copystar + uofwinds   662

Laughing Kaiju – Raph makes games
Other games

They Say You Should Talk To Your Plants: a game about dealing with life by talking to your plants, where you also play the plants. Winner of Golden Cobra award for "Best Use of Silence or Non-Verbal Elements in a Game"
Your Ancestors Are Watching: a tragic tale of ancestral mechs for #sadmechjam
The Tiny Book of Storygames for First Dates
Other People: 2018 Golden Cobra entry
Plotypus: a fun & quick hero's journey (with the wonderful Randy Lubin)
games  UofWinds 
5 weeks ago by copystar
Caught in the Spotlight | Urban Omnibus
RT @hypervisible: New essay out, on “luxury” vs. “imposed” surveillance.
UofWinds  ring 
5 weeks ago by copystar
Paper Computers
Paper computing (see Kirschenbaum) and paper prototyping are relevant to present-day project design and development because they provide us with a sense of history while bypassing widespread tendencies to focus on whiz-bang technologies, which may demand significant resources that are not exactly accessible.Some ways to prototype historical texts: imitation (labour of the text), forgery (economy of the text), scenario (interaction through the text), story (performance of the text), counterfactual (norms of the text), model (logic of the text), glitch (negotiations with the text), and wish (ideology of the text). I’ll elaborate during seminar. They are conducive to various humanities methods (e.g., remediation and versioning), too, and they stress how people interact with materials. Speculative design (see Dunne and Raby and Lukens and DiSalvo) is useful since it puts design first, rather than treating it as the last step (“polishing” or “finishing”) of a project. It also privileges conjecture over proof while corresponding meaningfully with studies of speculative fiction, science fiction, fantasy, and futurisms, such as Afrofuturisms (see Nelson), Indigenous Futurisms (see Dillon), and near futures (see Bleecker et al.).
cards  games  todo  UofWinds 
6 weeks ago by copystar
How William Gibson Keeps His Science Fiction Real | The New Yorker
In his late twenties, Gibson earned an English degree at the University of British Columbia. He took a class taught by the feminist sci-fi pioneer Susan Wood; she suggested that, instead of writing an analytical paper, he might turn in a story of his own. (At her urging, he sold the story, “Fragments of a Hologram Rose,” to a small magazine.) He began writing science fiction in earnest only when Graeme was on the way, and it seemed to him that his career had to start, or else. Deborah was in grad school, so he took care of the baby, writing “Neuromancer” while Graeme napped. He learned to work iteratively. He still rereads his manuscripts from the beginning each day—an increasing burden, as each book goes on—stripping away what’s superfluous and squirrelling new ideas into the gaps. (Having shown a technology used properly in one scene, he might show someone misusing it in another.) His plots are Tetris-like, their components snapping together at the last possible moment until the space of the novel is filled.
UofWinds 
6 weeks ago by copystar
nanDECK - a Software for Card Games Designers
nanDECK is a software for Windows (any version) written as an aid for game inventors, with the aim of speeding up the process of designing and printing deck of cards (useful during prototyping and playtesting).
UofWinds 
6 weeks ago by copystar
Wingspan – Stonemaier Games
This is a game that does not demand attention but it rewards it. Just like birdwatching.
UofWinds 
8 weeks ago by copystar
Nine Lies About Work - Marcus Buckingham
"We tend to think that subjectivity in data is a bug, and that the feature we’re after is objectivity. Actually, however, when it comes to measurement, the pursuit of objectivity is the bug, and reliable subjectivity the feature. These questions generate reliable (and subjective) data, and while this isn’t everything, it’s a lot. "
UofWinds 
8 weeks ago by copystar
Dreidel: A Seemingly Foolish Game That Contains the Moral World in Miniature | The MIT Press Reader
Of course, it also feels bad always to be the most generous one, always to put in big, take out small, always to let others win the rules arguments, and so forth, to play the sucker or self-sacrificing saint. Dreidel, then, is a practical lesson in discovering the value of fairness both to oneself and to others, in a context in which the rules are unclear, there are norm violations that aren’t rules violations, and both norms and rules are negotiable, varying by occasion — just like life itself, only with mediocre chocolate at stake. I can imagine no better way to spend a holy evening.
UofWinds 
9 weeks ago by copystar
Yap
a place for friends

yap is an ephemeral, real-time chat room with up to six participants. your messages appear and disappear as quickly as you type them, which means unless you pay attention to what everyone says (for once), you’ll miss it. after creating a room, you can embed a piece of media (a video, a website, or something else) for your group to discuss or just shoot the sh*t.
UofWinds 
10 weeks ago by copystar
Webrecorder | Homepage
Webrecorder.io is a web archiving service to collect and revisit web pages.
UofWinds 
november 2019 by copystar
Spadework | Issue 34 | n+1
We were all too busy, but the too-busyness wasn’t really about time, or at least not only. Being too busy meant people didn’t see why the union was worth making time for. Your job as an organizer was to find out what it was that people wanted to be different in their lives, and then to persuade people that it mattered whether they decided to do something about it. This is not the same thing as persuading people that the thing itself matters: they usually know it does. The task is to persuade people that they matter: they know they usually don’t.
UofWinds 
november 2019 by copystar
Get an Emdash
I keep forgetting the key command for an emdash on Windows so I made a website to copy one. You can use it to:
UofWinds  from twitter_favs
october 2019 by copystar
Radical Networks 2019 on Livestream
wow this went up real quick–my talk from yesterday on quartz crystals is here
UofWinds  from twitter_favs
october 2019 by copystar
Garbage can model - Wikipedia
While still a doctoral student at the University of Bergen in Norway, Johan P. Olsen came to the University of California, Irvine as a visiting scholar from 1968-1969.[4] At that time, James G. March was both the Dean of the School of Social Sciences (1964–1969), and a professor of psychology and sociology at the University of California, Irvine (1964–1970).[5] Coinciding with the time of Olsen's visit, and March's last year serving as a dean, Michael D. Cohen was a doctoral student at the University of California, Irvine, and was just beginning his work as a research assistant to March.[6] All three scholars were present at the right time, to witness the university conduct a search process to hire a new dean. Ultimately, the search process ended with none of the potential candidates being chosen, and the head of the search committee taking the position of dean. During an interview, Olsen describes the chaotic decision-making process that he observed at the university throughout this search process, and how it served as a foundational experience for the three scholars to later collaborate and produce their model.[7] Olsen explains in this interview how topics previously considered to be important to the decision making process, such as if the actors were reasonable or rational, actually proved to be less important, and were instead trumped by issues such as time constraints of the participants involved. An example provided was a professor being present in one meeting, only to be absent from the following meeting due to professional travel commitments, which can be common for university faculty. This prompted Olsen to consider a contextual model of decision making, one that examined the ability to make calculations and implement them, as opposed to models that focused on motivation. Olsen observed decision makers give each other head nods, and other non-verbal communication, in meetings, and noted the possible communication, or miscommunication this may have entailed. Olsen also highlighted how the search committee's decision-making process was affected by misinterpreting the silence of the current dean (March) regarding applicants as a sign for lack of support, when in fact this was not an accurate interpretation of the dean's preferences. Olsen, therefore, gained an interest to examine collective, as opposed to individual, decision making, and how routines and chance may affect the decision-making process.[7] All of these factors would lead into the development of the garbage can model.
UofWinds 
october 2019 by copystar
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