asterisk2a + disinflation   12

Why did Japan stop growing? Professor Takeo Hoshi at ANU - YouTube
Blyth argued its culture/society & structural. TPP trade deal might help productivity growth & opening Japan further 2 global trade. & encourage immigration reform. Regulatory reform; stop protection of zombies (gov guarantees, contracts, subsidies), corporate governance. Oversight. Transparency. Also Start-up rate (bottom-up disruption) needs reform (reduce red tape, create start-up/business hubs) // &! What is Abenomics? - youtu.be/_UafzhHzmwE //&! Noriko Hama & Yukio Noguchi "Abenomics and What comes After" - youtu.be/a29FTJXYev0 'unable to share affluence' - income redistribution << marginal propensity to consume, 16% left out of society (poverty), lack of empathy & compassion. BOJ is single lender 2 gov. Career Politicians! Companies have no need 2 borrow/cant force banks 2 lend. //&! min52 Problem of rising long-term interest rates solved w BOJ debt monetisation = inflation (probable near future scenario). &! youtu.be/ArnLHTE0e1g &! youtu.be/wYtJ7Fyn9NA &! youtu.be/AbKeTeb-I_M
Japan  economic  history  lost  decade  lost  generation  ageing  population  demographic  bubble  culture  society  fiscal  stimulus  zombie  banks  zombie  corporations  banking  crisis  Exportweltmeister  Germany  subsidies  subsidizing  distortion  asset  bubble  Abenomics  monetary  policy  monetary  stimulus  fiscal  policy  white  elephants  Richard  Koo  productivity  corporate  culture  corporate  governance  deflationary  deflation  crowding  out  Debt  Super  Cycle  BOJ  Yen  public  investment  productive  investment  stagnation  secular  stagnation  currency-war  currency  debasement  currency  war  ZIRP  QE  NIRP  liquidity  trap  monetary  transmission  mechanism  disinflation  inflation  expectation  inflation  targeting  Makers  Career  Politicians  savings  rate  savings  glut  policy  error  marginal  propensity  to  consume  poverty  trap  squeezed  middle  class  Sozialer  Abstieg  working  poor  precarious  work  inequality  Gini  coefficient  industrial  policy  wage  stagnation  wage  growth  income  growth  disposable  income  income  distribution  low  income  neoliberalism  neoliberal  part-time  Zero  Hour  Contract  Contractor  underemployed  microeconomic  policy  macroeconomic  policy  JGB  bond  bubble  monetisation  monetization  structural  imbalance  faultlines  Impediments  excess  reserves 
september 2015 by asterisk2a
Global economy woes spark share falls - BBC News
Fed released minutes from its meeting on 28-29 July, showing that one policymaker was ready to vote for an interest rate rise at the meeting. Overall, the Fed thought conditions for a US rate rise "were approaching", but the economy was not ready yet. Other policymakers remained concerned that inflation would remain weak because of the strong dollar and falling commodity prices, which act as a double depressant on imports. The Fed's key interest rate has been kept near zero since December 2008. There has been speculation that the Fed will raise rates at its meeting in September, and last month Fed chair Janet Yellen said she thought a rate rise this year was likely. Following the release of the Fed's minutes, US stocks rallied briefly but then fell back, while the dollar weakened on the currency markets. The Dow Jones index ended Wednesday trading down 0.9%. [...] The committee also cited China as a potential problem, [...] [econ growth has 2 be sufficiently strong, incl labour mrkt]
China  Yuan  RMB  inflation  expectation  inflation  targeting  disinflation  inflation  wage  inflation  dis-inflation  deflationary  deflation  Fed  PBOC  currency  debasement  devaluation  currency  war  currency-war  Dollar  Japan  Yen  BOJ  Abenomics  economic  history  Taper  2015  recovery  labour  market  participation  rate  unemployment  structural  unemployment  long-term  unemployment  productivity  output  gap  distortion  ZIRP  NIRP  QE  secular  stagnation  UK  USA  Europe  BIS  Oil  price  OPEC  energy  price  New  Normal  FOMC  commodity  prices  global  trade  global  economy  headwinds 
august 2015 by asterisk2a
China's currency devaluation could spark 'tidal wave of deflation' | Business | The Guardian
[3rd day in a row Yuan/RMB is devalued by PBOC (13/08/15)] “We’re all going to feel it: we’ll feel it through commodities; we’ll feel it through manufactured goods exports, not just from China but from everywhere that has to compete with it; and we’ll feel it through wages.” [...] China could be willing to let the yuan depreciate by as much as 25% over the next five years – “stone by stone, step by step” – in an attempt to restore the export-led growth that was such a winning formula [...] China [may be] trying to protect itself against the period of financial instability [following Taper by western central banks Fed/BOE] [or counter $ recent rise 21% & peg against $] [or fight home grown recession with kitchen sink] // &! bloom.bg/1gC8FFe &! bloom.bg/1WkMfZZ &! bloom.bg/1hy7O9l &! bloom.bg/1NpE4FI &! bv.ms/1IKB3fX // what is the new normal 4 growth in this global economy, competitive = keeping prices low = inflation & low interest rate pressure.
yuan  RMB  PBOC  China  devaluation  deflationary  deflation  UK  USA  Europe  Exportweltmeister  competition  competitive  competitiveness  Lohnzurückhaltung  lohndumping  secular  stagnation  western  world  globalisation  globalization  commodities  commodity  business  commoditization  Germany  Asia  Latin  America  borderless  flat  world  wage  growth  wage  stagnation  inflation  expectation  inflation  targeting  wage  pressure  productivity  output  gap  recovery  GFC  economic  history  New  Normal  hunt  for  yield  Great  Moderation  fiscal  policy  monetary  policy  QE  ZIRP  NIRP  Taper  unintended  consequences  unknown  unkown  complexity  Industrial  Revolution  2.0  IMF  SDR  currency  war  disinflation  inflation  wage  inflation  Japan  Australia  Oil  price  energy  price  Developing  Frontier  Markets  Forex  USD  British  Pound  Euro  Yen  BOJ  BOE  Fed  ECB  Bank  of  Canada  asset  bubble  macroprudential  policy  asset  allocation  productive  investment  underinvestment  business  investment  2015 
august 2015 by asterisk2a
China devalues yuan currency to three-year low - BBC News
bbc.in/1WfUOFp // The weakening of the currency will also put the US Fed on the spot. In effect China is exporting deflation to the US - and so some will argue that the Fed should find an elegant way to back away from its recent signalling that September will see the first rise in interest rates since the Crash of 2008. Or to put it another way, in terms of US manufacturers and exporters, Beijing has done the monetary tightening that arguably the US economy needs. // &! tcrn.ch/1Tnj89s Apple shares reaction -5%, higher import costs. // &! bbc.in/1TrsssP - rattles the markets. // &! bit.ly/1JdPM8F - Der starke Verlust des Yuan deutete darauf hin, dass China einen Währungskrieg mit dem Westen provoziert. Doch tatsächlich spiegelt der niedrige Kurs die Schwäche der chinesischen Wirtschaft. // &! 3rd day, 3 devaluation move - bit.ly/1Ns1kmu &! Western central banks advised to resist [taper] & 2 prepare 2 ward off deflationary slump in face of cheaper Chinese exports - bit.ly/1DLIEy3
China  economic  growth  2015  yuan  currency  war  devaluation  PBOC  Taper  USA  UK  deflationary  deflation  RMB  Japan  Europe  Germany  disinflation  inflation  expectation  dis-inflation  inflation  inflation  targeting  western  world  BOE  Fed  ECB  BOJ  Brazil  Australia  commodities  IMF  SDR  Forex  Yen  USD  Euro  British  Pound  recovery  faultlines  global  trade  global  economy  globalisation  globalization  global  imbalances  savings  glut  hunt  for  yield  asset  bubble  asset  allocation  ZIRP  NIRP  QE  distortion  unintended  consequences  unknown  unkown  monetary  policy  Oil  price  energy  price 
august 2015 by asterisk2a
STEPHANIE FLANDERS: It's borrowing and debt driving Britain's recovery | This is Money
New forecasts that went with his speech paint a different picture, of a recovery driven in large part by households borrowing more, and saving less. The level of household debt, relative to income, has been falling since the crisis, as families have cut back and worked to pay off debt. But the new Budget forecasts show it starting to rise again, from the final quarter of this year, moving from 142 per cent of income back up to 166 per cent by 2019. That’s more or less where household debt had got to in the lead up to the financial crisis, after all that irresponsible ‘debt fuelled growth’ under Gordon Brown. [...]And total level of investment is now more than 20 per cent below where it was at the start of 2008. // &! bit.ly/1IxXKax - low inflation, no inflation pressures expected till 2016 // &! bit.ly/1DepsJ2 - The UK has the most unbalanced economy of any OECD country.
