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Scenes Unseen: The Summer of ’78
Scrollytelling photo story of recently rediscovered images that document New York City's parks in the summer of 1978. The photos "were the work of eight staff photographers whose pictures normally ran in The New York Times, but who were idled for nearly three months in 1978 by a strike at the city’s newspapers." (Source: The New York Times)
may 2018
How Music Taste Evolved
Interactive timeline that plays "[e]very top 5 song, from 1958 - 2016, so we can stop arguing about when music was still good." (Source: The Pudding)
may 2018
Rhythm of Food
Visualization of food trends from Google search data. The data is plotted on a year clock to show common patterns and seasons for each year. (Source: Google News Lab and Truth & Beauty)
may 2018
Everything that’s happened leading up to ‘Avengers: Infinity War’
Interactive breakdown of characters and narrative timelines across the Marvel Cinematic Universe movies -- because there are way too many of them and no one can keep track. (Source: The Washington Post)
may 2018
Op Doc: The Rebel Puppeteers of Sudan
Short, creatively-told doc about a unique act of resistance in war-torn Sudan: a web series featuring a puppet version of Omar al-Bashir. (Source: The New York Times - Op Docs)
may 2018
The Waiting Game
"Based on the real case files of five asylum seekers from five countries and interviews with the medical and legal professionals who evaluate and represent them, The Waiting Game is an experimental news game that lets you walk in the shoes of an asylum seeker, from the moment they choose to come to the United States to the final decision in the cases before an immigration judge." (Source: ProPublica)
april 2018
The Top Jobs Where Women Are Outnumbered by Men Named John
Data-driven story that makes a striking point about the number of women in positions of power. "In the corridors of American power, it can be as easy to find a man named John as it is to find a woman." (Source: The Upshot - The New York Times)
april 2018
The Washington Post: School Shootings Database
Data-driven piece on the number of children exposed to gun violence during school hours since Columbine. The story includes visualizations that show the number of students affected, their racial background and the median age of shooters. It also includes an interactive element that filters shootings by school, year and location. (Source: The Washington Post via Storybench)
april 2018
San Francisco Earthquake Seismic Gamble
Text-driven multimedia story shows how San Francisco's skyscrapers may be particularly at risk during an earthquake. The story interweaves a traditional written story with scrolling text, data visualizations and archival photos. (Source: The New York Times)
april 2018
Your Camera is Better Than What Legendary Photographers Used
Food for thought: "'Every famous photograph was made with a camera less advanced than the one you are using now,' Forbes writes. 'This is a quote I read a few months ago that’s stuck with me for quite some time. Ansel Adams didn’t have gear as advanced as what we have now. Neither did Henri Cartier-Bresson or W Eugene Smith or Saul Leiter.'" (Source: Ted Forbes via PetaPixel)
april 2018
‘We’re kids, but we’re also journalists’
20-minute web documentary on student journalists at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High and their coverage of the shootings at their school. The overall piece begins with a short text introduction before allowing viewers to play the full video. As the video plays, links appear to short profiles of the young journalists and to their work. (Source: The Washington Post)
april 2018
Old Toronto: Mapping Historical Photos
"Old Toronto is an open-source map tool created by Sidewalk Labs that provides block-by-block browsing of historic Toronto photographs." Users can filter the photos by a date range and search by address, neighborhood or intersection. (Source: Sidewalk Labs via Storybench)
april 2018
Why can't Hollywood make a good video game movie?
Scrollytelling piece that employs video game tropes while asking why video game movies are so bad. Embellished with 8-bit style web animation, the piece presents readers with a series of trick questions. It then gives the correct answers to those questions to explain the difficulties of adapting video games for the silver screen. (Source: The Washington Post via Jeremy Rue)
april 2018
Bread
Interactive web documentary that profiles six older women from different backgrounds through the lens of their common passion for bread making. Note: this piece has auto-playing audio. (Source: National Film Board of Canada via Rachel Cassandra)
april 2018
All of the Latest Filmmaking Tools From NAB 2018
A round-up of the new filmmaking gear and post-production tools introduced at NAB 2018––an annual trade show produced by the National Association of Broadcasters. (Source: No Film School)
april 2018
The Last Generation
Multimedia scrollytelling documentary on how rising sea levels affect the Marshall Islands' youngest residents. It begins with an introduction to the issue before letting users choose between the stories of three youth representing the past, present and future of the islands. (Source: PBS Frontline and The GroundTruth Project)
april 2018
Dirty Dollars
Toronto Star story investigates companies with poor environmental records that receive generous government funding––funding that far outweighs the fines they pay for polluting. The story begins with a flashy data-driven scrollytelling intro before breaking into a more traditional text piece. (Source: Toronto Star)
april 2018
Roxham Road
An immersive (360/VR) documentary on Roxham Road, "the location with the largest number of irregular border crossings by asylum seekers moving from the United States to Canada." (Source: National Film Board of Canada Interactive)
april 2018
4 Different Kinds of Light and How to Use Them in Your Cinematography
"Front light: Light that comes from behind you can be used to emphasize colors.
Sidelight: Light that comes from the side (90-degree angle) can be used to emphasize textures.
Backlight: Light that comes from in front of you can be used to emphasize shape. (Silhouettes)
Indirect light: Light that that is evenly dispersed over your subject may not overtly emphasize any one feature, but it can be used to soften shadows." (Source: Frans Lanting via No Film School)
april 2018
Fonts for Complex Data
Best practices around typography choices for different types of information. Smaller-sized text (used for things like source information at the bottom of graphs or long lists) require wider, screen-friendly fonts. To make aligning numbers easier, use tabular figures––numbers that don't vary in width. (Source: Hoefler & Co via Sidebar.io)
april 2018
The People, Places and Things Trump Has Praised on Twitter
An interactive index of the people, places and things President Trump has praised on Twitter since declaring his candidacy. Every quote is linked to the original tweet, with tweets made after his presidency highlighted in pink. Under certain entries, users can also choose to show/hide the insults the president has made of the same people, places and things. See also the companion piece: "The 425 People, Places and Things Donald Trump Has Insulted on Twitter." (Source: The New York Times - The Upshot)
april 2018
There's An Immigration Gap In How Latinos Perceive Discrimination
NPR multimedia piece that lets users guess the percentage of immigrant Latinos versus U.S.-born Latinos who say they have personally experienced discrimination. It includes a four-minute audio piece and a text piece. NPR put together another story about Black American perceptions of discrimination in a similar way; it's linked in the sidebar. (Source: NPR)
april 2018
The Four Days in 1968 That Reshaped D.C.
Scrollytelling piece that tells the story of the 1968 riots in D.C. and its lasting impact on Black communities in the city. The visually-driven story interweaves photos, videos, data-rich interactive maps, and text. (Source: The Washington Post)
april 2018
Color Hunt
A color palette inspiration resource. (Source: Color Hunt)
april 2018
Have you ever really seen the moon?
A well-edited video from The Atlantic Selects. Worth watching on its own, but also for the reminder to look up every once in a while. (Source: Wylie Overstreet and Alex Gorosh / The Atlantic Selects)
april 2018
Voice mails from students on school safety
The Washington Post set up a voice mail box and asked to students to call in and share their views on school safety in the aftermath of the Parkland attacks. The Post shared audio clips from eight of the messages, presenting them in text card format with portraits and animated audio waveforms. (Source: The Washington Post)
march 2018
Sync your calendar with the solar system
The New York Times created a calendar for space-related events. Readers can subscribe via Google calendar or the iOS calendar. Each event includes a short description and a link to a story with related information. (Source: The New York Times via Poynter)
march 2018
Trump Turnover
Post piece that compiles "all the notable departures that have taken place since Inauguration Day." Includes a dynamically-updating countdown of the days since the administration's last high-profile departure. (Source: The Washington Post)
march 2018
Easter Island Erosion
Scrollytelling NYT multimedia story chronicles the erosion of Easter Island's monuments. The piece incorporates looping video, text, maps, and photos. (Source: The New York Times)
march 2018
Cinematic Camera Moves To Try With A Gimbal
Several ideas to capture interesting shots of a subject using a gimbal: follow them from behind at a low-angle, from behind at eye level, from the side at eye level, from the front as you walk backwards; circle them to create a "orbit" shot; push in or pull out to create a "dolly" type shot. (Source: Matti Haapoja via No Film School)
march 2018
The Baby in the Plastic Bag
A multimedia long form narrative piece that begins with the discovery of a newborn baby in a plastic bag in an Oslo graveyard. Chapter by chapter, it tells the story of what happens next. Be warned: this piece contains autoplaying audio. (Source: Dagbladet)
march 2018
Seeing Earth from Outer Space
A scrollytelling piece chronicling the history of images of the earth from space and the satellites that make them possible. (Made me a little motion sick, but neat nevertheless.) (Source: The Pudding)
march 2018
Extensive Data Shows Punishing Reach of Racism for Black Boys
Data-driven piece that looks at the relationship between economic mobility and race. "Black boys raised in America, even in the wealthiest families and living in some of the most well-to-do neighborhoods, still earn less in adulthood than white boys with similar backgrounds, according to a sweeping new study that traced the lives of millions of children." Visualizations follow the lives of boys who grew up in poor and wealthy families and see where they ended up as adults, disaggregated by race. (Source: The Upshot - The New York Times)
march 2018
Can we talk about the gender pay gap?
Data-driven piece that explains the gender pay gap in several ways. It puts the gap in terms of how much time women spend working for free compared to men. It also breaks the gap down by profession and allows readers to enter their own profession to see how they compare. It investigates common claims about the pay gap using data visualizations. The piece ends by telling audiences how much women and men have made in the time they've spent reading. (Source: The Washington Post)
march 2018
Tech Trends for Journalism
The Future Today Institute released its 11th annual Tech Trends Report at SXSW and made several predictions for the media. Among these trends: investigative reporting on algorithms and big data; increased demand for computer-assisted reporting; voice interface for news (driven by the rise of smart-speakers); the use of crowdlearning tools like Google Trends to inform stories; "digital frailty"; and "radical transparency". (Source: Future Today Institute via Poynter)
march 2018
Working With Dark Light
Interactive graphic story uses a mixture of illustrations and filtered video to show how Puerto Rican artists are responding in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria. Midway through the story, users can choose whether to follow performers on a road trip or continue with the narrative. (Source: The Washington Post)
march 2018
Prisma: Tool for adding filters to video
Prisma is the tool used to add filters to the video in the above project. (Source: Prisma via The Washington Post)
march 2018
Bussed Out
In this scrollytelling multimedia piece, The Guardian investigates what happens when homeless people are given one-way tickets out of town. The story incorporates looping video, data visualizations, and video interviews. (Source: The Guardian)
march 2018
Oil to Die For
An interactive multimedia documentary exploring North Dakota's oil boom and the dangers it creates for its workers. The piece is told chapter by chapter and incorporates archival documents and an audio-augmented timeline. (Source: Black Gold Boom)
march 2018
2018 video typography trends
The trends for video typography this year include: using giant-sized text, layering text among elements in the video, masking visuals inside text, having text "interact" with the surrounding video, and breaking up text so it shows up on screen word-by-word. (Source: StudioBinder via CreativeBloq)
march 2018
Resources from NICAR 2018
Comprehensive set of tipsheets and links from presentations on reporting, data journalism, and multimedia tools. (Source: IRE)
march 2018
How journalists are using Spotify to circumvent press censorship
Journalists are teaming up with local artists in countries with strict press controls to turn stories into songs and disseminate them through streaming platforms, like Spotify. (Source: MediaMonks on Medium)
march 2018
The Disconnect
An "offline-only" magazine that requires users to turn off their Wi-Fi in order for stories to become accessible.
(The Disconnect via Alessandra Bergamin)
march 2018
Finding Home/Heln's First Year
Time follows an asylum-seeking Syrian refugee family from the birth of their daughter, Heln, to her first birthday. Their story is told in a visually-driven "scrollytelling" piece that presents conversations between Heln's mother and the reporter as text messages. (Source: Time)
march 2018
Portrait of a Family
Personal essay telling the story of the first gay couple in Canada to legally co-adopt children. Their story is told as scrolly photo essay that includes text, as well as music and natural sound. (Source: National Film Board of Canada/Legacies 150)
march 2018
Your interactive makes me sick
For those sensitive to motion for a variety of reasons, the unexpected movement in scollytelling and interactive features can cause problems. One tip to make these stories more accessible: ask for consent. That is, give your audience choices -- the choice to start and stop movement/animation and the choice to view a static version of the story. (Source: Source/Open News)
march 2018
Five clever tricks for better smartphone cinematography
Most useful tricks in this video: 1) Create POV shots by taping your phone in different places (on a door, on an object your subject picks up, on car tire, etc.); 2) for more natural skin tones, use a red highlighter to counteract the green tinge of a smartphone's flash; and 3) stabilize your camera by using a bit of clay to keep your phone in place. You can also use that clay in conjunction with a towel to create a cool "tracking" shot. (Source: Jordy Vandeput/Cinecom via No Film School)
march 2018
New tool, Tetra, can record your phone calls and make transcripts of them within minutes
According to Ren LaForme at Poynter, users can call someone from within Tetra and the AI-driven app will create a transcript of that call within a few minutes. "It even warns the receiver that you’re recording before the call starts (great for two-party consent states). While similar tools seem to struggle with phone and computer audio, Tetra proved to be reasonably accurate (I’d estimate about 90 percent) in our tests." (Source: Ren LaForme/Poynter)
march 2018
NYT breaks down "Shape of You" with motion graphics
Using animation and video interviews, The New York Times breaks down how Ed Sheeran's "Shape of You" came together. The piece creatively visualizes each musical element of the song with a motion graphic counterpart. (Source: The New York Times)
february 2018
BBC experiments with chat bots within articles
At the end of this article (and several others), BBC includes a bot-driven module called "Catch Me Up." It lets audiences pick from a set of questions like "How are the president's approval ratings?" and receive answers in a chat-like interface. (Source: BBC News via Nieman Lab)
february 2018
Vox kicks off new design-focused series with explainer on why phones are so addictive
Worth watching for several reasons. One, content: it explains how things like notifications, bright colors, infinite scrolling/autoplay make our phones addictive by design. (It also gives tips on how to change settings for a less addictive experience.) Two, style: visually, it plays with the idea of apps throughout the video. Three, it's the start of a new series called "By Design," a possible future source of design-related insights. (Source: Vox)
february 2018
Sin luz: Life without power
Interactive "scrollytelling" piece examines the aftermath of Hurricane Maria in Puerto Rico, focusing on the lingering effects that power outages have had on daily life across the island.
(Source: The Washington Post)
february 2018
Your train is delayed: Why?
New York Times explainer documentary on the politics behind the lack of maintenance on the New York City Subway. Visuals include toy train sets, a busker who breaks down bond issuance fees via song, and colorful, fast-paced graphics mixed with archival footage. (Source: The New York Times)
february 2018
Everything easy is hard again
A web designer reflects on how knowledge about the web fades and reemerges in cycles. He also argues that code has become less accessible and wonders how this affects young designers. (Source: Frank Chimero)
february 2018
Is feminist data visualization a thing?
According to statistician Heather Krause, "[f]eminist data visualization is (and must be) a thing because data, data analysis, and data visualization are never neutral. The premise that, if handled correctly, data can present neutral evidence, is deeply flawed. Culture is embedded into our data at every stage." (Source: Evergreen Data)
february 2018
Guardian US mobile innovation lab launches experimental interactive podcast player
"The player integrates visual elements—such as text messages, photographs, charts, and animations—into the listening experience." The listener sees these visual elements through a chat-like web interface. (Source: The Guardian)
february 2018
Where is Home: An interactive, scrollytelling documentary on Instagram
Where is Home takes advantage of Instagram's grids to create a scrollytelling documentary that explores the meaning of home. (Source: Ifeatu Nnaobi on Instagram via IDFA DocLab)
february 2018
The Atlantic's Life Timeline
Interactive piece from The Atlantic: users enter their birthday and are shown a personalized timeline of significant historical events from their lifetime. (Source: The Atlantic)
february 2018
In an era of video, podcasts struggle to break through on social media
Podcasters are using social video to reach audiences, newsletters to engage them, and Facebook groups and What's App to create community among them. "But all of these tactics are underscored by the fact that the behavior of podcast listening is the opposite of the flyby nature of Facebook or Twitter." (Source: Digiday)
february 2018
He predicted the 2016 fake news crisis. Now he's worried about an information apocalypse.
Technologist Aviv Ovadya "cautions that fast-developing tools powered by artificial intelligence, machine learning, and augmented reality tech could be hijacked and used by bad actors to imitate humans and wage an information war." (Source: Buzzfeed News)
february 2018
Snap Map will now live outside Snapchat
News organizations (and the general public) can now embed Snap Map content into websites or on social media platforms. Content can be embedded in three different ways: a story from an individual user, a series of stories from a specific event, or all the stories happening in a certain geographical location. Stories will disappear after 30 days. (Source: Wired)
february 2018
Bruises: the data we don't see
A look at a data visualization piece that used music and art to capture the impact the illness of a child has on a family. The designer asked: "Can a data visualization evoke empathy and activate us also at an emotional level, and not only at a cognitive one? Can looking at a data visualization make you feel part of a story of a human’s life?" (Source: Giorgia Lupi on Medium)
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february 2018
By The Bay
Multimedia site dedicated to demystifying local politics in the Bay Area. (Source: By The Bay)
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february 2018
Museums are finding creative ways to engage with their audience — a lesson newsrooms should emulate
Poynter shares innovative audience engagement efforts from museums that could serve as inspiration for journalists. Some efforts, like the Google Arts & Culture selfie experience, ask readers to reveal something about themselves in order to engage them in learning. Others build connections with audiences by asking for volunteers to collect and curate information. Others still go beyond museum walls, drawing attention to their work through public exhibitions and events. (Source: Poynter)
february 2018
The Atlantic is killing its comments in favor of a new Letters section to showcase reader feedback
"Adrienne LaFrance, editor of TheAtlantic.com, said that the move is designed to elevate the smartest feedback from its readers, both by incentivizing more thought-out responses over knee-jerk reactions and by making it easier for others to read them (which in turn improves the overall experience of reading TheAtlantic.com)." (Source: Nieman Lab)
february 2018
Podcast listeners really are the holy grail advertisers hoped they'd be
Apple's Podcast Analytics feature was released last month and the early numbers are reassuring podcasters and advertisers that "podcast listeners really are the hyper-engaged, super-supportive audiences that everyone hoped." (Source: Wired)
february 2018
The crisis in journalism is a wicked problem
Heather Chaplin, director of Journalism + Design at The New School, suggests that we rethink our approach to the crisis in journalism. "Can we give up looking for a solution and dedicate ourselves instead to a lifelong practice of observing, adjusting, intervening, and redesigning as needed?" (Source: Journalism + Design)
february 2018
With “Times in Person,” The New York Times puts its national journalists in front of local crowds
Times in Person is "an initiative that the paper’s national desk launched last year to send Times reporters back into communities they’ve already covered and engage with local readers." So far, the Times has done this with six stories and plans to do more in-person events in 2018. (Source: Nieman Lab)
february 2018
The Follower Factory: The New York Times interactive on social media fraud
This "scrollytelling" piece investigates the black market of fake followers, tracing the story of a teenager whose social identity is stolen. Through interactive graphics, the story explains how Twitter bots work, who buys followers, and how to recognize bot patterns in follower data. (Source: The New York Times via Storybench)
january 2018
With Left Field, NBC News experiments with VR, mixed reality, and other new story forms
"NBC Left Field, a 12-person experimental video unit, launched last July with a simple but strategically vital mandate: to experiment with new ways of reporting, producing, and delivering video news..." A recent Left Field experiment used Tilt Brush, Google’s virtual reality 3D painting technology, in a video on the reality of New Year’s resolutions. (Source: Nieman Lab)
january 2018
Google is testing Bulletin, a new app that would let anyone publish a local news story
Google describes Bulletin as "an app for contributing hyperlocal stories about your community, for your community, right from your phone." It's currently in a "limited pilot" in Nashville and Oakland. (Source: Slate)
january 2018
A UX designer with color-blindness shares his insights
Designing for color-blind users means thinking carefully about contrast and avoiding color-blind unfriendly combinations like green/red, purple/blue, and light green/yellow. (Source: Fei Ren via Sidebar.io)
january 2018
Facebook's news survey asks two questions
Facebook is retooling its News Feed to prioritize "trustworthy" publications and will use a two-question user survey to help determine that trustworthiness. The effort has been met with harsh questions, "[t]op among them is whether it's wise for Facebook to entrust decisions about news trustworthiness to a user base that has already widely spread fake news and Kremlin-linked propaganda intended to disrupt a US presidential election." (Source: Buzzfeed)
january 2018
Experts: Facebook’s media survey could actually work if it doesn’t get gamed
Carrie Brown, CUNY Graduate School of Journalism's director of social journalism, and David Carroll, a professor of media design at the New School, weigh in on Facebook's survey. They raise serious concerns about its methodology, but say the survey could be effective if it can limit the impact of trolls and if its results are "only one input in a complex system." Carroll also says that, in the unlikely case that Facebook shares its results with journalists, the data could contain useful insights on how publications can improve trust with readers. (Source: The Outline)
january 2018
A Temporary Contact: A mobile documentary
An interactive documentary told through mobile messages. The audience follows a passenger on her 15-hour bus journey to visit her brother in prison. (Source: A Temporary Contact via Alessandra Bergamin)
january 2018
Three tips for shooting more cinematic drone footage
(1) Master the "reveal" through panning and tilting, tracking your subject, getting a bird's eye view, and flying backward; (2) smooth your shots in production or post-production; and (3) map out your location before shooting. (Source: No Film School)
january 2018
FAA mobile app tells you if it's okay to fly your drone
"B4UFLY is an easy-to-use smartphone app that helps unmanned aircraft operators determine whether there are any restrictions or requirements in effect at the location where they want to fly."
(Source: FAA via PetaPixel)
january 2018
How Vox uses Facebook Groups to build community
Vox created two Facebook Groups: a private one for Affordable Care Act enrollees and a fan one around its Weeds podcast. "While the Obamacare group was focused on facilitating intimate and in-depth conversations around individuals’ experiences with the Affordable Care Act, the Weeds group is structured more as a way to follow the podcast, connect with fellow fans, and follow the news." (Source: Solution Set)
january 2018
Gestalt principles in UI design
Looks at how the visual perception principles of Gestalt theory apply to UI design. Principles include proximity, when items placed close together seem related; common region, when items in the same area seem related; similarity, when visually similar items seem related; closure, when our brains fill in incomplete shapes; symmetry, when symmetrical items seem to belong together; continuation, when items arranged in a line or a soft curve seem more related; and common fate, when items moving towards the same direction seem more related. (Source: Muzli via Sidebar.io)
january 2018
Radio Right Left
Multimedia audio project that asks audiences to record and share their thoughts and feelings about the future of America. (Source: Radio Right Left via MIT OpenDocLab)
january 2018
How the public fueled ProPublica's investigations in 2017
From sifting through public records to sharing their own stories, ProPublica's audience helped them report several investigative pieces in 2017. (Source: Pro Publica)
january 2018
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