4338
The year ahead in planning - Adliterate
"we must now take responsibility for making automation a force for effectiveness not just efficiency, serving our clients’ broader agenda."
from instapaper
march 2017
Build a Better Lead Database With Artificial Intelligence Chatbots
"chatbots can free up time for marketers to focus on strategy and expanding opportunity for their clients"
from instapaper
march 2017
Planners need to get out of the echo chamber this year, warns Saatchi & Saatchi's Richard Huntington
"A decade ago, Paul Feldwick talked about the industry’s "benign conspiracy". A conspiracy in which we know that advertising works in concert with our emotional decision-making processes but we pretend to clients and our clients pretend to their organisations that the paraphernalia of rational decision-making, of facts, claims and truths, are still the backbone of successful marketing. This conspiracy has to stop. It is disingenuous and it makes our business far too hit-and-miss. If the two most effective campaigns of 2016, for Leave and Donald Trump, dispensed with facts, truth, logic and reason, we must rapidly figure out what this means for effective brand communications."
from instapaper
january 2017
B.A.S.A.A.P. – Blog – BERG
"Again, staying on the puppy side of the uncanny valley is a design strategy here"
from instapaper
december 2016
The Philosophy of Advertising: Strategist Faris Yakob Talks Shop with Use All Five | Use All Five
"That said, media agencies exist to buy media. They may do other stuff now, but trading is at the heart of the business model and trading requires fungibility, it requires currencies, it requires standardization. If media agencies had to create a new trading model, a new exchange medium, a new approach, for every single campaign or buy they would stop being profitable standalone entities."
december 2016
M Booth Says "Welcome To The Age Of Small Ideas" | Co.Create | creativity + culture + commerce
"Building a creative culture is more important than building a creative department."
december 2016
Russell Davies: engagement and attention 3
"Which makes me think about things like this. There are a few examples of this kind of thing out there and they make me wonder whether one strand of the future for marketing is to provide genuinely useful services, and do the delivery of associations and feelings around the edges."
december 2016
How to Set Goals for Employees - Management - WSJ.com
"– Goals must align with the organization’s mission and strategy. – They must be clear and easy to understand. – They must be accepted and recognized as important by everyone who will have to implement them. – Progress towards goals must be measurable. – Goals must be framed in time, with clear beginning and ending points. – They should be supported by rewards. – They should be challenging, but achievable."
from instapaper
november 2016
www.nytimes.com
"Curtis and I briefly discussed a word coined by the critic Timothy Morton to describe a problem so vast in space and time that you are unable to apprehend it: a “hyperobject.” Global warming is a classic example of a hyperobject: it’s everywhere and nowhere, too encompassing to think about. Global markets, too. But naming a hyperobject alone is of limited use; human cognition knows all too well how to file such imminent imponderables away, on a “to-do” list that’s never consulted again."
october 2016
Speed as a Habit | First Round Review
"Questions are your best weapon against inertia."
from instapaper
october 2016
Peter Bevelin on Seeking Wisdom, Mental Models, and Learning
"To paraphrase Buffett and Munger – decision-making is not about making brilliant decisions, but avoiding terrible ones"
from instapaper
october 2016
www.linkedin.com
"But it is a liberating force that allows us to cut through the clutter of today’s marketing world and remind ourselves that our job is help brands become shortcuts, in today's paradox of choice, that lead to business growth."
october 2016
The Important Habit of Just Starting
"Almost all studies agree that procrastination leads to to higher rates of depression, anxiety, and poorer well-being. In our professional lives, it can have dire consequences. In our new way of working, with increased autonomy to work when and how we want, your word is your reputation. And missing deadlines for no good reason, is really no good reason."
october 2016
Rome is Burning — The Creative Network — Medium
"It also found that wealthier consumers are more likely to block ads. In the US alone an estimated 45 million are using ad-blocking technology and eMarketer predicted that 15 million people in the UK would begin using ad-blockers by the end of 2017."
