asterisk2a + trope + sex-sells   2

It's Time To Stop Apologizing For Tina Fey - BuzzFeed News
[ more entertainment, don't make people think, don't try to make them think ... in cinema people uhhhmmmming ] But good books do not always make good movies — especially since the transformation from book to screen, at least in Hollywood’s hands, generally subtracts instead of adds nuance. [...] The most successful films are documentaries, which don’t face the inherent problem of casting actors, and white actors in particular, to play “bad guys” of different races, and high farces: films like Dr. Strangelove, M*A*S*H, and In the Loop that expand and eviscerate the inherent, if hidden, ridiculousness of modern war. [...] [ film has only ] cheap tricks, not the lacerating humor of effective farce. [...] women’s place in society, and sexual desirability as an alternately empowering and infantilizing experience. [...] The film dodges that idea, however, in favor of pitting Robbie’s character — who was created specifically for the purposes of the film — as Fey’s “competition.”
Hollywood  documentary  Television  book  Afghanistan  Iraq  War  War  on  Terror  Middle  East  Trope  history  public  awareness  storytelling  Sexual  objectification  objectification  Tina  Fey  sex-sells 
march 2016 by asterisk2a
Jenny Beavan’s Oscars outfit struck a blow for all women | Laura Bates | Opinion | The Guardian
This was not the first stand taken against the reduction of women in the industry to their clothes and jewellery. The past few years have seen Elisabeth Moss give the middle finger to the “mani-cam” at the Golden Globes, Cate Blanchett demand: “Do you do that to the guys?” as a camera panned up and down her body on the red carpet, and a series of women from Reese Witherspoon to Amy Poehler demand that reporters ask them more than questions about their frocks. We’ve also seen the actress and singer Zendaya speak out about racist responses to her dreadlocks at the Oscars, and Bridesmaids star Melissa McCarthy design her own dresses after designers refused to dress her, proving that Hollywood’s incredibly narrow definition of beauty is discriminatory on the basis of size and race. [...] find themselves pitted against each other in excruciating “best dressed” and “worst dressed” lists, the awards season will continue to provide a high-profile, glossy microcosm of wider prejudice.
feminism  feminist  Hollywood  Sexual  objectification  objectification  gender-based  discrimination  Television  beauty  sickness  Entertainment  Industry  Music  Industry  sex-sells  prejudice  snap  judgement  judgement  gossip  culture  gossip  Tabloid  Glossy  Magazine  business  model  pageviews  gender  politics  gender  policing  gender  pay  gap  gender  norms  gender  non-conforming  Trope  Oscars  post-racial  America  Fashion  Industry 
march 2016 by asterisk2a

Copy this bookmark:



description:


tags: