copystar + uofwinds   662

The Navy’s USS Gabrielle Giffords and the Future of Work - The Atlantic
And he discovered another correlation in his test: The people who did best tended to score high on “openness to new experience”—a personality trait that is normally not a major job-performance predictor and that, in certain contexts, roughly translates to “distractibility.” To borrow the management expert Peter Drucker’s formulation, people with this trait are less focused on doing things right, and more likely to wonder whether they’re doing the right things.

High in fluid intelligence, low in experience, not terribly conscientious, open to potential distraction—this is not the classic profile of a winning job candidate. But what if it is the profile of the winning job candidate of the future? If that’s the case, some important implications would arise.
UofWinds 
july 2019 by copystar
Sci-Hub/Learning Synths/Strikethrough stress note | Cool Tools
Learn what synthesizers do
I spent 45 minutes interacting with the sliders and buttons at Learning Synths and now I understand concepts like envelope, attack, decay, sustain, and release. I was having so much fun I didn’t realize I was being taught a lesson, either. — MF
UofWinds 
july 2019 by copystar
Alison Gopnik changed how I think about love - Vox
Alison Gopnik changed how I think about love. The professor came on The Ezra Klein Show to talk about parenting, friendships, marriage, and schooling. ht https://kottke.org/19/06/my-recent-media-diet-summer-solstice-2019-edition pair with ML google
UofWinds 
july 2019 by copystar
swissmiss | Friday Link Pack (Gone Sunday)
A curated list of the best analogue and digital toolboxes and methods from companies, institutions and thinkers: The Toolbox Toolbox
UofWinds 
june 2019 by copystar
Minecraft Earth Wants to Be the Next Pokémon Go—But Bigger | WIRED
Moreover, Minecraft Earth doesn’t use GPS. Instead, it uses something called Azure Spatial Anchors, which leverage Open Street Map and Microsoft’s massive Azure cloud system to generate hundreds of millions of locations around the planet where players can interact with the game. (Seattle alone has more than 100,000.) Not only are these “feature points” more precise than GPS, which has a sizable error radius, but they’re able to include data like altitude, which enables the game to distinguish between a location at sidewalk level and something that might be on an upper floor of a building. Over time, as more people visit feature points, their specific anonymized locations—and the angles from which they view the feature points—help refine the data even further. ht sentiers
UofWinds 
may 2019 by copystar
Scotch Snaps in Hip Hop - YouTube
The Scotch Snap is everywhere in modern hip hop - a metrically accented sixteenth note followed by a dotted eighth note. Why is it everywhere? And where did it come from? ht https://twitter.com/flantz
UofWinds 
may 2019 by copystar
Just Ride — Real Life
If you were a young person in Amsterdam in 1965 you may have called yourself a “Provo.” Coined by the Dutch criminologist Wouter Buikhuisen to describe dropouts, beatniks, and other countercultural figures of 1960s Amsterdam, the word Provo was embraced by the very people it was meant to pathologize. Just like their Situationist comrades in Paris and the hippies in San Francisco, they held happenings, made public art, and shouted at cops; unlike their Parisian counterparts, some Provos sought power, and in 1965 ran for public office.

The next year the Provos circulated a pamphlet titled “What the Provos Want” which included several “white plans” — equal parts art projects and policy proposals. The “White Chimney Plan” called for industrial polluters to be taxed and publicly shamed by having their smoke stacks painted stark white, and the “White Chickens Plan” proposed turning police officers into social workers, carrying first aid kits and buckets of fried chicken. Their best known and perhaps most successful was the White Bicycle Plan (Witte Fietsenplan), which consisted of painting old but useable bikes white every night at midnight and leaving them around Amsterdam for anyone to ride.
UofWinds 
may 2019 by copystar
Amy Cuddy on Twitter: "Can someone please explain the plot/story of the entire #GOT series in a single tweet?"
Can someone please explain the plot/story of the entire #GOT series in a single tweet?
UofWinds 
may 2019 by copystar
I Dream of Canteens ht Connection Problems
Then I looked in my book and found that the British Restaurants served nutritionally balanced meals (according to contemporary science) and had libraries and fresh flowers on the tables and gramophones and pianos and felt as if I were reading about a utopian vision of the future like I would see in a science fiction film. Further research in the Mass Observation Archives shows numerous interviews with people who felt delighted at feeling so full, that the food was hot. They served 50 million meals a week in 1945. Lord Woolton, the conservative minister for food, who had asked a socialist friend he knew to design the state-subsidised canteens, called them ‘one of the greatest social revolutions that has taken place in the industry of our country’. Discussions were had in parliament about how the canteens produced astonishing improvements in workers' wellbeing. After the war Conservatives dismissed them in parliament because they weren’t making profit. The canteens were allowed to decline, then disappear. Now food deserts and food banks proliferate and people do not have enough food to live. It is a strange situation that, as food poverty surges, we forget that we built canteens, once. The wartime memory of eating that has been encouraged to survive is of rationing, of lack, but for many people, there had never been so much hot, filling food. A seat, a table, a glass of water, a plate of food with the calorie density to sustain a life for a good while; the space and the time in which to unfold. I dream of canteens.
UofWinds 
may 2019 by copystar
Chicago Finds a Way to Improve Public Housing: Libraries - The New York Times
I recently visited three sites that the Chicago Housing Authority has just or nearly completed. These small, community-enhancing, public-private ventures, built swiftly and well, are the opposite of Cabrini-Green and Robert Taylor. With a few dozen apartments each, they’re costlier per unit than the typical public housing developments, and they’re not going to make a big dent in a city with a dwindling population but a growing gap between the number of affordable apartments and the demand for them.