from instapaper
august 2016
TLSWaking up in Europa – TheTLS
"And it was only much later that I found, on my travels, a copy of Sebastian Haffner’s little book Bemerkungen zu Hitler, in which he largely settles the question of why Hitler (pace Boris Johnson) could never unite Europe except by putting barbed wire around it: he wasn’t sufficiently interested in administering nations, only in exterminating populations."
from instapaper
july 2016
Northern Planner: The problem with most briefs is they solve brand problems rather than business problems
"I think the focal point of any brief is knowing how or why people buy the category. What goes through their mind when they're buying it?"
from instapaper
july 2016
Turning your anxiety into excitement
"Some recent research suggests that if you're feeling anxious, saying "I am excited" can switch your heightened emotional state from negative (anxiety) to positive (excitement)."
from instapaper
july 2016
Trump Days - The New Yorker
"So the couple’s assertion was true but not complexly true."
july 2016
trackchanges.postlight.com
"The newsletter was first established by the Association for Computing Machinery in 1984, to be moderated (it still is) by Peter G. Neumann. Risks announced itself with a clear mission (emphasis added): Its intent is to address issues involving risks to the public in the use of computers. As such, it is necessarily concerned with whether/how critical requirements for human safety, reliability, fault tolerance, security, privacy, integrity, and guaranteed service (among others) can be met (in some cases all at the same time), and how the attempted fulfillment or ignorance of those requirements may imply risks to the public. That’s a really good list, especially when you consider it was made in 1984. Think about it in the context of 2016. Human safety. Should a self-driving car smash into a bus full of orphans in order to not kill a squirrel? What about an endangered squirrel? Reliability. Check out this new, unusable, but type-safe programming languages. This one will make it possible to [signal cuts out]. Fault tolerance. Hold on rebooting my car so I can update my phone. Security. They hijacked my SIMM card so they could bypass the two-factor authentication, but otherwise things are fine. Privacy. Hi we’re the robots from Target and we’d like to talk to your uterus. Integrity. This one doesn’t get used as much as it used to—apparently asystem has “integrity” when you have “complete assurance” that all of its components are correct and reliable. I imagine people just gave up hope. Guaranteed service. Could you get on the Wi-Fi? No? Me neither. The whole industry is still wrestling with each of these, every day. A huge number of discussions in technology touch on these subjects. We live in a world of Risks."
july 2016
Warren Berger's Three-Part Method for More Creativity
"It may be that the Why? –> What if? line of inquiry is common to all types of innovative thinking because it engages the part of our brain that starts turning over old ideas in new ways by combining them with other unrelated ideas, much of them previously sitting idle in our subconscious. That churning is where new ideas really arise."
from instapaper
july 2016
Jacking off in a virtual museum — Medium
"There are a few vr social networks and only some allow the Gear VR. BigScreen does not, Altspace is multi-platform (supports Rift, Vive, and Gear) but that place is full of what I call ‘spec nerds’ — dudes who probably look just like me {standard suburban white guy} who argue about: which platform has better motion tracking which platform has better motion controllers is it worth waiting for oculus touch? which platform has better games? Q:how do you have fingers? A.*25 min explanation of the leap motion* *virtually stacking vive controllers* surprisingly nobody talking about existential shit like what they’re gonna do if/when the matrix becomes real. (c’mon ya’ll, lets goof around some more, deeeeeeep talk style) Mostly just dudes complaining about current hardware/software problems."
from instapaper
july 2016
Not Hearing, But Listening — Jim Carroll's Blog
"Write It Down! My former boss, Nigel Bogle, spoke in meetings with unrivalled fluency, unparalleled structure. His conversation sparkled with appropriate aphorism and worldly wisdom. And yet I’d occasionally pass his office and see young Strategists sitting comfortably, chatting amiably, enjoying the high-level debate. What a waste! What could they recall beyond a general theme, direction or impression? What can you learn if you don’t write things down? I like to write what people say. Spoken language contains hidden codes. The choice of words, the particular phrasing, the sentence construction, the logic flow, they all say so much. There are shapes and patterns, themes and narratives. Direct speech always rewards further study. I’ve written elsewhere that modern Strategists should see themselves more as psychoanalysts than doctors (Not Doctors, But Psychoanalysts). Nowadays in business intuition and emotional intelligence trump command and control; marketing is more about revealing truth than adding value; and brand communication is more about expressing authenticity than creating image. In this context listening is becoming a primary commercial expertise, a differentiating leadership skill."
from instapaper
june 2016
Bits or pieces?: Wardley's Doctrine
"Use standard components where appropriate."
from instapaper
may 2016
Agile in the public sector – Roo Reynolds
"Probably the biggest thing I’ve learnt is that the sooner people can see something, even a prototype, even a paper sketch, the sooner you can get feedback, show progress and gain momentum. If it’s terrible, don’t wait. If it’s unfinished, good. You haven’t sunk unnecessary time into perfecting something you might well need to change or throw away. Get feedback early, and get feedback often. Show it, learn from it, and refine it."
from instapaper
may 2016
information theory and psychology – Mind Hacks
"Gottlob Burmann, a German poet who lived from 1737 to 1805, wrote 130 poems, including a total of 20,000 words, without once using the letter R. Further, during the last seventeen years of his life, Burmann even omitted the letter from his daily conversation."
from instapaper
may 2016
Lessons for New Managers of Creative Teams | giffconstable.com
"Fix root causes not symptoms. How do you find the root cause? Lean manufacturing calls it the 5 whys. You keep asking why something is happening until it feels like you are there. “Why did that happen? Because A. Why A? Because B. Why B? Because C.” As a manager, you want to fix C, not A."
from instapaper
may 2016
Ten Lessons from Bill Campbell — Medium
"Have a deliberate communications strategy internally. I think of Bill’s internal communications as a “communications architecture”, i.e., how to build organizations for effective communications. I patterned my own companies after this architecture. Bill had an executive staff who reported to him and met weekly; any issue, grievance or concern was discussed as a team. The next level of directors and key managers were the expanded management team. This group would meet offsite frequently to review the business plan, think about the future, and construct the next phase of the plan. Each of these managers was chartered with communicating the messages down through the organization. You cannot assume this communication just happens; you need to build it into the structure of the company."
may 2016
The Remarkable Advantage of Abundant Thinking | First Round Review
"What seems like a roller coaster to you is often a straight line to someone who's been there before,”"
from instapaper
may 2016
Everything as a Service - Stratechery by Ben Thompson
"The fundamental difference between manufacturing and services is that one entails the creation and transfer of ownership of a product, while the other is much more intangible: you visit a doctor or hire a lawyer, and you don’t get a widget to take home."
from instapaper
may 2016
The end of a mobile wave — Benedict Evans
"TV, once thought of as the next phase after PCs, turned to be an accessory to smartphones, and so are watches and (to some extent) even tablets."
from instapaper
may 2016
The Future of Work | Five Questions Every Manager Should Ask Themselves Weekly
"Five Questions to Ask Yourself Have I hired people who can do more with the work or am I just hiring to fill open roles? Quit debating the talent “chicken and the egg” (which comes first, a stellar organization or stellar talent) and challenge your every operating rule by hiring only the best candidates you can find. They’ll reshape you because that’s the only way they know how to work. Have I clearly explained the WHY behind how we work? A clear process is good at reducing errors, but too often, processes are introduced without an understanding of the contextual errors needing to be corrected, resulting in new problems and over-burdened workers. Think of the yearly planning cycle: while well-intentioned, it sucks the creativity and flexibility out of most organizations. Am I setting direction or dictating everyone’s actions? Everyone marching in lockstep looks great… until they march off a cliff. The more crowded and competitive a market, the more variety and spontaneity you want in your own workers. Once you explain the purpose, let the team work through the process on their own. Don’t mistake an orderly team for a productive one. Am I actively investing in helping my people gain new skills? Schools don’t train people to be creative workers, capable of generating inspired insights and taking ingenious action. Most organizations don’t either—but yours can. Training should be a persistent activity in your organization, and it should go beyond HR requirements. Find a learning and development program for your team, or carve out time weekly teach your team something new. Am I encouraging everyone to spend more time with our customers? Management processes tend to insulate the organization from the market. Instead, strip away abstractions and distractions in order to knit the customer directly to each employee."
from instapaper
may 2016
Edge.org
"Perhaps the most important news of our day is that datasets—not algorithms—might be the key limiting factor to development of human-level artificial intelligence."
from instapaper
april 2016
11 Charts That Explain the Future of Marketing | The Percolate Blog
"9 . Your mobile data is being eaten up by ads, not content The New York Times analyzed the page load times for 50 top news websites. The verdict: over half of all mobile data is spent on loading ads, not editorial content. These findings should serve as a red flag for both advertisers and publishers seeking to fight the ad blocking epidemic: if you want people to visit your site (and view your ads), give them a great mobile experience. Translated to marketing strategy, this might mean pivoting toward native content instead of interruptive ads."
from instapaper
april 2016
What I Learned from Trying to Innovate at the New York Times
"Organizations that pursue strategies like these have what I call the Ecosystem Mindset. All startups have it, while almost no big companies do. It’s an understanding that your organization is not a bounded entity, complete unto itself, but part of a wider ecosystem. It comes with an implicit understanding that the solutions to your key challenges are not all inside the building, but are out there — and that you must locate and interact with them to thrive."
from instapaper
april 2016
The Secret To Creativity: Become An Intellectual Middleman | Fast Company | Business + Innovation
""People become creative brokers," Duhigg writes, "when they learn to pay attention to how things make them react and feel." You are a human being, and your emotions and experiences can provide fodder for doing old things in new ways. He attributes the creative hit theme song from Frozen, "Let It Go," in part to songwriter Kristen Anderson-Lopez’s experience of feeling judged at times, and not thinking she should apologize for not being perfect. As Frozen writer Jennifer Lee told Duhigg, "‘Let It Go’ made Elsa feel like one of us.""
from instapaper
april 2016
The cult of branding | warc.com
"Advertising believes itself to be about messages, about what a company says through media to create perceptions in the minds of consumers. And so the mission and vision and values of a company became a liturgy, a public prayer. A set of magical words uttered at special meetings or on menus that have nothing to do with the behaviour of the company. They are inherently nondescript. What company in the world wouldn't claim to be exceptional, to have ethics, to be honest, to be customer focused? That last one is tautological -without customers, there is no company."
april 2016
The Sleeper Future Of Data Visualization? Photography | Co.Design | business + design
"Whereas the best data designers have to work very hard to make you recognize the significance of a bar chart, photography is human at its core."
from instapaper
march 2016
BigCos, NewCos, and the (Almost Ten) Trends Remaking Business — NewCo Shift — Medium
"5. Today’s consumers are newly empowered and are making decisions on more than price."
from instapaper
march 2016
The Music Critic in the Age of the Insta-Release - The New Yorker
"art is measured not just by the space it takes up but by the air it moves."
from twitter_favs
march 2016
10 tips for making hard facts easy reading – Poynter
"I keep near my computer an old saying attributed to an influential editor named Barney Kilgore: “The easiest thing for a reader to do is quit reading.”"
march 2016
What you know, what you do, and what you own. | TEST
"This isn’t the short burst of contact you get on a campaign. It’s a deep relationship that only gets more interesting and valuable over time, as the feedback you get starts to change your ideas about the project. Your projects start to become things that are owned jointly by you and your audience/users/customers, creating their own velocity and momentum. These Long Projects pay off in lots of ways that aren’t measured in commissions, funding or awards (although they sometimes lead to all these things)."
