asterisk2a + sony   7

Samsung’s Latest Galaxy Note 5 Could Be the End of the High-Priced Phablet | Re/code
“The data is showing that unless there is a brand pull (and only Apple is in this category), the device game has become a price game,” said wireless industry consultant Chetan Sharma. “This is especially true on the high end. Given that some good devices are available at half the price makes it hard for Samsung, LG, Sony and similar players to be successful with a device on the high end.” One need only look at recent financials from Samsung, HTC and Sony to see the impact that this is already having on both sales and profits. There is another big trend hurting Samsung and others trying to sell premium devices. Until very recently, consumers have been able to snap up even the priciest phones for as little as $200 with a two-year contract. But in a trend started by T-Mobile and increasingly true across the U.S. wireless industry, carriers are no longer subsidizing these devices.
HTC  Samsung  Android  Lenovo  Motorola  Sony  LG  Wireless  Carrier  Xiaomi  commodity  business  commoditization  differentiate  differentiation  category 
august 2015 by asterisk2a
Employee Data Breach The Worst Part Of Sony Hack | TechCrunch
Hackers found a file with Sony usernames and passwords called “Usernames&Passwords.” Sony Director of Information Security Jason Spaltro even gave an interview in 2007 whose whole point was to revel in Sony’s security loopholes: “it’s a valid business decision to accept the risk” of a security breach. “I will not invest $10 million to avoid a possible $1 million loss,” he said at the time. This hack is estimated to cost Sony $100 million after all is said and done. The last one cost the company a cool $171 million. &! &! http://techcrunch.com/2014/12/15/why-its-right-to-report-on-the-sony-hack/
Sony  hack  black  hat  hacker  leak  Big  Data  Privacy  Internet  Privacy  cyber  security  security  online  security  password  security  Hacking 
january 2015 by asterisk2a
The ethics of hacked email and otherwise ill-gotten information | Poynter.
[HIPPA, stupid?] Bloomberg’s piece on Sony’s knowledge of its employees’ medical records is perhaps the best example of reporting in the public interest that’s come out of the recent hack. It’s a story that starts with the emails, but delves into a corporate practice that has moral, legal and public policy implications for everyone. As a journalist, your ethical obligations remain the same whether information is delivered directly to you by a confidential informant, or simply posted to a public website. Your first priority is accuracy. Can you verify that the information itself is true? Or are you just repeating it? On top of that, how can you supplement accuracy with both precision and context to add value to the information? &! http://www.theverge.com/2014/12/16/7402377/sony-pictures-is-being-sued-for-failing-to-protect-employee-data
journalism  journalismus  investigative  journalism  Whistleblower  cyber  crime  Sony  ethical  machine  corporate  governance 
december 2014 by asterisk2a
As Samsung Falters, An Opening For Startups | TechCrunch
[Samsung] is so identified with the government and the progress of Korea that the country is occasionally referred to locally as the Republic of Samsung. So when Samsung repeatedly presented bad news to investors this past year, particularly its results last quarter that showed a drop of 15% of its operating profit — the first drop in three years — there has been something of a slowly boiling panic underway in the country. From talks with people who work at the company, stress levels are off the charts, intensified by the pressure to return previously-paid performance bonuses. My colleague John Biggs has already talked about Samsung’s race to the bottom, but that was before these most recent results. With consumers unwilling to pay top dollar for Samsung’s best smartphones and Chinese manufacturers readying a dizzying array of competitive and inexpensive products, Samsung faces what might be considered an almost overpowering inevitability crisis about its downfall.
Samsung  South  Korea  China  BRIC  flat  world  globalization  globalisation  Nokia  Motorola  competitive  advantage  competitiveness  competitive  Competition  comparative  advantage  multi-product  company  conglomerate  differentiation  differentiate  Japan  technological  progress  Apple  aspirational  product  Product/Market  Fit  change  Mobile  Creative  Mobile  Creatives  economic  history  Sony  destruction  Moore's  Law  commoditization  commodity  business  margin  creativity  disrupting  markets  disruption  economics  Developing  Frontier  KakaoTalk  Daum  Venture  Capital  Seoul  Start-Up  Scene  culture  society 
august 2014 by asterisk2a

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