That said, they’re instructive. As Cabrini-Green and other isolated, troubled old mega-sites proved, bigger isn’t necessarily better. These are integrated works of bespoke architecture, their exceptional design central to their social and civic agenda.

And they share another distinctive feature, too: each project includes a new branch library (“co-location” is the term of art). The libraries are devised as outward-facing hubs for the surrounding neighborhoods, already attracting a mix of toddlers, retirees, after-school teens, job-seekers, not to mention the traditional readers, nappers and borrowers of DVDs.

Co-location is of course not a new idea. Other cities today link subsidized housing developments with libraries, New York included, but Chicago’s outgoing mayor, Rahm Emanuel, has made a point of touting the concept, and seeing it through in ways other mayors haven’t.
via:shannon_mattern  UofWinds 
may 2019 by copystar
Agnotology and Epistemological Fragmentation – Data & Society: Points
You all believe in knowledge. You believe in making sure the public is informed. You understand that knowledge emerges out of contestation, debate, scientific pursuit, and new knowledge replacing old knowledge. Scholars are obsessed with nuance. Producers of knowledge are often obsessed with credit and ownership. All of this is being exploited to undo knowledge today. You will not achieve an informed public simply by making sure that high quality content is publicly available and presuming that credibility is enough while you wait for people to come find it. You have to understand the networked nature of the information war we’re in, actively be there when people are looking, and blanket the information ecosystem with the information people need to make informed decisions."
UofWinds 
may 2019 by copystar
Stoicism’s Appeal to the Rich and Powerful – Ex Urbe
Stoicism caught on among Roman elites because it was the one form of philosophical guidance that didn’t urge them to renounce wealth or power. Politics is stressful, but rather than giving it up to live like a monk or a dog, stoicism says you should continue the hard work seek to attain an inner attitude in which you will not suffer misery when you do fail, when you do lose the election, face the criticism, suffer the setback, feel the blows of fortune. Stoicism alone recommended inner detachment, not walking away. For Roman patrician statesmen with long family traditions of political leadership, walking away from civic participation was a non-starter (especially since Roman ancestor worship meant that achieving a name in politics was also a religious duty which your very afterlife depended on!). Stoicism finally offered a philosophical ethics useful to the statesman, which is why Cicero–a skeptic who engaged with many sects of philosophy–favors it in his dialogs more consistently than any other sect (this may not sound like a strong endorsement but is a high a very high bar for Cicero. And Cicero is a very big deal).
UofWinds 
march 2019 by copystar
upstream//data 2.0.4
This infinity mirror of data and metadata can be exhausting for people who are trying to decide exactly what to record about a thing. Right now, a cataloguer at a library holds an old book in her hands which has just arrived as a donation. There are so very many things that she could enter into the catalogue about the book, for a book is a thing with a particular penchant for producing data. The number of pages, the type of binding, the typefaces used to set the text, the presence of a dust jacket - all of this before we get to whatever it is that the author might have to say. As a means of sanity for the cataloguer and as a defense against bloated databases and overstuffed card catalogues, the library has defined a particular set of things that the cataloguer should record about the book: the title, the author, the publisher, the year, all of the things we might expect to find listed in a bibliography. There is simply no means for our cataloguer to add more data than what is allowed: that the book in her hands smells vaguely of campfire smoke is of no business at all to the database.
UofWinds 
march 2019 by copystar
watermark woodcut indigo octavo
book history

1670. Introduction of the hollander.

1720. Perfection of the vignette illustration.

1734. Caslon type introduced.

1750 (circ.). The first coth-backed paper (used only for maps).

1750 (circ.). Gradual disappearance of vellum for binding and introduction of millboard covered with calf; or half-covered with leather and half with marbled paper, etc. The first wove paper (Baskerville).

1763. Logwood inks probably first introduced.

1770. Indigo first used in inks (Eisler).
UofWinds 
march 2019 by copystar
Twitter
This is the best way to spot a trans person
UofWinds  from twitter_favs
march 2019 by copystar
Always On — Real Life
Millennials, of course, are not the first to feel a persistent sense of depletion. Among the historical antecedents, as Petersen notes, is neurasthenia, a nervous condition frequently diagnosed in the 19th century. Another antecedent is acedia, a combination of indifference, apathy, carelessness, self-loathing, and sleepiness that early Christian monks called the “noonday devil.” The term referred to an inability to get things done, especially the seemingly straightforward daily tasks it was a monk’s duty to perform, such as reading and prayer. Over time, acedia slipped loose of the monastery and was supplanted by words like sloth or laziness, although ennui may best capture its spiritual valence.
UofWinds 
march 2019 by copystar
The Object, Offline – Yancey Strickler – Medium
This isn’t new to technology. Self-portraits and collaborative creation have always existed. Arguably the first Kickstarter project was in 1713 by Alexander Pope, to translate the Iliad into English.

To fund the work, Pope received support from 700 subscribers. They got their name in the first edition.
UofWinds 
march 2019 by copystar
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