from instapaper
february 2016
An Insider’s Guide To Business Design At IDEO — IDEO Stories — Medium
"When we look for creative solutions to user problems, those solutions typically come in the form of a product or service. But what we deliver to a client — and what a customer eventually experiences — is not a product or service in a vacuum. It’s all the stuff around it too. I am able to think creatively around the design of the business by deconstructing all the assumptions around its business model and reassembling them to derive value in new ways. I believe that for a lot of products and services out there, the brilliance is in the business. Having hands-on experience in the education sector, I also bring deep industry expertise to my studio."
from instapaper
february 2016
The Real Blog: The way to succeed is sometimes sideways
"What is interesting about obliquity is that it applies to a range of other higher order policy objectives - from good parenting to eating healthy food. None of these seem to work if you focus on them directly. Or really, let's be honest, if you try and nudge people into the right behaviour, whatever it is considered to be."
from instapaper
february 2016
Political Reporters Know Nothing
"It is also based on what everyone else is predicting! There is career safety in numbers."
from instapaper
february 2016
Far Beyond Snowfall — Craig Mod
"“The big industrial publishers are realizing that the real challenge is thinking about what type of story you want to tell and what medium suits it best. Like rock-paper-scissors, the moving image does things print and audio can’t, and those two do things the other two also cannot.”"
from instapaper
february 2016
On PDFs — spencer wright
"You see, PDFs are where information goes to die, rather than to be used. If you have something to communicate, think *really* hard about whether you're okay with it dying. This goes for *way* more than just public data, too. Product info, scientific research, industry knowledge... Put it in a PDF, and it's frozen."
from instapaper
february 2016
I Quant NY - Proposed Council Pay Raise Would Move Salary from Top 2.3% to Top 0.3% of All NYC Employees
"You see, PDFs are where information goes to die, rather than to be used. Despite this, New York City continues to use PDFs to release so much of its own data and the Council does not seem to include this important caveat in so many of its important information sharing bills."
from instapaper
february 2016
“Information is so slippery, it’s uncontainable, it’s uncontrollable.” — Storythings Ltd — Medium
"One of the things today that the government is trying to wrangle with, and we were, is that information is so slippery, it’s uncontainable, it’s uncontrollable."
from instapaper
february 2016
Wigwag: The Magazine That Lex Built - The New Yorker
"Lex followed through on some truly whimsical ideas—there was a polka-dot issue—and he liked to match writers with unexpected stories. Casting against type, he sent me to a hedonist camp in Jamaica, where I sat fully clothed on a nude beach. He gambled on an Angolan writer named Sousa Jamba to write a Letter from Springfield. There are forty-nine Springfields in the United States (not counting the one on “The Simpsons”), and every month Sousa Jamba got off the bus in a different one."
from instapaper
january 2016
The Problem With Journalism Is You Need an Audience
"Here in America, journalism is media and media is a business. The upside of this is that it serves to align the product that media companies produce with the true interests of the public. The downside is that the true interests of the public are, for the most part, garbage."
from instapaper
january 2016
The journalistic orthodoxy - Om Malik
"The debate over who is a reporter and who is not, or what is a story and what isn’t a story is just a waste of time."
from instapaper
january 2016
Do the underlying structures of your company support how value is created? | From The Head Of Zeus Jones
"This is also the strategy that is propelling brands like Nike, Apple and Ford. Each have established a pace of innovation within their categories that is faster than the norm and are benefiting through dramatically improved financials by delivering better on what people actually want. Like Zara, they have invested in building infrastructures that simply allow them to innovate faster and with greater frequency than their competition."
from instapaper
january 2016
Redirecting to /blogposts/max-sebalds-writing-tips
"I can only encourage you to steal as much as you can. No one will ever notice. You should keep a notebook of tidbits, but don’t write down the attributions, and then after a couple of years you can come back to the notebook and treat the stuff as your own without guilt."
