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UK government asks: How's our hacking?
UK gov releases equipment interference guidelines for spy & law enforcement agencies; the guidelines never calls it hacking but 'interference activities; Deputy Director @ Privacy International Eric King (@e3i5) says it's the UK gov's attempt to grant itself some of the most intrusive powers. // "This is the first time that the agencies have admitted that they are in the hacking business," Eric King, the deputy director of London-based digital rights watchdog Privacy International, told Mashable. King said that it amounts to a belated attempt to give these activities a scrap of legal basis, in the face of a lawsuit filed by his group last year, which challenged the legality of the UK intelligence service GCHQ's hacking activities, revealed by Edward Snowden documents. For King, the document is basically an attempt by the UK government to grant itself "some of the most invasive and intrusive" powers it has at its disposal.
UK  GCHQ  David  Cameron  surveillance  state  Orwellian  cyber  espionage  corporate  espionage  espionage  Intelligence  Agency  Foreign  Intelligence  presidency  barackobama  NSA  CIA  FBI  relations  policy  affairs  Politics  Political  Governance  corporate  ethical  machine  Europe  Five  Eyes  Career  Politicians  abuse  of  power  transparency  accountability  trust  trustagent  confidence  democracy  unintended  consequences  Internet  Privacy  Privacy  human  rights  War  on  Terror  War  on  Drugs  organised  crime  encryption  backdoor  backdoors  wiretapping  interdiction 
february 2015 by asterisk2a
Here’s how reporters are reacting to Snowden’s revelations | PandoDaily
The global surveillance programs revealed by Edward Snowden have caused journalists to change how they operate, question what the government knows about them, and consider abandoning investigative reporting, according to a survey from the Pew Research Center. A significant number of the journalists surveyed said they had changed their behavior, whether it’s how they store sensitive files (49 percent), how they communicate with other journalists (29 percent), whether they’ve reached out to a source (13 percent), or pursued a specific story (2 percent). Many are also convinced the government is gathering information about them. Some 64 percent of journalists believed intelligence agencies had “probably collected data” about them. (The other 36 percent, as “InfoSec Taylor Swift” joked, must not read the news.)
investigative  journalism  journalism  journalismus  presidency  barackobama  surveillance  state  Orwellian  encryption  Internet  Privacy  Privacy  Whistleblower  NSA  CIA  FBI  GCHQ  BND  Five  Eyes  Wikileaks  Intelligence  Agency  foreign  relations  foreign  policy  foreign  affairs  Career  Politicians  Politics  David  Cameron  UK  USA  Europe  Espionage  Act  corporate  cyber  FISA  Court  FISAAA  Secret  Courts  leverage  Power  Play  Political  Governance  oversight  accountability  trust  trustagent  confidence  democracy  transparency  No  Representation  short-term  view  short-term  thinking  unintended  consequences  Lügenpresse  Pressefreiheit  freedom  of  press  wiretapping  folly  science  error  distrust  fairness  Law  &  Justice  Justice  System  complexity 
february 2015 by asterisk2a

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