The Macron delusion - spiked
This aloof style of policymaking is also reflected in Macron’s behaviour. Many in France see the president, an Énarque (France’s equivalent to an Oxbridge graduate) and former Rothschild banker, as dismissive of the concerns of ordinary voters. When a pensioner told the president that he only had a small pension, which would be shaved further by Macron’s reforms, Macron responded that France would be better off if people like him just stopped complaining.
france  politics 
58 minutes ago
French universities to lure foreign students with more English courses - France 24
More French classes will also be on offer for foreign students and student visa applications will be made available online...
From March 2019, foreign graduates with a French master's degree will be able to get a residence visa to look for work or set up a business in France.

"We are constantly compared, audited, judged among 10 other possible destinations. In an age of social media, no one can rest on its reputation only," Philippe said.

French officials said current fees of around €170 ($195) a year for a bachelor's degree in France or €243 for a master's – the same as those paid by French students – were interpreted by students in countries like China as a sign of low quality.

From September 2019, non-European students will be charged €2,770 annually to study for a bachelor's degree and €3,770 a year for a master's and PhDs.
france  education  work  english  enfr 
6 hours ago
Twitter
RT : Je m'explique. L'action de ces échappe aux politiques et marque une défiance à l'égard des médias. L…
giletsjaunes  from twitter
7 hours ago
Twitter
RT : ...si ces malversations avaient eu lieu en France, la loi sur le "secret des affaires" auraient probablement permis…
from twitter
7 hours ago
Blogging for business: five questions to ask before you start
This sounds so basic as to be not worth stating, but it’s really critical. What is your objective?

To have an outlet for your thoughts on some aspect of the language professions
To connect and discuss with other people in the language professions
To attract potential clients
To establish yourself as an authority about some aspect of the language professions
Something else entirely

It’s impossible to over-stress how important this is. Without a goal, it’s not worth starting a professional blog in the first place.
blogs  translation  business 
7 hours ago
Don’t blame the Irish: the Brexit chaos is all about England | Fintan O’Toole | Opinion | The Guardian
It is a new thing: the first time in 800 years of Anglo-Irish relations that Ireland has had more clout. No wonder the Brexiters and the British government found it impossible for so long to even recognise this new reality. They operated – and some of them continue to operate – under the old rules, in which the game would be settled between the big powers, and the interests of a small country such as Ireland could be easily shoved aside. The Irish would get a few platitudes about peace but the real deal would be done between London and Berlin...
Yet it has not been like that. In part, this is because of simple arithmetic: Ireland is not isolated, it is part of a bloc of 27 states. There is a basic lesson here for the Brexiters: even a very small country inside the EU has more influence than a much larger country on the outside. In part, too, it is because of basic statecraft. The Irish government and diplomatic service, backed by a near-unanimous consensus in the Dublin parliament, had a very clear sense of where Ireland’s vital national interest lay, and hence of what they needed to achieve.
ireland  eu  uk  politics  Brexit 
13 hours ago
High score, low pay: why the gig economy loves gamification | Business | The Guardian
But that apparent freedom poses a unique challenge to the platforms’ need to provide reliable, “on demand” service to their riders – and so a driver’s freedom has to be aggressively, if subtly, managed. One of the main ways these companies have sought to do this is through the use of gamification.
A driver displaying Lyft and Uber stickers on his windscreen in Los Angeles.