from instapaper
january 2016
Russell Davies: Fast loops
"Coram again: "Trust emphasizes implicit over explicit communications. Trust is the unifying concept. This gives the subordinate great freedom of action. Trust is an example of a moral force that helps bind groups together in what Boyd called an “organic whole.” Hopefully, such a team can remain connected to reality. The challenge for them is maintaining the speed while scaling. "A crucial part of the OODA Loop—or “Boyd Cycle,” as it has come to be known—is that once the process begins, it must not slow. It must continue and it must accelerate. Success is the greatest trap for the novice who properly implements the OODA Loop. He is so amazed at what he has done that he pauses and looks around and waits for reinforcements. But this is the time to exploit the confusion and to press on""
from instapaper
december 2015
It’s called reporting » Nieman Journalism Lab
"Shoe-leather reporting is rewarded because it represents the best of the Internet: authenticity, intimacy, access, an emotional connection. It ensures that the mission will endure — and, in ever-crowded and exhausting landscapes, distinguish us."
from instapaper
december 2015
Cross the Streams: Risk & Reward in the Audience’s World — Medium
"So the third area is about engagement, bringing your audience in as early as possible in the filmmaking process."
from instapaper
december 2015
#AgencyLife - The Big Agency Lie
"Because many agencies are deeply insecure about their ability to show tangible results, awards become their primary differentiator. This fuels the unhealthy dynamic between clients and agencies even more. Work is done because it wins awards, not because it achieves business objectives. Choosing an agency primarily on its awards is like choosing an intimate partner based on the car they drive."
from instapaper
december 2015
The marketing truths we are all in danger of forgetting - Adliterate
"Seeking greater penetration is almost always the winning strategy rather than attempting to shift average weight of purchase. Light buyers are your most valuable customers not loyalists. Virtually every brand needs more light buyers. Buying is the desired outcome from marketing not engagement, participation or conversation. We are obsessed by the wrong metrics. People never care enough about brands to want to be followers, friends or fans. Not at a scale that is commercially useful. Brands need to ensure their mental availability but its fanciful and hideously expensive to remain ‘always on’ and few people want them to be. Targeting is not the holy grail of marketing. It’s helpful to a point but rests on assumptions about human behaviour that are unpredictable and misleading. Wastage is under-rated. One way or another wastage is a conversation with tomorrow’s customers. There is no earned media. With a few highly notable exceptions, for most brands, all media is paid for media. There is no one way advertising works. Any campaign can work in many different ways and often in ways that were not explicitly intended. And a great campaign will improve all your metrics. Advertising works best with the consent of people. Consent that is best built when advertising is helpful, enjoyable and interesting. The digital inventory of today is destroying this consent day by day."
from instapaper
november 2015
Russell Davies: Events lateralized
"Choice little moments from If Then by Matthew De Abaitua. "And then events accelerated. No, James corrected himself, acceleration implies forward movement. Events lateralized. Events networked." "Remnants of corporate dialect remained in Alex’s speech" “Irrevocable decisions form character, James,” said Alex. “It’s a hard decision but by your age, you should have used up all the easy ones.” "The women spoke in a high questioning tone so as not to disturb the room with assertions""
from instapaper
november 2015
Polis – How journalism is turning emotional and what that might mean for news
"Transparency is the new objectivity. And how that works is the subject for a whole new lecture."
from instapaper
november 2015
Product invention workshops – Blog – BERG
"Why product invention? Because strategy has to take into account three big realities: The material. If we’re working with a magazine, what are the existing editorial processes? If we’re working with technology, what’s new and what’s possible? If we’re working with data, what can be revealed with algorithms? The material is the clay in our hands. Business needs. Design is at least one third organisational change. All projects beyond prototypes are collaborative — how will people in your firm organise to support and build your product? Do you have the right capabilities, or how can they be built? Some ideas are beautiful, in theory, but a distraction for your particular company… how can you tell if it’s a good idea or not? People and the market. Call them customers, readers, or users, they’re all people. And human psychology is bigger than your product. People now expect to be treated as peers, and involved in the product conversation. The market has its own expectations too. A good product will market itself… if it fits the market well. By forcing our strategy recommendations to be expressed in the form of products, we ensure they’re buildable and amazing, make business sense for this particular organisation, and take advantage of the accelerant that is the market."
from instapaper
may 2015
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