copystar + quotation   61

zemblanity - Google Search
William Boyd coined the term zemblanity in the late twentieth century to mean somewhat the opposite of serendipity: "making unhappy, unlucky and expected discoveries occurring by design".[16] A zemblanity is, effectively, an "unpleasant unsurprise". It derives from Novaya Zemlya (or Nova Zembla), a cold, barren land with many features opposite to the lush Sri Lanka (Serendip).
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23 days ago by copystar
3 ideas, 2 quotes, 1 question (December 5, 2019) | James Clear
“You are only entitled to the action, never to its fruits.”

Source: Bhagavad Gita, chapter 2, verse 47​​
quotation 
7 weeks ago by copystar
ursula-k-le-guin-a-non-euclidean-view-of-california-as-a-cold-place-to-be - 1989a_Le-Guin_non-Euclidean-view-California.pdf
What do you do with her in Walden Two?

Utopia has been euclidean, it has been European, and it has been masculine. I am trying to suggest, in an evasive, distrustful, untrustworthy fashion, and as obscurely as I can, that our final loss of faith in that radiant sandcastle may enable our eyes to adjust to a dimmer light and in it perceive another kind of utopia. As this utopia would not be euclidean, European, or masculinist, my terms and images in speaking of it must be tentative and seem peculiar. Victor Turner’s antitheses of structure and communitas are useful to my attempt to think about it: structure in society, in his terms, is cognitive, communitas existential; structure provides a model, communitas a potential; structure classifies, communitas reclassifies; structure is expressed in legal and political institutions, communitas in art and religion.
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7 weeks ago by copystar
The Efficiency-Destroying Magic of Tidying Up – Florent Crivello
This is a special case of Chesterton’s Fence, which states you should never take down a fence before knowing why it was put up. Here, I propose Scott’s Law: never put order in a system before you understand the structure underneath its chaos.
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november 2019 by copystar
All models are wrong - Wikipedia
"All models are wrong" is a common aphorism in statistics; it is often expanded as "All models are wrong, but some are useful".
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september 2019 by copystar
September 2019 Tarot Offering -
written by psychologist Jay Efran that included the unattributed quote, “you can never get enough of what you don’t really need,”
quotation 
september 2019 by copystar
That Nature is a Heraclitean Fire and of the comfort of the Resurrection by Gerard Manley Hopkins | Poetry Foundation
Down roughcast, down dazzling whitewash, | wherever an elm arches,
Shivelights and shadowtackle ín long | lashes lace, lance, and pair.
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september 2019 by copystar
Ivan Chtcheglov - Wikipedia
Ivan wrote Formulaire pour un urbanisme nouveau (Formulary for a New Urbanism) in 1953, at age nineteen under the name Gilles Ivain, which was an inspiration to the Lettrist International. and Situationist International The following quotation from the text was used as the inspiration for the famous Manchester nightclub, the Haçienda:

"And you, forgotten, your memories ravaged by all the consternations of two hemispheres, stranded in the Red Cellars of Pali-Kao, without music and without geography, no longer setting out for the hacienda where the roots think of the child and where the wine is finished off with fables from an old almanac. That’s all over. You’ll never see the hacienda. It doesn’t exist.

