jar + hammer   19

Mind Pollution
The accelerating deterioration of our environments due
to our activities is now attracting more and more attention. Waste
products pollute the air, the waters, the land, and even the moon.
Overpopulation is another polluting threat. Yet the primary attention
given to these polluting activities is directed to the more or less
immediate causes rather than primary causes. One primary cause of the
irresponsibility we demonstrate lies in the establishments of attitudes,
habits, goals, and philosophies. This may be called mind pollution.

Preston Hammer, circa 1970
hammer 
september 2012 by jar
Theoretical possibilities of automatic computers
It has been a drawback to the optimal use of high-speed computers that it is frequently assumed that the symbols or words "are" either numbers or orders. Partially for this reason the so-called "infinite" processes of analysis are assumed
beyand the pole of computers. Obviously this is not the case since infinite series, derivatives, integrals, etc., may be represented in a computer if they may be represented in print.
hammer  meaning 
september 2012 by jar
Shannon, TESPAR And Approximation Strategies
R. A. King and T. C. Phipps
In a paper on Approximation Spaces [4], Preston C. Hammer provides some comfort for us by confirming that:
h) “All models and simulations of systems are approximations.”
i) “There is no a priori measure of goodness of fit which is satisfactory for all purposes.”
Hammer also identifies, as a key modelling objective, an answer to the following question:
j) “What properties of a function should an approximation to it preserve ?”
hammer 
september 2012 by jar
Oral History Transcript — Dr. Ted Taylor
The head of the computer group was Preston Hammer. I would go to him with a little piece of paper with some proposed new dimensions or new masses for an implosion calculation. This was within a couple of months of the time I got there, because somehow a sense of trust developed that I wouldn't tell him to do something stupid. He would then say fine, and he'd use the IBM machine—which was not an IBM 701 or an IBM 650. I don't know what it was called.
hammer  to-read 
september 2012 by jar
The role and nature of mathematics
Mathematics has recently achieved, along with certain other branches of learning, a new status. The reasons are numerous but they are associated with the successes of fields formerly confined to the remote reaches of erudite scholarship in applications of concern to all of us. The causes which have led us to re-examine the mathematics curriculum are not necessarily those springing from the highest motives attributed idealistically to science and scientific enterprise. A central factor is the success of the Russians. It is a sobering fact that societies will often make the effort to achieve great things only under duress, for example, in the interest of so-called defense.

Pi Mu Epsilon Journal
1964
hammer  to-read 
september 2012 by jar
Preston Hammer | LinkedIn
Preston Hammer was a member of the Math Department Faculty at the University of Wisconsin from 1952-1964. He later became Chairman of the Computer Science Department at The Pennsylvania State University.

[Odd that Hammer, who died in 1986, would have a LinkedIn profile. Doubly odd given how many errors there are in it.]
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september 2012 by jar
Standards of mathematical terminology
Preston C. Hammer
manuscript, circa 1970

A short while ago (early 1969), I circulated a letter to a number of professional organizations the memberships or activities of which might well be related to standards of mathematical nomenclature. This letter received scant attention, the one evincing the most positive interest being the U.S.A. Standards Institute. Now it is an interesting question for sociologists of science to consider. Why is it that a field which is so proud of intellectual achievement seems to abound with virtual illiterates? In a young field like computer science, it is not surprising to find the ridiculous terminology present, but in a conservative, long established field like mathematics one might think that there would be evinced a certain internal discipline which would be displayed in the cogency with which terminology is employed. Yet, I find the contrary to be true. It seems that to every happy choice of a name there are at least two choices of dubious quality.
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august 2012 by jar
Proceedings, Computation Seminar, 1949
with contributions by: John von Neumann, Preston Hammer, and others
hammer 
july 2012 by jar
Review: The Future of Applied Mathematics (W. Freiberger, ed.)
Perston C. Hammer
SIAM Rev. 18-2 (1976), pp. 310-311
1976
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july 2012 by jar
Oral History Interview: Mary Ellen Rudin (0149)
Rudin talks about Preston C. Hammer.
Interview, 1979.
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july 2012 by jar
Randomness is nonsense
Preston C. Hammer
1976
paywalled
hammer 
july 2012 by jar
Extended Topology: The Continuity Concept
Preston C. Hammer
JSTOR: Mathematics Magazine, Vol. 36, No. 2 (Mar., 1963), pp. 101-105
hammer 
july 2012 by jar
Computer science and smaller colleges
Preston C. Hammer
1971
This means that from elementary algebra on, identities have been misinterpreted in mathematics, since they confuse the result with the process which produces the result. In computer science two algorithms which produce the same results are not to be regarded as equivalent completely! In other words, the distinction between a verb and the object in a sentence is relevant in computer science.
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july 2012 by jar
Preston C. Hammer obituary - International Journal of General Systems
Systems thinking, which was natural to Preston, made him critical of
some areas of mathematics such as classical topology, metric spaces,
or geometry. He felt that these areas were too restrictive for dealing
with some key systems problems and, consequently, he attempted to
develop appropriate generalizations.

George J. Klir
1991
hammer 
july 2012 by jar
Extended topology and systems
Theory of Computing Systems, Volume 1, Number 2 - SpringerLink
Preston C. Hammer
1967
paywalled.
In this paper is indicated the possible utility of isotonic spaces as a background language for discussing systems. In isotonic spaces the basic duality between "neighborhood" and "convergent" first achieves a proper background permitting applications beyond the scope of topological spaces. A generalization of continuity of mappings based on ancestral relations is presented and this definition is applied to establish a necessary and sufficient condition that mappings preserve connectedness. Fortunately for systems theory, it is not necessary to have infinite sets or infinitary operators to apply definitions of neighborhood, convergents, continuity and connectedness.
hammer  to-read 
july 2012 by jar
Undergraduate computer science education
Preston C. Hammer
1970
(paywalled)
Most universities and colleges, even while attempting to organize computer programs, have shown very little grasp of the need for computer science education. The computer manufacturers themselves have often seemed opposed to such education while eager to sell machines tobe managed atrociously by untutored personnel. It is obvious that equipment as expensive as computers are, should be in charge of very well prepared people. It is also obvious that businesses, industries, and governmental agencies are not prepared to provide an adequate background in computer science. It would be a grievous error, however, to treat the computer science area as one which is merely technical and not fit for a liberal education. The intellectual character of computer science as we shall indicate more fully later, is at a higher level of thought than many computer scientists themselves realize.
hammer  to-read 
july 2012 by jar

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