Simply defined, gamification is the use of game elements – point-scoring, levels, competition with others, measurable evidence of accomplishment, ratings and rules of play – in non-game contexts. Games deliver an instantaneous, visceral experience of success and reward, and they are increasingly used in the workplace to promote emotional engagement with the work process, to increase workers’ psychological investment in completing otherwise uninspiring tasks, and to influence, or “nudge”, workers’ behaviour. This is what my weekly feedback summary, my starred ratings and other gamified features of the Lyft app did.
work  driving 
14 hours ago
Diesel : Renault soupçonné d’enfumage à grande échelle - Libération
Cook your emissions tests ( ) nothing much happens—tho air pollution…
from twitter
yesterday
Twitter
Cook your emissions tests ( ) nothing much happens—tho air pollution…
from twitter
yesterday
Twitter
“We are ..sure that it is ..traffic speed that is ..the problem. Our evidence for that is that there is a direct co…
from twitter_favs
yesterday
Twitter
Très content pour trouver le mémoire de Jacques Chirac dans une boîte d'échange des livres à Surgères (17). Voilà l…
from twitter
2 days ago
velofou: Enfilé avec mon gilet
Effusion: En Charente Maritime avec les gilets jaunes :
from twitter
3 days ago
Twitter
Manif des à Tonnay-Charente ce matin. J'ai vu un conducteur arrêté par la police suite d'une confront…
GiletsJaunes  from twitter
3 days ago
Twitter
See the shocked BBC reaction to the idea of reviewing the non-London press (this is from 2016).
"We p…
from twitter_favs
3 days ago
Twitter
Même avec un vélo classique je prends la chaussée là : la piste évidemment trop étroite pour confort en…
from twitter
4 days ago
Twitter
RT : Once the idea of companies 'fitting' their workers with microchips would have been the basis for a dystopian novel.…
from twitter
4 days ago
Twitter
If you wear a helmet you give away your right to a safe environment for cycling. You participate in…
from twitter_favs
5 days ago
Twitter
The helmet debate is not really relevant to the real issue and should be left to personal choice Th…
from twitter_favs
5 days ago
Media Lens - The Filter Bubble - Owen Jones And Con Coughlin
'Owen, we absolutely loved your thread exposing Con Coughlin. But what happened to the promised Guardian article on this? I'm asking because you told us you were writing something on Oct 17. The piece then came out a week later on Oct 24 with almost all the meat missing. Did you run into internal opposition at the Guardian?' (Direct message, Twitter, November 8, 2018)

We received no reply. Jones, of course, is not about to reveal what happened to his article. Perhaps the Guardian editors simply published what he submitted. One thing is clear: somehow, at some point, the filter bubble worked its magic and prevented a damning expose of a senior UK journalist reaching the Guardian's readers.
journalism  uk  iraq  attention  agnotology 
5 days ago
Twitter
What keeps people cycling safe is calmed and tamed traffic on minor roads and stre…
from twitter_favs
5 days ago
The Earth is in a death spiral. It will take radical action to save us | George Monbiot | Opinion | The Guardian
The problem is political. A fascinating analysis by the social science professor Kevin MacKay contends that oligarchy has been a more fundamental cause of the collapse of civilisations than social complexity or energy demand. Control by oligarchs, he argues, thwarts rational decision-making, because the short-term interests of the elite are radically different to the long-term interests of society. This explains why past civilisations have collapsed “despite possessing the cultural and technological know-how needed to resolve their crises”. Economic elites, which benefit from social dysfunction, block the necessary solutions.
economics  climatechange  politics 
6 days ago
How to avoid losing your memory in the digital age | Science | The Guardian
The most common technique used by memory athletes is the “method of loci”, better known to fans of the TV series Sherlock as the “memory palace”. The idea is that when memorising a list – such as a to-do list – you associate an image with every item on it. The images, which can be as absurd as you like, are then placed in the rooms in your “palace”, which will typically be your home or another familiar building. To recall the list, you imagine walking from one room to the next.

Katie Kermode, from Cheshire, holds two world records: for memorising 105 names and faces in five minutes and for memorising 318 random words in 15 minutes. “I have a journey that goes around my house and other houses I have lived in,” she says. “I put two words in each room and I just associate those two words in a visual way. Then I walk back in my head through the different routes and I remember which words I saw.”
memory  psychology  sport 
6 days ago
Katharine Viner: 'The Guardian's reader funding model is working. It's inspiring' | Membership | The Guardian
To be able to announce today that we have received financial support from more than 1 million readers around the world in the last three years is such a significant step. This model of being funded by our readers through voluntary contributions, subscriptions to the Guardian, the Observer and Guardian Weekly, membership or as part of our patrons programme is working.

This means that within just three years, the Guardian is on a path to being sustainable. We hope to break even by April 2019. It has not been easy and we still have a long way to go – we need you to continue to support us financially, and we need more of our readers to take that step if they can. We continue to face financial challenges, but we are determined to find new ways to make meaningful journalism thrive – and with your help it will.
journalism  guardian  news  newspapers  finance  business 
6 days ago
Merkel joins Macron in calling for a ‘real, true European army’ | World news | The Guardian
Solidarity also required a commitment to the rule of law, she said, a coded reference to member states, such as Poland and Hungary, that stand accused by the EU institutions of backsliding on democratic values.