The hacienda must be built."[1]
quotation 
september 2019 by copystar
American-Born Confused Desi - Wikipedia
The longer and lesser known form "American Born Confused Desi, Emigrated From Gujarat, House In Jersey" is also occasionally seen; playing on the alphabet theme, it has been expanded for K-Z variously as "Kids Learning Medicine, Now Owning Property, Quite Reasonable Salary, Two Uncles Visiting, White Xenophobia, Yet Zestful" or "Keeping Lotsa Motels, Named Omkarnath Patel, Quickly Reaching Success Through Underhanded Vicious Ways, Xenophobic Yet Zestful".[3] The former version of the A—Z expansion was proposed by South Asian immigrants as a reaction to the latter version that derogated them.[4]
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may 2019 by copystar
Endless Maps and Graphs
We need to get out of the persuasion business and start getting into the magic business, or the catalysis business, or the magnetizing business, or whatever you want to call it. Using reason isn’t wrong. But with objects this huge, this massively distributed, this counterintuitive, this transdimensional, it’s not enough simply to use art as candy coating on top of facts. We can’t just be in the PR business. Percy Shelley put it beautifully when he wrote, “We lack the creative faculty to imagine that which we know.” That was back in 1820, and it’s only gotten worse. Consider the heavy hydrocarbons that subtend the soil of the Lago Agrio oil field in Ecuador, a black fudge hyperobject that oozes into drinking water, with unknown and under-studied mutagenic and carcinogenic effects. We do not need to keep on parsing the data like Chevron, the defendants in the lawsuit on behalf of the people affected by the contaminated soil. Such parsing of data would be using the very same tactic as the gigantic corporation, the strategy of producing endless maps and graphs. (Morton, 2013, pp 181-182).
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april 2019 by copystar
Anatole France, Updated
The law, in its majestic equality, forbids the rich and poor alike to sleep under bridges, to beg in the streets, and to steal bread.
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march 2019 by copystar
Jonathan Solomon on Twitter: "“A good science fiction story should be able to predict not the automobile but the traffic jam” —Frederik Pohl… "
“A good science fiction story should be able to predict not the automobile but the traffic jam” —Frederik Pohl
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march 2019 by copystar
Quote by Kurt Vonnegut: “What should young people do with their lives to...” | Goodreads
“What should young people do with their lives today? Many things, obviously. But the most daring thing is to create stable communities in which the terrible disease of loneliness can be cured.”
quotation  loneliness 
february 2019 by copystar
Music Monday: Masakatsu Takagi | Spoon & Tamago
The holiday season always seems to be more hectic than it should be. In fact, Japan’s ancient word for December is shiwasu (師走), which is literally “teacher run” because this month is so busy that even the priests have to pray while running.
quotation 
december 2018 by copystar
Enantiodromia - Wikipedia
Enantiodromia (Ancient Greek: ἐνάντιος,, translit. enantios – opposite and δρόμος, dromos – running course) is a principle introduced in the West by psychiatrist Carl Jung. In Psychological Types, Jung defines enantiodromia as "the emergence of the unconscious opposite in the course of time. This characteristic phenomenon practically always occurs when an extreme, one-sided tendency dominates conscious life; in time an equally powerful counterposition is built up which first inhibits the conscious performance and subsequently breaks through the conscious control."[1] It is similar to the principle of equilibrium in the natural world, in that any extreme is opposed by the system in order to restore balance. When things get to their extreme, they turn into their opposite
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december 2018 by copystar
Apophenia | Definition of Apophenia by Merriam-Webster
: the tendency to perceive a connection or meaningful pattern between unrelated or random things (such as objects or ideas)

What psychologists call apophenia—the human tendency to see connections and patterns that are not really there—gives rise to conspiracy theories. —George Johnson
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june 2018 by copystar
Cunningham's Law - Meta
Cunningham's Law states "the best way to get the right answer on the internet is not to ask a question; it's to post the wrong answer."

The concept is named after Ward Cunningham, father of the wiki. According to Steven McGeady,[1] the law's author, Wikipedia may be the most well-known demonstration of this law.[2]

Cunningham's Law can be considered the Internet equivalent of the French saying "prêcher le faux pour savoir le vrai" (preach the falsehood to know the truth). In "Duty Calls," xkcd references a similar concept.[3]
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november 2017 by copystar
When small men begin to cast big shadows, it means that the sun is about to set. - Twitter Search
When small men begin to cast big shadows, it means that the sun is about to set LIN YUTANG (1895-1976)
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october 2017 by copystar
Filtered for non-human earths (11 Sep., 2017, at Interconnected)
The "Bärenschliffe" are smooth, polished and often shining surfaces, thought to be caused by passing bears, rubbing their fur along the walls. These surfaces do not only occur in narrow passages, where the bear would come into contact with the walls, but also at corners or rocks in wider passages.
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september 2017 by copystar
Strong Female Protagonist: Book Two by Molly Ostertag — Kickstarter
"Lightbulbs are glorious, batteries are honorable, and we have a hard time seeing the value in the latter."
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august 2017 by copystar
William Gibson Talks ‘Archangel,’ Apocalypses, and Dystopias
We have very little control over anything much at all, individually, so fantasies of staving off the end of the world are fairly benign fantasies of increased agency.
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august 2017 by copystar
Twilight - Wikipedia
Lawmakers have enshrined the concept of civil twilight. Such statutes typically use a fixed period after sunset or before sunrise (most commonly 20–30 minutes), rather than how many degrees the sun is below the horizon. Examples include the following periods: when drivers of automobiles must turn on their headlights (called lighting-up time in the UK); when hunting is restricted; when the crime of burglary is to be treated as nighttime burglary, which carries stiffer penalties in some jurisdictions.
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july 2017 by copystar
The Road Allowance People - The UC Observer
The Road Allowance People were the Métis, who, without a homeland, were forced to build homes and communities on the crown land known as “road allowance” land set aside for a highway. They lived a precarious existence, welcome neither in white settlements nor allowed to live on Treaty land. The Crown land, of course, could be appropriated or developed at any time; people were often burned out of their homes or otherwise forced to move.
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july 2017 by copystar
Inherent vice (library and archival science) - Wikipedia
Inherent vice is the tendency in physical objects to deteriorate because of the fundamental instability of the components of which they are made, as opposed to deterioration caused by external forces.[1][2] All objects have some kind of inherent vice as a result of the baseline law of entropy.
libraries  quotation 
june 2017 by copystar
Not in isolation | A Working Library
This is a fundamental view of the world. It says that when you build a thing, you cannot merely build that thing in isolation, but must also repair the world around it, and within it, so that the larger world at one place becomes more coherent, and more whole; and the thing which you make takes its place in the web of nature, as you make it.
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june 2017 by copystar
“Personal kanban”: a time-management system that explodes the myth of multitasking — Quartz
In an industrial setting, Kanban (which means “signboard” or “billboard” in Japanese, as a recent Medium post explains)
quotation  cards 
june 2017 by copystar
Frank Ostaseski: What the Dying Teach the Living - The Long Now
James Baldwin: “Not everything that can be faced can be changed, but nothing can be changed that is not faced.”
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may 2017 by copystar
L'appel du vide - Wikipedia
L'appel du vide, literally "the call of the void", is a French phrase used to refer to intrusive thoughts, or the urge to engage in destructive behaviors during everyday life.[1] Examples include thinking about swerving in to the opposite lane while driving, or feeling the urge to jump off a cliff edge while standing on it.
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may 2017 by copystar
The struggle with the self
I considered that for a minute, then tentatively asked, “Which wolf will win?”
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may 2017 by copystar
Rhetorics of the Web: Burke's "Unending Conversation" Metaphor
Kenneth Burke writes: Imagine that you enter a parlor. You come late. When you arrive, others have long preceded you, and they are engaged in a heated discussion, a discussion too heated for them to pause and tell you exactly what it is about. In fact, the discussion had already begun long before any of them got there, so that no one present is qualified to retrace for you all the steps that had gone before. You listen for a while, until you decide that you have caught the tenor of the argument; then you put in your oar. Someone answers; you answer him; another comes to your defense; another aligns himself against you, to either the embarrassment or gratification of your opponent, depending upon the quality of your ally's assistance. However, the discussion is interminable. The hour grows late, you must depart. And you do depart, with the discussion still vigorously in progress.

(Philosophy of Literary Form (University of California press), 110
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may 2017 by copystar
Do-Gooder Derogation - , 2011
These studies empirically document the backlash reported by moral minorities and trace it back to resentment by the mainstream against feeling morally judged.
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april 2017 by copystar
How Libraries Can Trump the Trend to Make America Hate Again
"If you are trying to drive up a hill, neutral is basically the same as reverse"
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april 2017 by copystar
Online Etymology Dictionary
wich (n.)
"salt works, salt pit," Old English wic, apparently a specialized use of the wic that means "dwelling place, town" (see wick (n.2)).
quotation 
april 2017 by copystar
Online Etymology Dictionary
sandwich (n.)
1762, said to be a reference to John Montagu (1718-1792), Fourth Earl Sandwich, who was said to be an inveterate gambler who ate slices of cold meat between bread at the gaming table during marathon sessions rather than get up for a proper meal (this account dates to 1770). It was in his honor that Cook named the Hawaiian islands (1778) when Montagu was first lord of the Admiralty. The family name is from the place in Kent, Old English Sandwicæ, literally "sandy harbor (or trading center)." For pronunciation, see cabbage. Sandwich board, one carried before and one behind, is from 1864.
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april 2017 by copystar
Quotations about the Internet
"Inside every working anarchy, there's an Old Boy Network."
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april 2017 by copystar
You May Also Like: Taste in an Age of Endless Choice - Tom Vanderbilt - Google Books
"salt, which so vital to the human endeavor that it informs town names like Salzburg and those English burghs with "wich" (brine pits were known as "wich houses" as their suffix...
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january 2017 by copystar
Why Do Canadians Say 'Eh'? | Atlas Obscura
“Eh” is what’s known as an invariant tag—something added on to the end of a sentence that’s the same every time it’s used. A tag, in linguistics, is a word or sound or short phrase added after a thought which changes that thought in some way. The most common tags are question tags, which change a thought into a question. “It’s a nice day, isn’t it?” would be one example. The tag “isn’t it” turns that statement of fact into something that could prompt a response; the speaker is asking for confirmation or rejection.
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january 2017 by copystar
Hawthorne effect - Wikipedia
The Hawthorne effect (also referred to as the observer effect[1]) is a type of reactivity in which individuals modify or improve an aspect of their behavior in response to their awareness of being observed.[2][3] The original research at the Hawthorne Works in Cicero, Illinois, on lighting changes and work structure changes such as working hours and break times were originally interpreted by Elton Mayo and others to mean that paying attention to overall worker needs would improve productivity. Later interpretations such as that done by Landsberger suggested that the novelty of being research subjects and the increased attention from such could lead to temporary increases in workers' productivity. This interpretation was dubbed "the Hawthorne effect".
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january 2017 by copystar
Protagoras - Wikipedia
Protagoras (/proʊˈtæɡərəs/; Greek: Πρωταγόρας; c. 490 – c. 420 BC)[1] was a pre-Socratic Greek philosopher and is numbered as one of the sophists by Plato. In his dialogue, Protagoras, Plato credits him with having invented the role of the professional sophist.

He also is believed to have created a major controversy during ancient times through his statement that, "Man is the measure of all things", interpreted by Plato to mean that there is no absolute truth, but that which individuals deem to be the truth. Although there is reason to question the extent of the interpretation of his arguments that has followed, that concept of individual relativity was revolutionary for the time, and contrasted with other philosophical doctrines that claimed the universe was based on something objective, outside of human influence or perceptions.
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january 2017 by copystar
Goodhart's law - Wikipedia
Goodhart's law is named after economist Charles Goodhart, paraphrasing: "When a measure becomes a target, it ceases to be a good measure."
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january 2017 by copystar
Why Moral Leaders Are Annoying - Brainiac
Once you know how to spot it, "anticipated reproach" is everywhere, and it bedevils people who want to lead morally. Argue on behalf of an environmental cause, and non-environmentalists, anticipating your moral reproach, will think you're stuck-up and self-righteous.
quotation  UofWinds 
december 2016 by copystar
Francis Drake - Wikipedia
Sic Parvis Magna, translated literally: "Thus great things from small things (come)"
quotation 
december 2016 by copystar
Twitter
Hannah Arendt on why she writes / me on why I tweet
quotation  from twitter_favs
december 2016 by copystar
Eduard C. Lindeman - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
"...the approach to adult education will be via the route of situations, not subjects."

"Every social action group should at the same time be an adult education group, and I go even as far as to believe that all successful adult education groups sooner or later become social action groups." -- The Sociology of Adult Education (1945)

"Adult education is a co-operative venture in non-authoritarian, informal learning the chief purpose of which is to discover the meaning of experience; a quest of the mind which digs down to the roots of the preconceptions which formulate our conduct; a technique of learning for adults which makes education coterminous with life, and hence elevates living itself to the level of an experiment."
learning  quotation  games 
september 2016 by copystar
1037: Umwelt - explain xkcd
That XKCD comic that changes based on location is : explanation here
geo  quotation  from twitter_favs
june 2016 by copystar

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