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Why Everyone Must Get Ready For The 4th Industrial Revolution
For example, as automation increases, computers and machines will replace workers across a vast spectrum of industries, from drivers to accountants and estate agents to insurance agents. By one estimate, as many as 47 percent of U.S. jobs are at risk from automation. Many experts suggest that the fourth industrial revolution will benefit the rich much more than the poor, especially as low-skill, low-wage jobs disappear in favor of automation.

But this isn’t new. Historically, industrial revolutions have always begun with greater inequality followed by periods of political and institutional change. The industrial revolution that began at the beginning of the 19th century originally led to a huge polarization of wealth and power, before being followed by nearly 100 years of change including the spread of democracy, trade unions, progressive taxation and the development of social safety nets.
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april 2016 by asterisk2a
It’s George Osborne who will shape Tory prospects for 2020 | Gaby Hinsliff | Comment is free | The Guardian
Power is leeching from David Cameron, and the colder, more ruthless chancellor is in the spotlight [...] Osborne’s big problem, of course, is that his fingerprints are all over everything the government has done – or not done – to tackle these problems over the last five years, let alone over the next five. And that’s not the only factor limiting his prospects of promotion He’s almost as exposed as Cameron is to fallout from the EU referendum gamble. (Heads we quit the EU, and government heads will have to roll; tails we stay, triggering Tory civil war).
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october 2015 by asterisk2a
Vince Cable: ‘Historically, the coalition will be seen as a success’ – interview | Politics | The Guardian
[A] look at the post-crash global economy, is the first fruit of that freedom. After toeing the line for five years, he can go public with his criticisms of chancellor George Osborne’s handling of the economy. He warns that the emphasis on consumption rather than investment, the continuing reliance on house price inflation as the driver of growth, the decline in productivity and innovation mean fundamental problems are not being addressed. He is also the first minister to lift the lid on the coalition: we learn the Tories could be likable colleagues but “collectively appalling, with ugly tribal prejudices”; that Osborne and David Cameron were unable “to move Theresa May an inch”; that Osborne’s Treasury effectively controlled government, with a hands-off Cameron; and that, in Cable’s view, Nick Clegg and Danny Alexander were too accepting of the Treasury line. [...] [ Cameron the PR man, being in office for the sake of just being in Office ] &! bit.ly/1KROBLk
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september 2015 by asterisk2a

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