2015  recovery  UK  austerity  fiscal  policy  monetary  policy  ZIRP  NIRP  QE  debt-fuelled  recovery  debt  monetisation  debt  monetization  economic  growth  economic  multiplier  productive  investment  asset  allocation  distortion  speculative  bubbles  hunt  for  yield  current  account  deficit  savings  rate  debt  servitude  household  debt  mortgage  market  Taper  credit  card  consumer  debt  debtoverhang  sovereign  debt  crisis  Super  Cycle  public  debt  private  debt  debt  bubble  NPL  Makers  Manufacturing  STEM  George  Osborne  short-term  thinking  short-term  view  David  Cameron  Career  Politicians  No  Representation  fiscal  stimulus  IMF  OECD  Toff  Privileged  Establishment  social  mobility  downward  mobility  Gini  coefficient  fairness  policy  error  policy  folly  interest  groups  democracy  social  tension  social  cohesion  budget2015  general  election  2015  election  campaign  promises  competitiveness  competitive  flat  world  borderless  global  trade  structural  imbalance  Impediments  secular  stagnation  Richard  Koo  deflationary  deflation  inflation  expectation  inflation  targeting  disinflation  inflation  Mark  Carney  BOE  balance  sheet  recession  deleveraging  economic  history  faultlines  global  imbalances  industrial  policy  output  gap  productivity 
july 2015 by asterisk2a
Royal Dutch Shell cuts 6,500 jobs - BBC News
Oil giant Royal Dutch Shell has announced it has shed 6,500 jobs as part of cost-cutting plans as it seeks to counter falling oil prices. // &! bbc.in/1OPYI2I - British Gas owner Centrica cuts 6,000 jobs [...] However, the strong performance at British Gas was offset by a collapse in profits at Centrica's oil and gas production division. Profits in this unit fell 78% to £116m as a result of lower oil prices. [...] Centrica appointed Iain Conn as chief executive at the start of this year. He has been conducting a strategic review of the business over the past five months, which has concluded Centrica should concentrate on the British Gas side of the business and reduce its activities in actual energy production, which takes major investment. That is a less attractive business currently, as raw energy costs, such as oil, are around $50-60 a barrel, half the levels of last year. Centrica said it was assuming the oil price would not move far from that for the foreseeable future.
energy  price  2015  Oil  price  recovery  global  economy  China  secular  stagnation  economic  growth  business  cycle  business  confidence  consumer  confidence  deflationary  deflation  disinflation  debtoverhang  sovereign  debt  crisis  Taper  balance  sheet  recession  Richard  Koo  energy  market  renewable  energy  green  energy  energy  security  wind  energy  energy  policy  energy  efficiency  competitive  competitiveness  OPEC  shale  gas  fracking  shalegas  UK  USA  Europe  Japan  debt-fuelled  recovery  debt  monetisation  debt  monetization  fiscal  policy  monetary  policy  austerity  ZIRP  NIRP  QE  productive  investment  asset  allocation  unintended  consequences  unknown  unkown  asset  bubble  speculative  bubbles  hunt  for  yield 
july 2015 by asterisk2a
David Stockman: Central Banks Setting Up World for Bad Time - YouTube
"monetary madness" - repeat phrase of we aim for 2% inflation, that is why we do it. // BIS warned recently in its yearly paper - that Central Banks are unable to combat any global crisis flare-up that is more likely to be worse than GFC ... could be China of all things. // 2000 bust was fought with fed easing and throwing money at it, and GFC too. Next crisis - throwing money at it and easing will not be possible. // &! Deflation Comes First, Then Inflation - Mike Maloney - youtu.be/vAFtlgJNMCo // &! "One Bet, that is Big Enough, (that maybe was even conventional wisdom that it is save and THE BET) when wrong, does put you in a deep deep hole - youtu.be/tp9UjhZz-eo --- Nassim Taleb. There are lots of candidates/things that could blow up in peoples faces. &! Nouriel Roubini: Deflation Needs Monetary, Fiscal Policy - youtu.be/IADncoxQRYg
BIS  deflationary  deflation  financial  repression  BOE  Fed  ECB  BOJ  ZIRP  NIRP  QE  Abenomics  monetary  policy  unconventional  monetary  policy  monetary  system  monetary  stimulus  monetary  theory  modern  monetary  theory  debt  monetisation  debt  monetization  inflation  expectation  inflation  currency  war  unknown  unkown  unintended  consequences  GFC  recovery  secular  stagnation  austerity  fiscal  policy  fiscal  stimulus  economic  history  IMF  currency  debasement  inflation  targeting  disinflation  hyperinflation  dis-inflation  deleveraging  leverage  balance  sheet  recession  debtoverhang  dot.com  debt  bubble  Super  Cycle  fiat  money  trust  trustagent  Nassim  Taleb  Black  Swan  Greece 
july 2015 by asterisk2a
Who Will Be Hurt Most When The Tech Bubble Bursts? Not VCs | TechCrunch
In a nutshell, FOMO is driving many investors in a hustle to be a part of the next Facebook or Twitter and put in huge investments for a fraction of stake. And, they don’t see much risk in it as long as they get the downside protection. [ growth round = rocket fuel splashed onto stuff to acquire more customers and market share (basically, but not always) ] [...] Someday, pretty soon, these will be put to the test, and valuations based on visibility of earnings will matter again. A few will succeed of course, but several others will fall – it remains to be seen how miserably. VCs will most likely walk away with their invested money, if not more. It’s the employees and founders who will see their million-dollar dreams crash and burn. [living beyond ur means & betting dollars you dont have on a time that seems further away than u can even guess (secular stagnation)] [lack of income growth (across the western world) thus disposable income (discretionary spending) is also not helping]
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may 2015 by asterisk2a
What Explains the Persistent Lack of Inflation? - YouTube
world is flattening, technology impact, low hanging fruits picked, lack of income growth (lack of disposable income, discretionary spending - squeezed middle class), inequality (Super Rich, 1% and corporations not paying fair share of tax), austerity, austerity (underinvestment, no productive investment for long-term growth), business (underinvestment and no productive investment), low to negative savings rate!, a demographic bubble,
secular  stagnation  western  world  disinflation  deflationary  2015  economic  history  economic  model  economics  of  abundance  marginal  cost  Lohnzurückhaltung  Niedriglohnsektor  income  growth  squeezed  middle  class  QE  ZIRP  NIRP  fiscal  policy  austerity  monetary  policy  liquidity  trap  Abenomics  demographic  bubble  complexity  unintended  consequences  unknown  unkown  deleveraging  balance  sheet  recession  western  society  productivity  UK  USA  Europe  Japan  OECD  output  gap  participation  rate  labour  market  labour  economics  Fed  BOE  ECB  BOJ  IMF  recovery  GFC  tax  evasion  tax  avoidance  Wall  Street  profit  maximisation  shareholder  value  Super  Rich  1%  crony  capitalism  bailout  inequality  income  inequality  Gini  coefficient  trickle-down  economics  economic  damage  macroeconomics  economic  growth  microeconomics  neoliberal  neoliberalism  Schuldenbremse  Pact  PIGS  zombie  banks  zombie  corporations  zombie  consumer 
may 2015 by asterisk2a
The euro crisis: No picnic for anyone | The Economist
Core inflation in Germany was even lower, at around 1%, and why was that? Well, the capital flows from the core to the periphery meant that there was less investment in Germany. Germany’s economy opted to devalue internally, which Mr Mallaby correctly describes as “excruciating”—albeit only for today’s periphery, not for Germany in the first decade of the euro.

The more plausible diagnosis is that the “sick man of Europe”, Germany, suffered from the euro for a decade while the periphery was booming, and now the periphery is suffering (heavily) while Germany is doing relatively well (though it, too, looks increasingly weak). Or in short: a suboptimal currency union is a very bad idea, especially with a below-2%-inflation target that forces adjusting countries into severe disinflation if not deflation. And worst of all, the central bank is not even expected to reach its 2% target over the next five years.
germany  disinflation  deflation  Europe  ECB  monetary  fiscal  policy  history  economic  economy 
november 2011 by asterisk2a

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