She was speaking shortly after Romania was given an unusually strong rebuke by the commission for “backtracking” on the fight against corruption and the creation of fully independent judiciary.

One of the EU’s newest member states, Romania has been on the EU’s critical list, since new laws changing the judiciary and abolishing some anti-corruption offences were introduced last winter, sparking mass street protests.
eu  law  romania 
6 days ago
Contre la pollution, la ZTL, solution des villes italiennes | L'interconnexion n'est plus assurée
La ZTL italienne, injustement méconnue. Il existe un autre outil, beaucoup trop méconnu en France, qui permet de sélectionner les automobiles non pas en fonction de leur niveau de pollution, mais de leur usage. Ce sont les zones à trafic limité (ZTL), instaurées dans pratiquement toutes les villes d’Italie, des plus grandes aux plus petites. Si chaque pays dispose de son organisation ad hoc, dont l’Ademe a établi un inventaire, celle qui prévaut en Italie présente de nombreux avantages.
driving  transport  urban  italy 
6 days ago
Twitter
RT : A nightmare version of 'news' is maintained by a corporate 'filter bubble' that blocks facts, ideas and sources tha…
from twitter
6 days ago
PsyArXiv Preprints | Bicycle helmet wearing is associated with closer overtaking by drivers: A response to Olivier and Walter, 2013
There is a body of research on how driver behaviour might change in response to bicyclists’ appearance. In 2007, Walker published a study suggesting motorists drove closer on average when passing a bicyclist if the rider wore a helmet, potentially increasing the risk of a collision. Olivier and Walter re-analysed the same data in 2013 and claimed helmet wearing was not associated with close vehicle passing. Here we show how Olivier and Walter’s analysis addressed a subtly, but importantly, different question than Walker’s. Their conclusion was based on omitting information about variability in driver behaviour and instead dividing overtakes into two binary categories of ‘close’ and ‘not close’; we demonstrate that they did not justify or address the implications of this choice, did not have sufficient statistical power for their approach, and moreover show that slightly adjusting their definition of ‘close’ would reverse their conclusions. We then present a new analysis of the original dataset, measuring directly the extent to which drivers changed their behaviour in response to helmet wearing. This analysis confirms that drivers did, overall, get closer when the rider wore a helmet.
helmetwars  psychology  driving  cycling 
6 days ago
There is no version of Brexit which will benefit the NHS—only varying degrees of harm - The BMJ
It is likely that there will be provision for doctors and nurses coming to the UK after Brexit, albeit at extra cost and bureaucracy, if the government—as it has indicated—follows the guidance of the Migration Advisory Committee. But the effect on the social care workforce and those who rely on them for care will be particularly significant because of the salary threshold of £30,000.

Just over 5% of the regulated nursing profession, 16% of dentists, 5% of allied health professionals, and around 9% of doctors are from elsewhere within the EEA. We cannot afford to lose or further demoralise those who have given so much to our health service. That so many colleagues now feel unwelcome, as a result of the divisive and xenophobic rhetoric of the last campaign, shames us all.
Brexit  uk  medicine  politics 
6 days ago
London Calling Brexit: How the rest of the UK views the capital | LSE BREXIT
Firstly, there is the question of overall pride in the capital. Leavers were less likely to express pride in London as capital city of the UK than Remain voters. However, for both groups, a majority of people still said that they were proud of London as a capital. This included 51 per cent in the North of England, and an average of 59% across England only. So whilst there are differences in opinion along Brexit lines, these are far from terminal.
Brexit  London  uk  politics 
6 days ago
Twitter
RT : Sadly, in her rush to placate the far-right wing of the Tory party, she did sell her soul to the Brexitremist devil…
from twitter
6 days ago
Décès d'une cycliste encastrée sous un poids lourd à Toulouse - 13/11/2018 - ladepeche.fr
Une collision entre un poids lourd et une cycliste s'est produite, peu après 14 heures, en ce mardi après-midi devant le Palais de justice, allée Jules-Guesde à Toulouse. L'accident s'est déroulé sous les yeux des gendarmes de Saint-Michel qui ont aussitôt donné l'alerte et sécurisé les lieux pour les autres usagers de la route en attendant les secours.

