dandv + gaming   6

Escape to another world | 1843
In 2015, 22% of men in their 20's hadn't been employed for a year, live with their parents, and appear to be playing video games constantly

"As games improve, the terms of this trade-off change. Among those predisposed to the leisure-luxury life, better games mean people are quicker to swap working hours for gaming hours; given nes-era gaming technology, a twenty-something might decline an opportunity for overtime work to have a little longer with Mario and Luigi. Now, a part-time job might be all they are willing to do, so good are the worlds and characters waiting at home. For those with the means, any hour on the job is an hour too much."

Gaming while young is pleasurable but risky because when you get older and your tastes change and become more expensive, you won't have had a career built.

"One can just about spot the vision of a distant, near-workless future in the habits of young gamers. If good things in life can be had for very little money, then working hard to have more than very little money looks less attractive."

[[
“Underemployment” – work in a position for which one is overqualified – has risen steadily since the beginning of the millennium; the share of recent college graduates working in jobs which did not require a college degree rose from just over 30% in the early 2000s to nearly 45% a decade later.

A life spent buried in video games, scraping by on meagre pay from irregular work or dependent on others, might seem empty and sad. Whether it is emptier and sadder than one spent buried in finance, accumulating points during long hours at the office while neglecting other aspects of life, is a matter of perspective. But what does seem clear is that the choices we make in life are shaped by the options available to us. A society that dislikes the idea of young men gaming their days away should perhaps invest in more dynamic difficulty adjustment in real life. And a society which regards such adjustments as fundamentally unfair should be more tolerant of those who choose to spend their time in an alternate reality, enjoying the distractions and the succour it provides to those who feel that the outside world is more rigged than the game.]]
gaming  unemployment  time  job  economics 
april 2017 by dandv
2014-Oct: Benchmarking Unity performance in WebGL – Unity Blog
"The most important takeaway is, while there are still areas where WebGL is significantly slower than native code, overall you can get expect very decent performance already, and this can only get better in the future."

The gap has been closing - see https://blogs.unity3d.com/2015/12/15/updated-webgl-benchmark-results/
WebGL  performance  Unity  3D  gaming  engine  benchmark  native 
september 2016 by dandv
How to master your life - Leading a better life - Quora
"Being successful at The Sims is very easy. It’s just like real life, **except without a barrier between what you decide and what you do.**"

Say you want to get fit.

In the Sims, you immediately buy whatever lame fitness equipment you can afford. If you can’t afford anything, go run in the park. Each day you tell your Sim to spend a spare minute exercising, and although progress is slow, you see their bars slowly inch up. Success is guaranteed.

In real life you think about getting fit. You’re not sure what to buy. Can you really afford the ‘right’ equipment? You read reviews. Do you have enough time? You ask questions on Quora. Maybe you buy something. You don’t know how to use it. Maybe you use it a couple times. You don’t see any results. You talk and think and share and do anything but exercise.

The first lesson from The Sims is good decisions require little thought. To get fit: exercise. To be smarter: read. To eat healthier: cook. Such mechanics are elementary to a child playing the game, but when leading your own life, your mischievous mind paralyses you with too much thinking. Stop holding out for perfect decisions. Pick. Act.

You can solve half the hassles of humanity this way. “I like this girl, how do I get her to like me?” Just click on her, and pick something.

“But what do I say?” Anything moves you closer to your goal. Pick something. “But she might not like me!” Right now, she doesn’t even know you. Fix that. Pick something.

The second lesson from The Sims is to nurture your state.

If your Sim is tired, desperate for company or wetting themselves, they won’t get much done. A decent player keeps an eye on these bars and never lets them slide too far; the exceptional player builds a life that takes care of them automatically.

And so it is in real life. If you’ve found yourself having a crappy pointless argument, chances are you were a bad mix of tired, stressed, or hungry at the time. If you want to be your wittiest, smartest, and most resilient, you’d better take consistently good care of yourself. The best way to be consistently awesome is to be in a consistently good state.

The third lesson from The Sims is to build selected skills.

Almost every action your Sim can take makes them better at something. Some skills are easier to gain, depending on your natural strengths, but you can get impressively decent at just about anything with time.

You don't live forever though, so to get great at something means saying no to something else. You must pick, and focus. Fully developed strengths tend to make your weaknesses irrelevant. Woody Allen would not be better off if he had spent less time writing and more time at the gym.
insight  game  gaming  Sims  life  lesson  parallel  paradigm-shift  inspiration  motivation  profound 
november 2013 by dandv
Nearly half of all video-gamers are women - CNN.com
Apparently includes casual games and Facebook game apps.

[[According to the "2013 Essential Facts About the Computer and Video Game Industry" report, produced by the Entertainment Software Association, 45% of all game players, and 46% of the most frequent purchasers of games, are female. Adult women make up 31% of the game-playing population.

The ESA shows that 35% of parents are playing computer and video games with their children every week and 58% are playing with them at least once a month.
The computer and video game industry as a whole had $14.8 billion in sales in 2012, according to the ESA report.]]

The report: http://www.theesa.com/facts/pdfs/ESA_EF_2013.pdf
gaming  industry  statistics  women  gamers 
september 2013 by dandv

Copy this bookmark:



description:


tags: