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Richard Weller: Could the sun be good for your heart?
Our bodies get Vitamin D from the sun, but as dermatologist Richard Weller suggests, sunlight may confer another surprising benefit too. New research by his team shows that nitric oxide, a chemical transmitter stored in huge reserves in the skin, can be released by UV light, to great benefit for blood pressure and the cardiovascular system. What does it mean? Well, it might begin to explain why Scots get sick more than Australians ...
TED 
march 2013
Why has Canada killed off the penny?
Once a small coin can no longer be used to buy individual items, but is used only to make change, it becomes more trouble than it is worth.
Economist  from instapaper
february 2013
Arab Spring and the Israeli enemy
The questions now are: What was the real cost of these wars to the Arab world and its people. And the harder question that no Arab national wants to ask is: What was the real cost for not recognizing Israel in 1948 and why didn’t the Arab states spend their assets on education, health care and the infrastructures instead of wars? But, the hardest question that no Arab national wants to hear is whether Israel is the real enemy of the Arab world and the Arab people.
ArabNews  from instapaper
january 2013
Forget Overcrowding. The World Population Could Start Declining.
In other words, the rate of global population growth has slowed. And it’s expected to keep slowing.
Slate  from instapaper
january 2013
O melhor e o pior das PPP
Em resumo, as PPP são financiamentos que o Estado contraiu. Se descobrimos entretanto que a taxa de juro nestes financiamentos é alta de mais, então vamos trocar por uma mais baixa
Publico  from instapaper
january 2013
Julian Treasure: Why architects need to use their ears
Because of poor acoustics, students in classrooms miss 50 percent of what their teachers say and patients in hospitals have trouble sleeping because they continually feel stressed. Julian Treasure sounds a call to action for designers to pay attention to the “invisible architecture” of sound.
TED 
november 2012
The Russians Didn’t Just Use Pencils in Space
A longstanding urban legend goes like this: During the space race of the 1960s, NASA spent millions developing a fancy “space pen” that could be used in zero gravity … but the Soviets just used a pencil.
MentalFloss  from instapaper
november 2012
Ramesh Raskar: Imaging at a trillion frames per second
Ramesh Raskar presents femto-photography, a new type of imaging so fast it visualizes the world one trillion frames per second, so detailed it shows light itself in motion. This technology may someday be used to build cameras that can look “around” corners or see inside the body without X-rays.
TED 
november 2012
Scenes From Antarctica
Summer is returning to Antarctica and researcher teams from around the world are heading south for the (relatively) warm season. Among them are members of a Russian team that drilled into Lake Vostok last February. Vostok is a subglacial lake some 4,000 meters below the surface of the ice, and the plan is to send a robot down there this summer to collect water samples and sediments from the bottom. Research also continues at the South Pole Telescope, the IceCube Neutrino Observatory, and dozens of other locations around Antarctica. Gathered here are recent images of Antarctica, its environment, and some of the scientific work taking place there.
Atlantic  InFocus 
november 2012
Clay Shirky: How the Internet will (one day) transform government
The open-source world has learned to deal with a flood of new, oftentimes divergent, ideas using hosting services like GitHub -- so why can’t governments? In this rousing talk Clay Shirky shows how democracies can take a lesson from the Internet, to be not just transparent but also to draw on the knowledge of all their citizens.

Clay Shirky argues that the history of the modern world could be rendered as the history of ways of arguing, where changes in media change what sort of arguments are possible -- with deep social and political implications.
TED 
november 2012
Slogger by ttscoff
Slogger indexes various public social services and creates Day One (http://dayoneapp.com/) journal entries or plain text Markdown files for them. It allows you to keep a personal journal that collects your online social life automatically, all in one place.
apple  MacStories 
november 2012
Airplane Mode
This was a reminder to me that the technology can, when used effectively, provide a enhancement to the stories we tell and allow us to capture the things that matter. It’s ability to distract is only as powerful as our ability to not let it do so.
MinimalMac  from instapaper
november 2012
Robert Neuwirth: The power of the informal economy
Robert Neuwirth spent four years among the chaotic stalls of street markets, talking to pushcart hawkers and gray marketers, to study the remarkable "System D," the world's unlicensed economic network. Responsible for some 1.8 billion jobs, it's an economy of underappreciated power and scope.
TED 
october 2012
Jonathan Foley: The other inconvenient truth
A skyrocketing demand for food means that agriculture has become the largest driver of climate change, biodiversity loss and environmental destruction. At TEDxTC Jonathan Foley shows why we desperately need to begin "terraculture" -- farming for the whole planet.
TED 
october 2012
How Slight Sleep Deprivation Could Add Extra Pounds
Ghrelin is involved in sending hunger signals and leptin helps to tell you that you are full. In one study, after just two consecutive nights of four-hours’ sleep, test subjects had a 28 percent higher ghrelin (hunger) hormone level and 18 percent lower leptin (satiety) hormone level in their blood compared with subjects who had spent 10 hours a night in bed.
ScientificAmerican  from instapaper
october 2012
Daphne Koller: What we're learning from online education
Daphne Koller is enticing top universities to put their most intriguing courses online for free -- not just as a service, but as a way to research how people learn. With Coursera (cofounded by Andrew Ng), each keystroke, quiz, peer-to-peer discussion and self-graded assignment builds an unprecedented pool of data on how knowledge is processed.

With Coursera, Daphne Koller and co-founder Andrew Ng are bringing courses from top colleges online, free, for anyone who wants to take them.
TED 
october 2012
Eddie Obeng: Smart failure for a fast-changing world
The world is changing much more rapidly than most people realize, says business educator Eddie Obeng -- and creative output cannot keep up. In this spirited talk, he highlights three important changes we should understand for better productivity, and calls for a stronger culture of “smart failure."
TED 
october 2012
Noble Matching
Now what is good about this algorithm? First, Gale and Shapley proved that the algorithm converges to a solution for a very wide range of preferences. Second, the algorithm is stable in the sense that there is no man and no woman who would rather be matched to each other than to their current match. There are of course, men who would prefer to marry other women and there are women who would prefer to marry other men but no mutually preferable match is possible. Thus, the algorithm produces a stable match.
MarginalRevolution  from instapaper
october 2012
Why We Lie
In short, very few people steal to a maximal degree, but many good people cheat just a little here and there. We fib to round up our billable hours, claim higher losses on our insurance claims, recommend unnecessary treatments and so on.
WSJ  from instapaper
october 2012
Andrew Blum: What is the Internet, really?
When a squirrel chewed through a cable and knocked him offline, journalist Andrew Blum started wondering what the Internet was really made of. So he set out to go see it -- the underwater cables, secret switches and other physical bits that make up the net.

For his new book, "Tubes," Andrew Blum visited the places where the internet exists in physical form: the cables and switches and servers that virtually connect us. Full bio »
TED 
october 2012
Brené Brown: The power of vulnerability
Brené Brown studies human connection -- our ability to empathize, belong, love. In a poignant, funny talk, she shares a deep insight from her research, one that sent her on a personal quest to know herself as well as to understand humanity. A talk to share.
TED 
october 2012
Mythbusting: Running A Mile Always Burns The Same Calories
But as far as I can tell — and despite what you’ve probably heard — not all miles are equal after all
SweatScience  from instapaper
october 2012
Oct. 8, 1582: Nothing Happens … in Catholic Lands
Em 1582, mudou-se para o calendário gregoriano: "Many people thought their lives were being shortened by 10 days"
Wired  from instapaper
october 2012
The Evolutionary Advantage of Depression
...authored a paper “The evolutionary significance of depression in pathogen host defense” in which they proposed that some of the alleles (forms of genes) that increase one’s risk for depression also enhance immune responses to infections.
Atlantic  from instapaper
october 2012
David MacKay: A reality check on renewables
How much land mass would renewables need to power a nation like the UK? An entire country's worth. In this pragmatic talk, David MacKay tours the basic mathematics that show worrying limitations on our sustainable energy options and explains why we should pursue them anyway.
TED 
october 2012
Experimental Stem Cell Therapy May Help Burn Victims
Within months, Kelly was able to regain 40 degrees of motion that she had lost more than 40 years ago.
ABC  from instapaper
october 2012
Ben Goldacre: What doctors don't know about the drugs they prescribe
When a new drug gets tested, the results of the trials should be published for the rest of the medical world -- except much of the time, negative or inconclusive findings go unreported, leaving doctors and researchers in the dark. In this impassioned talk, Ben Goldacre explains why these unreported instances of negative data are especially misleading and dangerous.
TED 
october 2012
Trinity Explosion
Trinity Explosion with sound. From the Atomic Age video collection.

first nuclear bomb
video 
september 2012
Nuclear Testing 1945 - 1998
"2053" - This is the number of nuclear explosions conducted in various parts of the globe.

Japanese artist Isao Hashimoto has created a beautiful, undeniably scary time-lapse map of the 2053 nuclear explosions which have taken place between 1945 and 1998, beginning with the Manhattan Project's "Trinity" test near Los Alamos and concluding with Pakistan's nuclear tests in May of 1998. This leaves out North Korea's two alleged nuclear tests in this past decade. Each nation gets a blip and a flashing dot on the map whenever they detonate a nuclear weapon, with a running tally kept on the top and bottom bars of the screen.
video 
september 2012
What Happens to Stolen Bicycles?
Ultimately, that’s the point everyone seems to agree on - bike thieves are assholes. For everything else, there is little consensus and hard evidence. However, some things are clear and explain a lot of the bike theft that occurs.
Priceonomics  from instapaper
september 2012
Augusto Mateus: Portugal é mais China do que pensamos
"Não interessa exportar quando muito daquilo que se exporta vem de fora"
JornalNegócios  from instapaper
september 2012
Pam Warhurst: How we can eat our landscapes
What should a community do with its unused land? Plant food, of course. With energy and humor, Pam Warhurst tells at the TEDSalon the story of how she and a growing team of volunteers came together to turn plots of unused land into communal vegetable gardens, and to change the narrative of food in their community.
TED 
september 2012
Leadership Lessons from Dwight D. Eisenhower #1: How to Build and Sustain Morale
"Leadership is the art of getting someone else to do something that you want done because he wants to do it"
ArtOfManliness  from instapaper
september 2012
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