Une femme, qui était coincée sous le poids lourd, n'a pas survécu à ses blessures. Elle était âgée de 35 ans.
cycling  crash_report 
7 days ago
Twitter
And Nige got owned today in the European Parliament about not wanting to be part of a German run EU whil…
from twitter_favs
7 days ago
About The Lens
The Lens is building an open platform for Innovation Cartography. Specifically, the Lens serves nearly all of the patent documents in the world as open, annotatable digital public goods that are integrated with scholarly and technical literature along with regulatory and business data. The Lens will allow document collections, aggregations, and analyses to be shared, annotated, and embedded to forge open mapping of the world of knowledge-directed innovation. Ultimately, this will restore the role of the patent system as a teaching resource to inspire and inform entrepreneurs, citizens and policy makers.

Within the next two years, we expect to host over 95% of the world's patent information and link to most of the scholarly literature, creating open public innovation portfolios of individuals and institutions. Using all open source components, we are working to create open schemas by which patent documents can be used to teach and communicate, rather than confuse and intimidate.
open  patents  sciencepublishing 
7 days ago
5 Great Tips To Manage Your Google (& Android) Contacts
Google Contacts expand far beyond their use in Gmail. They return in Google Docs and can even be synchronized with an Android handset.

When you first start using it though, your contact list will be unorganized and mighty confusing, with missing, superfluous and duplicate contacts.

If you want a tidy address book, be it in Gmail or on your Android phone, you’ve got some work ahead. Below are five great tips to fight off this insurmountable mountain of contacts. Armed with these, managing your comments will be a walk in the park.
android  tools 
7 days ago
Untitled (https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/sad-design-out-april-2019-geert-lovink)
Last week I submitted the manuscript of my new book Sad by Design--On Platform Nihilism, out in April in Eng.& It.
from twitter_favs
7 days ago
Twitter
If motorist stop jumping red lights cyclists would have more underst…
from twitter_favs
8 days ago
Twitter
Dutch road safety poster. Roughly, "don't drive too fast - check your speed regularly".
The nice detail here is how…
from twitter_favs
8 days ago
Twitter
RT : 1) & "understanding leaver's concerns" - thread

As we prepare for a there's been discussion o…
PeoplesVote  Brexit  from twitter
9 days ago
Super recognisers: the people who never forget a face | UK news | The Guardian
Russell’s paper was the first to introduce super recognisers to the world, and only a handful of papers have been written since. Academic study is not yet a decade old, and the research, though exciting, is limited. Evidence suggests the ability might be genetic – that this skill is hard-wired, somehow, within 1-2% of the population. But nobody really knows how a super recogniser does what he or she does. When I asked Pope to explain his process, he said: “It’s strange how it works,” and “there’s no system.” He waved a finger around his head, then shrugged.

That so little is known about super recognition makes police deployment controversial. Academics advise caution, which is presumably why forces are reluctant to define super recognition as science.
police  psychology 
9 days ago
Without a fair tax on tech, it could be the end of the state as we know it | John Harris | Opinion | The Guardian
The upshot is obvious: while big tech is reshaping societies and economies at speed – think of what Amazon is doing to our high streets or, looking ahead, the huge disruption that could be sown by driverless transport – it gives woefully inadequate financial help to the governments whose job it is to manage the fallout. The problem is compounded by the fact that, almost by definition, tech companies do not spread their wealth via employment – and, as consequence, income tax – to anything like the extent that traditional firms once did.
...
The beginnings of an answer might lie in what economists call a unitary tax. In this model, firms would be obliged to give the tax authorities of any country in which they operate both a set of accounts for their global activities and information about their physical assets, workforce, sales and profits for the territory in question. Tax would then be decided using a formula based on these factors. Some state taxes in the US work on a comparable basis, and the European commission has made supportive noises about the concept.
tax  TaxesAreForLittlePeople 
9 days ago
First British Soldier Killed In Action During WW1 Was Reconnaissance Cyclist
He was a reconnaissance cyclist in the 4th battalion of the Middlesex regiment. There were a great many cyclist casualties during the First World War because there were a number of cycling regiments, including the London Cycle Corps, the 26th Middlesex battalion and the 8th (Cyclist) Battalion of the Essex Regiment. Personnel from Britain's Automobile Association (AA) made up two companies of this last regiment...

One of the cyclist dispatch riders used by the German army was Adolf Hitler. As shown by his military records he was a bicycle messenger during the First World War. The records says he was a “radfahrer,” a cyclist. If he had been a motorcycle messenger his records would have stated he was a “Kradfahrer.”

The 25-year-old Hitler was a bicycle messenger for a Bavarian regiment, taking messages to the fighting units from the command staff. He was always keen to volunteer for dangerous assignments and – sadly, for later world history – he led a largely charmed cycling life, avoiding death on numerous occasions.
cycling  history 
9 days ago
Twitter
RT : 25 years ago today the first major web browser was released: Mosaic 1.0.
todayintech  otd  from twitter
9 days ago
Twitter
The story of Private Parr, who was a reconnaissance cyclist and the first recorded British soldier to die during WW…
from twitter_favs
9 days ago
Twitter
RT : The study found that the world’s seven major industrial democracies spent at least $100 billion a year to prop up o…
from twitter
9 days ago
Pretentious, impenetrable, hard work ... better? Why we need difficult books | Books | The Guardian
It’s sometimes fuzzily said that literary fiction gives you more on rereading, or that it stays with you, or that it’s “more profound”. That may be true, some of the time – but these things are more likely to be symptoms than necessary features. I’d suggest that the main identifying feature – and in this respect literary writing can and does compass and mingle with any number of other genres – is to do with complexity and depth of attention. That can be moral or psychological complexity – crudely, the goodies and baddies are less clearly delineated – but it can also be, and tends to be in the best work, allied to a greater attention to the form and to the sentence-by-sentence language itself. And where I say that it mingles with other genres, the point I mean to make is that (just like hats, or nanobots) its features can be found in any genre. You could make the case that Iain M Banks’s Culture novels are literary SF, that Sarah Waters has written literary historical thrillers, that Joseph Kanon or John le Carré write literary spy novels, that the metafictional quality of The Murder of Roger Ackroyd is a literary quality, and so on. The examples are numberless.

A publishing acquaintance suggests an analogy with music: jazz is more complex than blues. It’s harder to play and harder to appreciate. That doesn’t mean there isn’t lots of good blues and lots of bad jazz. It doesn’t mean that jazz is an innately superior artform. It simply describes a formal difference between the two. Likewise, when we talk about a “literary novel” we usually mean something that demands and rewards close attention – though, as ever, there will be exceptions.
writing  literature 
10 days ago
Twitter
David Cameron calling a referendum to solve divisions within the Tories
from twitter_favs
10 days ago
Twitter
RT : Classic car-centric design. Just look at the size of it! A left turn on that thing'll add about 50m t…
from twitter
10 days ago
Dutch man, 69, starts legal fight to identify as 20 years younger | World news | The Guardian
A 69-year-old Dutch “positivity guru” who says he does not feel his age has started a battle to make himself legally 20 years younger on the grounds that he is being discriminated against on a dating app.

Emile Ratelband told a court in Arnhem in the Netherlands that he did not feel “comfortable” with his date of birth, and compared his wish to alter it to people who identified as transgender.

Ratelband said that due to having an official age that did not reflect his emotional state he was struggling to find both work and love. He has asked for his date of birth to be changed from 11 March 1949 to 11 March 1969.

“When I’m 69, I am limited. If I’m 49, then I can buy a new house, drive a different car,” he said. “I can take up more work. When I’m on Tinder and it says I’m 69, I don’t get an answer. When I’m 49, with the face I have, I will be in a luxurious position.”
sex  funny  ageing  law 
10 days ago
Hellfire: this is what our future looks like under climate change | World news | The Guardian
ildfire scientists bridle at the term “fire tornado”; they prefer “fire whirl”, but “fire whirl” seems inadequate to describe something that built its own weather system seven miles high. In 1978, meteorologist David Goens devised a classification system that placed fire whirls of this magnitude in the “fire storm” category, along with the caveat that: “This is a rare phenomenon and hopefully one that is so unlikely in the forest environment that it can be disregarded.”

This was 40 years ago. So what has changed?

For one, the addition of a new verb to the wildfire lexicon. “Natural fire never did this,” explained Gyves. “It shouldn’t moonscape.” But now it does. It is alarming to consider that this annihilating energy arrived out of thin air, born of fire and fanned by an increasingly common combination of triple-digit heat, single-digit humidity, high fuel loads, dying trees and the battling winds that swirl daily through the mountains and valleys all over California and the greater west.

Natural fire never did this, it shouldn't moonscape
Captain Dusty Gyves

That this phenomenon may represent something new under the sun has become a subject of earnest debate among fire scientists and meteorologists. The only other event that comes close is a full-blown tornado that occurred in conjunction with the notorious Canberra bushfires of 2003. With the exception of the Hamburg firestorm, ignited when Allied bombers dropped thousands of tons of incendiaries on that German city in 1943, there is no record of a “pyronado” of this magnitude occurring anywhere on earth.
climate 
10 days ago
In the balance: scientists vote on first change to kilogram in a century | Science | The Guardian
“If aliens ever visit Earth what else would we talk about other than physics?” said Schlamminger. “If we want to talk about physics we have to agree on a set of units, but if we say our unit of mass is based on a lump of metal we keep in Paris, we’ll be the laughing stock of the universe.”

If the vote proceeds as expected, Earth will be spared such galactic shame. Since 1983, the metre has been derived from the speed of light in a vacuum. The kilogram makeover will derive mass from the Planck constant, a number deeply rooted in the quantum world. It describes the size of bundles of energy, known as quanta, which pour out of a hot oven, for example.
science 
11 days ago
Half of white women continue to vote Republican. What's wrong with them? | Moira Donegan | Opinion | The Guardian
But there is something else at play, something more complicated, in white women’s relationship to white patriarchy. White women’s identity places them in a curious position at the intersection of two vectors of privilege and oppression: they are granted structural power by their race, but excluded from it by their sex. In a political system where racism and sexism are both so deeply ingrained, white women must choose to be loyal to either the more powerful aspect of their identity, their race, or to the less powerful, their sex. Some Republican white women might lean into racism not only for racism’s sake, but also as a means of avoiding or denying the realities of how sexist oppression makes them vulnerable.

In her book Right Wing Women, the feminist Andrea Dworkin wrote that conservative women often conform to the dominant ideologies of the men around them as part of a subconscious survival strategy, hoping that their conservatism will spare them from male hatred and violence.
racism  feminism  politics  us  authoritarianism 
11 days ago
'Phenomenally saddening': inside the sordid world of America's for-profit colleges | Film | The Guardian
The rerouting of financial aid money from institutions to students themselves was meant to allow private universities to compete with public ones, whose low costs made enrollment swell. But this opened the door for profit-driven colleges, who took advantage of the desire to make higher education more inclusive by encouraging students to take out huge sums of financial aid money...
These companies promised students eventual employment and, since the money was coming from taxpayers, had no vested interest in whether or not the students could pay back their loans. As an expert says in Fail State, for-profits had what amounted to risk-free access to the US treasury. Predictably, default rates soared in the 1980s, with almost half of all students at these colleges defaulting on their loans. By 1992, however, lawmakers began to wise up to the predatory recruitment practices and the virtually useless degrees these colleges were offering students.

At the time, a series of congressional hearings, and the attention of Congresswoman Maxine Waters (who appears in the documentary), helped set in motion a series of provisions that would allow for oversight of the for-profit industry: the 85-15 rule, requiring that at least 15% of the companies’ revenue came from sources other than government student aid; the 50/50 rule, ensuring no more than half of college courses were offered online or by mail; and the incentive compensation rule, banning college recruiters from receiving bonuses based on how many students they lured to the program. In the following decade, though, congressional interest in policing the for-profit sector waned and many of these regulations were dismantled or otherwise softened.
education  us 
11 days ago
We need to talk about cars - Spacing Toronto
RT : The earth’s air is warming, and so are its oceans. We know what we have to do.
from twitter
11 days ago
Twitter
RT : Yes it really does hurt. Six cyclists hospitalized in just two years…
from twitter
11 days ago
Twitter
Mid-20th century coinage reflecting shift for "man pays (for woman)" to "man and woman spli…
from twitter
11 days ago
Belgique: À 80 kilomètres du Nord, la centrale nucléaire de Tihange 1 est «vétuste et dangereuse»
« Tihange 1 est l’une des plus anciennes centrales au monde. Elle a été conçue sur base de principes de sûreté en vigueur au début des années 70 », a pointé M. Mertins. « Les accidents survenus depuis lors à Three Mile Island, Tchernobyl et Fukushima ont démontré qu’une hausse significative des exigences en la matière était nécessaire », a-t-il poursuivi, déplorant à ce titre les nombreux manquements qu’il a constatés à la centrale belge.
nukes  europe  safety 
11 days ago
Twitter
RT : “Banning cars in major cities would rapidly improve millions of lives” | via
from twitter
11 days ago
Banning cars in major cities would rapidly improve millions of lives | New Scientist
RT : “Banning cars in major cities would rapidly improve millions of lives” | via
from twitter
11 days ago
Media Lens - How To Be A Reliable ‘Mainstream’ Journalist
There are certain rules you need to follow as a journalist if you are going to demonstrate to your editors, and the media owners who employ you, that you can be trusted.

For example, if you write about US-Iran relations, you need to ensure that your history book starts in 1979.
journalism  politics  international 
11 days ago
Do Not Let Criminals Steal Your Cellphone Number With This Scam | Inc.com
Because it works - and, if they can steal your number, it does not matter how much security software you have on your phone - they gain access to your texts, calls, and more. It does not matter if you use an iPhone or Android or something else - stealing your number circumvents not only the security on your device, but also the second factor authentication texts that are so commonly used for improved security by banks, social media companies, Google, etc. They can also send texts as you - likely allowing them to scam some of your friends and relatives into installing malware by sending some link to be clicked, or even into sending them money to deal with an emergency situation.
security  telephony 
12 days ago
Twitter
RT : Dominic Raab: "I hadn't quite understood the full extent of this but... we're particularly reliant on the Dover-Cal…
from twitter
12 days ago
Twitter
I agree the greenhouse effect is not difficult to understand. Nor is it difficult to imagi…
from twitter
13 days ago
Un chantier hors norme sur la ligne SNCF Nantes-Clisson-La-Roche-sur-Yon en 2019
C'est vertigineux. Et le défi, c'est de faire tout ça sans dépenser trop et en gênant le moins possible la circulation des trains. Les travaux vont donc avoir lieu de jour et en semaine entre Clisson et La-Roche-sur-Yon (ce qui va permettre d'économiser 15 millions d'euros par rapport à des travaux de nuit). C'est là que ce sera le plus embêtant. Pendant trois mois, du 7 janvier au 29 mars, tous les trains de la journée, entre 8h30 et 17h, seront remplacés par des cars. C'est-à-dire neuf TER, quatre Intercités et deux TGV. Ceux des heures de pointe, le matin et le soir, circuleront mais ils rouleront un peu moins vite. Le trajet Nantes-La Roche durera 8 minutes de plus. Les abonnés seront prévenus dans les jours qui viennent des nouveaux horaires.
nantes  bordeaux  transport 
13 days ago
Twitter
I think you will find it is a little more complicated than that
Some key wo…
from twitter
13 days ago
Prix du carburant : un débat pollué par des intox
Toutefois, on ne peut pas résumer cela à une décision purement budgétaire. La hausse importante de la fiscalité que subit actuellement le diesel est, en fait, un rattrapage. Pendant de nombreuses décennies, le diesel a bénéficié de taxes plus faibles que l’essence. Cette ère s’est terminée sous le quinquennat de François Hollande, en 2014, quand les autorités ont considéré que le diesel n’était, finalement, pas vraiment moins polluant que l’essence. Elles ont donc engagé un alignement de la fiscalité des deux carburants, pour dissuader les automobilistes d’acheter des véhicules diesel.

Le gouvernement actuel s’inscrit dans la même logique, et augmente de manière générale la fiscalité des carburants. Avec en creux l’objectif d’inciter à consommer moins d’essence et de gazole, c’est-à-dire à s’équiper de véhicules moins voraces, à rouler moins, à pratiquer plus largement le covoiturage ou à utiliser d’autres moyens de transports.
oil  driving  france 
13 days ago
How do I know if an article is good? an #ACSBoston tale | Rapha-z-lab
However the entire paper is based largely on a false premise: the idea that it is the “introduction of a deluge of new open-access online journals” which creates this reliability problem. This is hardly the case. The difficulty in identifying poor articles is not the deluge of open access journals nor is it predatory publishing. The growth in the volume of publications is not particularly related to open access and predatory publishing can be easily identified (with a little bit of common sense and a few pointers). The abstract (and to a lesser extent the talk) also conflates the evaluation of the reliability of a journal (an impossible task if you ask me) and the reliability of an article (an extremely onerous task if you ask me, but more on this later). Do I need to comment on the “rule of thumbs“?

I do teach third year undergraduate students on a similar topic. I ask them this same question: “how can you evaluate the validity of a scientific article?”. I write their answers on the white board; in whatever order, I get: the prestige of the University/Authors/Journal, the impact factor, the quality (?) of the references… I then cross it all.
openaccess  peerreview  philosophy  sciencepublishing  science 
13 days ago
Most drivers in fatal collisions with cyclists avoid jail says Cycling UK research | road.cc
From 2007-17, in the areas covered by the 10 police forces that responded, 209 cyclist fatalities were recorded. Less than half, 86, resulted in a motorist being charged with causing death by careless or dangerous driving.

Of those, 66 were convicted, with just under half of them – 31 – receiving a custodial sentence.
cycling  deaths  uk  police  law 
14 days ago
Twitter
Sometimes I worry about when his voice goes all high pitched - don't get all too stressed matey, otherw…
from twitter_favs
14 days ago
Backstop breakdown is a product of the oldest Brexit lie
May and Brexit secretary Dominic Raab knew this, so they started issuing the most insane promises. They said it would be time limited. But of course it would not, because then it wouldn't be a backstop. They said the UK would have the unilateral right to revoke it. But of course it would not, because then it wouldn't be a backstop. They said that afterwards the UK would be free to sign whatever trade deals it wanted. Except of course it would not, because that makes absolutely no sense whatsoever. A customs union means you sign up to the same tariffs. A single market in goods means you sign up to the same regulatory standards. And if you have done that, you will not be able to negotiate meaningful independent trade deals, because you have no leverage.
Brexit 
14 days ago
A self-driving car can choose who dies in a fatal crash. These are the ethical considerations | World Economic Forum
To conduct the survey, the researchers designed what they call “Moral Machine,” a multilingual online game in which participants could state their preferences concerning a series of dilemmas that autonomous vehicles might face. For instance: If it comes right down it, should autonomous vehicles spare the lives of law-abiding bystanders, or, alternately, law-breaking pedestrians who might be jaywalking? (Most people in the survey opted for the former.)
All told, “Moral Machine” compiled nearly 40 million individual decisions from respondents in 233 countries; the survey collected 100 or more responses from 130 countries. The researchers analyzed the data as a whole, while also breaking participants into subgroups defined by age, education, gender, income, and political and religious views. There were 491,921 respondents who offered demographic data.
driverless  driving  research 
14 days ago
Twitter
RT : Just gonna start wearing a stethoscope and pushing a stroller everywhere, in the stroller will be several cats…
from twitter
14 days ago
Twitter
Voilà le danger de l'importation des mœurs néerlandaises sans réflexion : la vie piétonne a…
from twitter
16 days ago
Le prix du carburant, facture salée de l’étalement urbain | L'interconnexion n'est plus assurée
Les déplacements quotidiens continuent de s’allonger chaque année, et se font dans une grande majorité en voiture. Le prix de l’essence est devenu, pour chaque personne concernée, un indicateur ressenti du coût de la vie, et sa contestation un marqueur social. Un peu comme prix du blé autrefois, rapporte le directeur du département opinion de l’Ifop.
transport  urban  france  energy 
16 days ago
« earlier      
advertising agnotology agriculture air_quality airpollution alcohol altmetrics amazon anonymity anthropology archiving art assange attention authoritarianism aéroport beall bitcoin blogs bookselling breastfeeding brexit business canada cannabis censorship charliehebdo chilcot china citation climate climatechange coaching code coding commenting cool copyright corpus crash_report crime crowdsourcing culture cycling database dccomment deaths design dictionary digitalhumanities driverless driving drugs ebm ebooks economics editing education email energy enfr english environment ethics eu europe exclusion facebook feminism finance food france français free freedom freesoftware fren funny german germany git goldsmith google grammar guardian hardware health healthcare helmetwars history humanrights immigration indexing informationmastery internet interpreting iraq irony israel jbcomment journalism journals language law learning library linkrot linux literature london maps mathematics media medicine military mooc music nantes nddl netherlands networking newmedia news newspapers nukes oaspa oil open openaccess opendata openness openscience opensource palestine peerreview philosophy photography physiology poetry police politics pollution pqpc prison privacy programming psychology publishing racism religion renewables repositories research reviews road_safety russia safety satire scholarly science sciencepublishing scotland screwmeneutics search searchengines security sex socialmedia socialnetworking sociology software sound spectacle sport statistics surveillance syria tax teaching technology telephony television text text_tools theory tools torture translation transport twitter ubuntu uk urban us video walking war web wikileaks wikipedia work writing youtube zizek

Copy this bookmark:



description:


tags: