copystar + uofwinds   638

Caught in the Spotlight | Urban Omnibus
RT @hypervisible: New essay out, on “luxury” vs. “imposed” surveillance.
UofWinds 
10 days ago by copystar
How William Gibson Keeps His Science Fiction Real | The New Yorker
In his late twenties, Gibson earned an English degree at the University of British Columbia. He took a class taught by the feminist sci-fi pioneer Susan Wood; she suggested that, instead of writing an analytical paper, he might turn in a story of his own. (At her urging, he sold the story, “Fragments of a Hologram Rose,” to a small magazine.) He began writing science fiction in earnest only when Graeme was on the way, and it seemed to him that his career had to start, or else. Deborah was in grad school, so he took care of the baby, writing “Neuromancer” while Graeme napped. He learned to work iteratively. He still rereads his manuscripts from the beginning each day—an increasing burden, as each book goes on—stripping away what’s superfluous and squirrelling new ideas into the gaps. (Having shown a technology used properly in one scene, he might show someone misusing it in another.) His plots are Tetris-like, their components snapping together at the last possible moment until the space of the novel is filled.
UofWinds 
12 days ago by copystar
nanDECK - a Software for Card Games Designers
nanDECK is a software for Windows (any version) written as an aid for game inventors, with the aim of speeding up the process of designing and printing deck of cards (useful during prototyping and playtesting).
UofWinds 
13 days ago by copystar
Wingspan – Stonemaier Games
This is a game that does not demand attention but it rewards it. Just like birdwatching.
UofWinds 
26 days ago by copystar
Nine Lies About Work - Marcus Buckingham
"We tend to think that subjectivity in data is a bug, and that the feature we’re after is objectivity. Actually, however, when it comes to measurement, the pursuit of objectivity is the bug, and reliable subjectivity the feature. These questions generate reliable (and subjective) data, and while this isn’t everything, it’s a lot. "
UofWinds 
26 days ago by copystar
Dreidel: A Seemingly Foolish Game That Contains the Moral World in Miniature | The MIT Press Reader
Of course, it also feels bad always to be the most generous one, always to put in big, take out small, always to let others win the rules arguments, and so forth, to play the sucker or self-sacrificing saint. Dreidel, then, is a practical lesson in discovering the value of fairness both to oneself and to others, in a context in which the rules are unclear, there are norm violations that aren’t rules violations, and both norms and rules are negotiable, varying by occasion — just like life itself, only with mediocre chocolate at stake. I can imagine no better way to spend a holy evening.
UofWinds 
5 weeks ago by copystar
Yap
a place for friends

yap is an ephemeral, real-time chat room with up to six participants. your messages appear and disappear as quickly as you type them, which means unless you pay attention to what everyone says (for once), you’ll miss it. after creating a room, you can embed a piece of media (a video, a website, or something else) for your group to discuss or just shoot the sh*t.
UofWinds 
6 weeks ago by copystar
Webrecorder | Homepage
Webrecorder.io is a web archiving service to collect and revisit web pages.
UofWinds 
10 weeks ago by copystar
Spadework | Issue 34 | n+1
We were all too busy, but the too-busyness wasn’t really about time, or at least not only. Being too busy meant people didn’t see why the union was worth making time for. Your job as an organizer was to find out what it was that people wanted to be different in their lives, and then to persuade people that it mattered whether they decided to do something about it. This is not the same thing as persuading people that the thing itself matters: they usually know it does. The task is to persuade people that they matter: they know they usually don’t.
UofWinds 
11 weeks ago by copystar
Get an Emdash
I keep forgetting the key command for an emdash on Windows so I made a website to copy one. You can use it to:
UofWinds  from twitter_favs
october 2019 by copystar
Radical Networks 2019 on Livestream
wow this went up real quick–my talk from yesterday on quartz crystals is here
UofWinds  from twitter_favs
october 2019 by copystar
Garbage can model - Wikipedia
While still a doctoral student at the University of Bergen in Norway, Johan P. Olsen came to the University of California, Irvine as a visiting scholar from 1968-1969.[4] At that time, James G. March was both the Dean of the School of Social Sciences (1964–1969), and a professor of psychology and sociology at the University of California, Irvine (1964–1970).[5] Coinciding with the time of Olsen's visit, and March's last year serving as a dean, Michael D. Cohen was a doctoral student at the University of California, Irvine, and was just beginning his work as a research assistant to March.[6] All three scholars were present at the right time, to witness the university conduct a search process to hire a new dean. Ultimately, the search process ended with none of the potential candidates being chosen, and the head of the search committee taking the position of dean. During an interview, Olsen describes the chaotic decision-making process that he observed at the university throughout this search process, and how it served as a foundational experience for the three scholars to later collaborate and produce their model.[7] Olsen explains in this interview how topics previously considered to be important to the decision making process, such as if the actors were reasonable or rational, actually proved to be less important, and were instead trumped by issues such as time constraints of the participants involved. An example provided was a professor being present in one meeting, only to be absent from the following meeting due to professional travel commitments, which can be common for university faculty. This prompted Olsen to consider a contextual model of decision making, one that examined the ability to make calculations and implement them, as opposed to models that focused on motivation. Olsen observed decision makers give each other head nods, and other non-verbal communication, in meetings, and noted the possible communication, or miscommunication this may have entailed. Olsen also highlighted how the search committee's decision-making process was affected by misinterpreting the silence of the current dean (March) regarding applicants as a sign for lack of support, when in fact this was not an accurate interpretation of the dean's preferences. Olsen, therefore, gained an interest to examine collective, as opposed to individual, decision making, and how routines and chance may affect the decision-making process.[7] All of these factors would lead into the development of the garbage can model.
UofWinds 
october 2019 by copystar
We need fewer theories of change and more community organizing | Nonprofit AF
Our ability to mobilize our community is one of the most important things we can do in light of growing injustice. We cannot white-paper our path to a just society. We cannot theory-of-change ourselves toward an inclusive community. And as many colleagues have pointed out, we also cannot program our way to an equitable world. Thinking and talking about issues and addressing the ongoing symptoms of injustice are pivotal to our work, but they cannot be our end goal, and our field may have forgotten that. We must simultaneously address the root causes of injustice, and the only way to do that effectively is through organizing. All of us, not just advocacy organizations.
UofWinds 
october 2019 by copystar
Against Waldenponding
But I've never tried to lay out exactly why I think this, or offer an alternative viewpoint based on a full-blown embrace of the digitally entangled information-wrangling life. The key element of the argument that I was missing so far, as I realized yesterday, is that retreating from information flows is just a different way of having your attention hacked by others. This argument is developed starting in point 25 below. If FOMO, Fear Of Missing Out, is the basic fear exploited by third parties that want to drown you in information, the basic fear exploited by people telling you to unplug and retreat is FOBO: Fear Of Being Ordinary. I didn't talk about FOBO in the live thread yesterday, but it's laid out in this expanded version.
UofWinds 
september 2019 by copystar
Venkatesh Rao on Twitter: "A megatrend hypothesis inspired by several microtrend that I think are related: a) waldenponding b) rise of heavy duty information management methods like @fortelabs BASB (build a second brain) c) conversational media eating aut
A megatrend hypothesis inspired by several microtrend that I think are related:

a) waldenponding
b) rise of heavy duty information management methods like @fortelabs
BASB (build a second brain)

c) conversational media eating authorial media

d) "hivebrain" jokes/references

ht Sentiers No.96
UofWinds 
september 2019 by copystar
Absolute scale corrupts absolutely - apenwarr
Here's what we've lost sight of, in a world where everything is Internet scale: most interactions should not be Internet scale. Most instances of most programs should be restricted to a small set of obviously trusted people. All those people, in all those foreign countries, should not be invited to read Equifax's PII database in Argentina, no matter how stupid the password was. They shouldn't even be able to connect to the database. They shouldn't be able to see that it exists.

It shouldn't, in short, be on the Internet.

On the other hand, properly authorized users, who are on the Internet, would like to be able to reach it from anywhere. Because requiring all the employees to come to an office location to do their jobs ("physical security") seems kinda obsolete.

That leaves us with a conundrum, doesn't it?
UofWinds 
september 2019 by copystar
Baba Is You
I love rule-changing games. I love Baba is You.
UofWinds  from twitter
september 2019 by copystar
Notes from a Small Press by annetrubek
The backlist--named after the place in a publisher catalog where the titles are listed--are books that were published at least six months earlier. Most sales for a book occur while they are on the frontlist (you probably can guess where that terms comes from), specifically during the first 90 days after publication date, though many of those sales occur in the month or two before publication, in those initial orders placed in anticipation. When a title is a frontlist, it's costing publishers money and time: we are paying off printing bills (usually the highest single expense), publicity costs, marketing, designers, proofreaders--all those items that are figured into the P&L, or profit-and-loss statement. And we are thinking about how to do all those things better, and biting our nails. But after six months or so, that time and those costs subside, and the book moves to the backlist. All the costs have been paid off, and it consumes less of our mental energy. Which means each time we sell a copy of a backlist title, a much higher percentage of the revenue goes straight to our bottom line. One backlist sale equals about three frontlist ones in my mind.
UofWinds 
september 2019 by copystar
#DilettanteInChief on Twitter: "Questions I regularly ask myself when I'm outraged about injustice: 1. What resources exist so I can better educate myself? 2. Who's already doing work around this injustice? 3. Do I have the capacity to offer concrete supp
Questions I regularly ask myself when I'm outraged about injustice:
1. What resources exist so I can better educate myself?
2. Who's already doing work around this injustice?
3. Do I have the capacity to offer concrete support & help to them?
4. How can I be constructive?
UofWinds  notebene 
september 2019 by copystar
Degrowth: A Call for Radical Abundance — Jason Hickel
It doesn’t have to be this way. We can call a halt to the madness – throw a wrench in the juggernaut. By de-enclosing social goods and restoring the commons, we can ensure that people are able to access the things that they need to live a good life without having to generate piles of income in order to do so, and without feeding the never-ending growth machine. “Private riches” may shrink, as Lauderdale pointed out, but public wealth will increase.

In this sense, degrowth is the very opposite of austerity. While austerity calls for scarcity in order to generate growth, degrowth calls for abundance in order to render growth unnecessary.

Degrowth, at its core, is a demand for radical abundance.
ht https://thoughtshrapnel.com/2019/06/18/symmetry/
notebene  UofWinds 
september 2019 by copystar
Don’t ask forgiveness, radiate intent - Elizabeth Ayer - Medium
Here are 4 reasons that radiating intent is better than begging forgiveness:

Radiating intent gives a chance for someone to stop you before you do a thing, in case it’s truly harmful
Radiating intent gives people who have information, or want to help, an opening to participate
Radiating intent leaves better evidence of your good will
Radiating intent shows others that adventurous behavior is acceptable in the org.

ht https://thoughtshrapnel.com/2019/07/05/friday-frustrations/
UofWinds 
september 2019 by copystar
Benefits of Weight Training: 3 Reasons Why You Should Lift Weights
Just had a great talk about the value of sports vs. reading in life. Have you learned more from pushing yourself physically or mentally?

Many of you sent in great answers, but I particularly liked this one from Tom…

Not sure which — there's tremendous value in each. Mental teaches you about others, physical teaches you about yourself.

Tom explained what I hadn't quite been able to put my finger on: there is an incredible amount to be learned from both reading and playing sports, but you'll learn more about yourself when you push yourself physically. [evidently Shopclass as soulcraft makes a similar argument - when you must work with material that will not give]
UofWinds  notebene 
september 2019 by copystar
Finishing side projects - macwright.org
This is part of the Yerkes-Dodson Law – that being a little nervous helps, but true and complete anticipation decreases your performance.

Thinking back to the many projects I had written without an ounce of planning - geojson.io, simple-statistics, documentation - I certainly have regrets, so many regrets, about some of their implementations, but could I have sussed out a correct plan at the beginning and avoided rewrites and flaws? Not really. Some would have benefited from an ounce of planning, but with any more than that I might’ve scared myself off.
UofWinds 
august 2019 by copystar
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