asterisk2a + bpa + pesticide   4

Chemicals in packaging, carpets and non-stick pans 'may contribute to obesity' | Science | The Guardian
Chemicals used to make non-stick pots and pans, stain-resistant carpets, and food packaging may contribute to high levels of obesity by disrupting the body’s ability to burn calories, scientists say.

Researchers at Harvard University examined the effects of compounds called perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs), which have already raised concerns among some health experts after animal experiments and other studies linked them to cancer, high cholesterol and immune problems.
public  health  pollution  obesogenic  environment  obesity  overweight  Cancer  PFAS  BPA  bisphenol  plastic  autoimmune  disease  chronic  lowgrade  inflammation  immune  system  crisis  fungicide  herbicide  pesticide  ecological  environmental  Klimakatastrophe 
february 2018 by asterisk2a
How I discovered a coffee pot was making my patient sick - Quartz
In January, a study published in PLOS linked environmental chemical exposure with early menopause. This study suggests a connection between the ubiquitous chemicals we’re exposed to and our health. Other studies support this concept, such as a 2014 research study showing BPA in the liners of canned beverages increases blood pressure. Health care providers generally are not taught to consider common household items as a potential cause of disease, but perhaps we should be. BPA is a known endocrine disruptor. Research evidence links BPA exposure with early puberty, infertility, breast cancer, and abnormal periods. It has also been tied to obesity, prostate cancer, and neurodevelopmental problems in children. The National Health and Nutrition Survey (NHANES) found that obese adults are likely to have higher levels of BPA in their urine. [...] And lest you think “BPA-free” is the answer, the substitute plastics which contain bisphenol S or other resins appear to be equally hazardous.
BPA  bisphenola  Bisphenol  A  plastic  nation  pesticide  herbicide  fungicide  ecological  disaster  environmental  disaster  Great  Pacific  Garbage  Patch 
april 2015 by asterisk2a
Tyrone Hayes + Penelope Jagessar Chaffer: The toxic baby? - YouTube
Filmmaker Penelope Jagessar Chaffer was curious about the chemicals she was exposed to while pregnant: Could they affect her unborn child? So she asked scientist Tyrone Hayes to brief her on one he studied closely: atrazine, a herbicide used on corn. (Hayes, an expert on amphibians, is a critic of atrazine, which displays a disturbing effect on frog development.) Onstage together at TEDWomen, Hayes and Chaffer tell their story.
health  crisis  environment  children  unintended  consequences  evolution  chemicals  human  health  toxic  contamination  toxic  pesticide  bisphenolA  toxic  chemical  Letrozole  Atrazine  BPA 
february 2012 by asterisk2a

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