homogeneous teams — but only if they’d been explicitly told to try to take the perspectives of their teammates. They had to face up to their differences in order to benefit from them.
Another way to take advantage of differing viewpoints is to highlight the value of multiculturalism. One 2009 study looked at support for multiculturalism versus colorblindness in nearly 4,000 employees in 18 work units at a large U.S. health care firm. The more that workers agreed that “employees should recognize and celebrate racial and ethnic differences” and the more they disagreed that “employees should downplay their racial and ethnic differences,” the more that minorities in those units reported feeling engaged in their work. In another 2009 study, pairs of students, one white and one Aboriginal Canadian, were teamed up for a conversation. Prefacing the meeting with a message supporting multiculturalism (versus no message) made the meeting more positive, while a message endorsing colorblindness led whites to turn negative toward their minority partners.
teamwork  diversity  cognitivebias  bias  pairing  pairprogramming  groupthink  fluencyheuristic  nopainnogain  multiculturalism 
7 days ago
The Shame of Pair Programming | Diary of a ScrumMaster | https://diaryofascrummaster.wordpress.com/
To pair requires vulnerability. It means sharing all that you know and all that you don’t know. This is hard for us. Programmers are supposed to be smart, really-crazy-smart. Most people look at what we do and say “I could never do that.” It makes us feel a bit special, gives us a sense of pride and pride creates invulnerability. I often hear stories that infer “I’ll just go and do some magic and if it takes a long time you can bet I made miracles happen”.

When done well, the shame of pairing quickly evaporates. As you start to realise that, between the stuff you know and the stuff they know, you can be twice as good; pairing becomes joyous. Together we find solutions that would be out of reach if we were alone.

Also, a shout-out to Brené Brown:
It’s hard. Pairing well takes empathy, empathy evaporates shame, allowing courage. As Brené Brown says “Vulnerability is the birthplace of Innovation, Creativity and Change”
pairing  pride  collaboration  devel  programming  pairprogramming  vulnerability 
7 days ago
To Pair or Not to Pair: Pair Programming - YouTube | https://www.youtube.com/
Lady's from ThoughtWorks (https://www.thoughtworks.com/), and if that's sounds familiar, that's because they're the Selenium and GoCD people.

Benefits mentioned in the video:
1. knowledge sharing (1 + 1 > 2)
2. combines two modes of thinking: tactical (driver: local optimization), strategic (navigator: big picture)
3. reflection (on the story, value-added, effectiveness vs. # of LOC)
4. helps coder / team focus; discipline around structure of code, strategy, explain and justify choices, avoid rabbit holes
5. "I get more programming productivity" out of reducing time that I'm stuck than from increasing my speed when I'm not stuck."
6. helps practice "true" CI--code review on-the-go; more collective code ownership; >> trunk-based development

Tips:
1. don't do it for 8 hours a day
2. take breaks; it's exhausting
3. even skill levels
4. share feedback (I don't like it when ...), exchange READMEs
5. "the shame of pair programming"; requires vulnerability

Homogeneous teams feel easier, but easy is bad for performance. (ref: https://hbr.org/2016/09/diverse-teams-feel-less-comfortable-and-thats-why-they-perform-better)

The authors are saying that this idea goes against many people's intuition, and often if there's something counter-intuitive, there's a cognitive bias hidden away somewhere, right?

And the one that they're mentioning here is the "fluency heuristic," which says that we prefer information that is more easily processed, and if it's easily-processed, we think that it's more true, more right, more beautiful, and that serves us very well in a lot of situations in software development. We want readable code, easily-processable things. But I don't think that it serves us well if we think that's why we're not doing pair programming.

So, pairing feels hard, but that doesn't mean that it's not good for performance, and also it doesn't have to stay hard.

Ways to make it easier (reduce friction, conflict, anxiety):
1. get the talking going
2. active listening
3. friendly feedback
4. answer why

See also: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S92vVAEofes
agile  cs  programming  pairing  pairprogramming  teamwork  collaboration  communication  conference  talk  video 
7 days ago
sh - Check if a file exists with wildcard in shell script - Stack Overflow | https://stackoverflow.com/
You can do the following:
<code class="language-bash">
set -- xorg-x11-fonts*
if [ -f "$1" ]; then
printf "BLAH"
fi
</code>

This works with sh and derivates: ksh and bash. It doesn't create any sub-shell. $(..)and `...` commands create a sub-shell : they fork a process, and they are inefficient. Of course it works with several files, and this solution can be the fastest, or second to the fastest one.

It works too when there's no matches. There isn't need to use nullglob as one of the comentatators say. $1 will contain the origintal test name, therefore the test -f $1 won't success, because the $1 file doesn't exist.
bash  glob  wildcard  pitfall  gotcha  workaround  solution 
7 days ago
« earlier      
acf addon addressbook advice alternativeto america android animation annoyance apache api app apple applescript art article audio authentication automation backupandrecovery bash bestpractices bioinformatics blog browser bug by:20gnd c calendar centos chrome cli cloudstorage collaboration comic commandline configfile console cplusplus crossplatform cs css culture cycling dammitbrain database dba debian debugging design devel disasterrecovery documentation driver dropbox editor education email employment encryption errormessage essential extension eyecandy favorite filemanagement filesystem film firefox flask framework freeware from:twitter fuckina funny git github gmail gnome google graphics gui hacking hardware health history hosting howto html html5 humor icons ide imageprocessing inspiration installation interesting ios iphone java javascript jquery keyboard language latex ldap learning library linux list lists mac markdown math matlab maybesolution mediawiki mobile movein mozilla music mysql mystuff needshelp networking newbie news nonfree opensource osx packagemanagement pdf perl photography php plugin politics printing privacy productivity programming projectstowatch python rails reference research ruby samplecode science scm script scripting searchandindex searchengine security service shell shellscripting socialmedia software solution ssh storage syntaxhighlighting sysadmin systemmonitoring terminal testing textprocessing thefuture theme thewaythingswere thunderbird tipsandtricks todo toolchain troubleshooting tutorial ubuntu ui unix utility versioncontrol via:ifttt video vim visualization watchthisspace web webapp webapps webdesign webdevel webmaster wiki win7 windows wishlist wordpress work writing x11

Copy this bookmark:



description:


tags: