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Google Search Could Ditch All Photo Thumbnails Under EU Copyright Law
Google Search Could Ditch All Photo Thumbnails Under EU Copyright Law
Michael Zhang. Petapixel. January 18, 2019
copyright 
11 hours ago
Hallucinations and $100,000: the poker player who shut himself in a pitch-black room for weeks | Sport | The Guardian
Hallucinations and $100,000: the poker player who shut himself in a pitch-black room for weeks
Rich Alati had a six-figure sum in his sights. As long as he could survive 30 days in the dark with no human contact

Kristen Doerer. The Guardian. 10 January 2019
solitude 
9 days ago
Fearless Ryuichi Sakamoto won’t stay silent on Okinawa base:The Asahi Shimbun
Fearless Ryuichi Sakamoto won’t stay silent on Okinawa base
The Asahi Shimbun
January 9, 2019
(This article is based on an interview by Hiroki Ito)
. . . . .

In the course of visiting areas hit by the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake, tsunami and the Fukushima nuclear disaster, I came to think that nuclear power plants and U.S. military bases are not separate issues. If nuclear power plants and military bases are needed so much, why not build them in Tokyo?

Still, the state forces them upon rural areas. I think there is an underlining mind-set of “Put what smells bad far away.”
japan  Sakamoto.Ryuichi  okinawa 
10 days ago
An Introduction to Roger Caillois' Stones & Other Texts (Pierres, 1966)sensatejournal.com
An Introduction to Caillois’ Stones & Other Texts
Donna Roberts
[6] Flint Magazine Issue 1+2

http://sensatejournal.com/issues/flint-magazine/



Caillois’ network of engagement during this decade was hugely influential in developing the idiosyncrasy of his method and the thematic focus of his studies. While his avant-garde apprenticeship with Breton and Bataille nurtured his prodigious intellectual boldness (he was only 21 years old when Breton hailed him “the mental compass of surrealism”), through his academic training Caillois developed a keen sense for underlying and inter-connecting structures, whether related to society, myth, games, poetry, the imagination, or the affective character of the natural world. If one reads closely enough, Caillois’ Stones draws together the threads of many such concerns. While the above-mentioned figures influenced the structural and methodological facets of Caillois’ writing, then two other formative twentieth-century figures influenced his style and development as a writer. First, the philosopher of science and the imagination, Gaston Bachelard, who Caillois met in 1934, and whose thoughts about the phenomenology of imagination greatly influenced his writings on stones and his generalizing approach to the poetic relationship between mind and nature. Second, the Argentine writer Jorge Luis Borges, who Caillois met while living in Buenos Aires between 1939 and 1945, and of whose work he became the first French translator. Indeed, Caillois’ books might even appear like some of those that inhabit the curious libraries or old houses found in the uncanny fictional labyrinths of the Borgesian universe.
Roger.Caillois  Gaston.Bachelard 
10 days ago
My lack of DIY skills is an embarrassment to lesbians everywhere | Arwa Mahdawi | Opinion | The Guardian
My lack of DIY skills is an embarrassment to lesbians everywhere
It goes against the stereotype, but I, like every lesbian I know, am useless with a drill. This is the year I’m going to fix that

Arwa Mahdawi. The Guardian. 6 January 2019

. . . . .

Lesbians, it’s fair to say, have a reputation for being good with their hands. Girls who like girls love DIY, according to the stereotypes. There’s nothing we enjoy more than pulling on a flannel shirt and sensible shoes and revving up our power tools.

These stereotypes seem to have some basis in reality. A YouGov survey from a few years ago found that American lesbians are uber-confident about their DIY abilities. For example, 77% of lesbians said they could build flat-pack furniture, compared with 58% of heterosexual men and 48% of straight women. And 87% of gay women said they were good at unblocking drains, compared with 78% of straight men. Please get your mind out of the gutter: these are serious statistics.…
DIY  hardware  gender  hardware.lit  humor 
13 days ago
What Driving Can Teach Us About Living
What Driving Can Teach Us About Living
How we respond to the rules of the road offers insight into being human.

Rachel Cusk. NYTimes Magazine. 3 January 2019
rachel.cusk  motoring 
13 days ago
Returning to Reims by Didier Eribon review – can you escape your upbringing? | Books | The Guardian
Returning to Reims by Didier Eribon review – can you escape your upbringing?
A virtuosic memoir of sexual awakening and of childhood within a French working class that now seems to have deserted the left

Steven Poole. The Guardian. 3 August 2018
Didier.Eribon 
15 days ago
Experience: I’m a colour-blind paint mixer | Life and style | The Guardian
Experience: I’m a colour-blind paint mixer
I had a row with my bosses over a cream pot of paint that they insisted was green. That’s when I realised
Ruksar Ajmal. The Guardian. 4 January 2018
color  paint  blind  blindness 
15 days ago
'I can do it in robes': Japanese monks post videos in protest at driving fine
'I can do it in robes': Japanese monks post videos in protest at driving fine
Videos showing monks skateboarding and skipping were posted after monk fined for driving while wearing robes

Justin McCurry. The Guardian. 4 January 2019
japan  Buddhism 
15 days ago
Don’t mess with Marie: tidying up with author and Netflix star Marie Kondo | Global | The Guardian
Interview
Don’t mess with Marie: tidying up with author and Netflix star Marie Kondo
Aaron Hicklin. The Guardian / The Observer. 30 December 2018
clutter  decluttering  Marie.Kondo  no  just.no 
20 days ago
The places we swim - a picture essay | Travel | The Guardian
They travelled across the country for a year to find Australia’s best swimming spots. In this book extract, the couple share some of their discoveries

by Caroline Clements and Dillon Seitchik-Reardon
The Guardian. 1 December 2018
swimming  oz 
20 days ago
He Helped Indonesia Through a ‘Year of Disasters,’ While Facing His Own - The New York Times
He Helped Indonesia Through a ‘Year of Disasters,’ While Facing His Own

photo caption :
Sutopo Purwo Nugroho, the spokesman for Indonesia’s disaster management agency, has Stage 4 lung cancer. He said he “accepted that it was my fate, just like people who were affected by earthquakes and the tsunami.”

Richard C. Paddock. NYTimes. December 28, 2018

. . . . .

For 16 years, he worked for government agencies as a researcher, mainly on water issues. After a dam broke near Jakarta in 2009, killing more than 100 people, he analyzed photos of the dam and went public with his finding that cracks in the structure had caused it to fail.

“It was me against the Ministry of Public Works,” he said. “At that time, I received a lot of threats to keep quiet.”

Even so, he was asked to take a leading role in analyzing and explaining subsequent disasters.

He turned down his current post three times, he said, because he did not want a job in which he thought his role would be to promote his boss.

He was finally left with no choice in 2010, when he was directed one day to attend a ceremony dressed in a suit. Only after he arrived did he discover he was being sworn in as the disaster agency’s spokesman.
indonesia 
21 days ago
Chilling discovery: ice house discovered under London street | Science | The Guardian
Chilling discovery: ice house discovered under London street
Cavernous 18th-century store reveals link to lost trade in ice blocks from Norwegian fjord

Esther Addley. The Guardian. 28 December 2018

. . . . .

For Sarapure, the store’s significance is a link to a once lucrative but now almost entirely forgotten trade. “At one point there were probably a couple of thousand ice wells in London, but most of them were probably quite small.

“What this one does and why it is significant is it bridges the gap between [the time when] ice was only for the very wealthy, to a kind of mass availability of ice, which you get from the 1830s and 40s. And this occupies that 50-year space. It’s ice for everyone, eventually.”
ice 
22 days ago
China's new live-streaming star wins legions of fans thanks to useless inventions
China's new live-streaming star wins legions of fans thanks to useless inventions
Geng Shuai makes a living from videos of absurd contraptions, including an alarm that goes off if your fly is open

Lily Kuo. The Guardian. 27 December 2018
china  humor 
23 days ago
Dirt-poor and ugly — the proud new mantra of those left behind in the new China - Los Angeles Times
Dirt-poor and ugly — the proud new mantra of those left behind in the new China
Alice Su.
Los Angeles Times. December 26, 2018

. . . . .

Chinese netizens created a composite character from the characters for "poor," "ugly," and "dirt" that went viral on the social media platform Weibo. The first image shows the composite character. The second image shows three definitions for it. (Weibo)
china  qiou  diaosi 
24 days ago
The big chill: the health benefits of swimming in ice water | Global | The Guardian
The big chill: the health benefits of swimming in ice water
Tim Lewis. The Guardian. 23 December 2018

. . . . .

Heminsley describes wild swimming as “a hangover in reverse”: pain for moments followed by a prolonged, wholesome buzz. It felt like time to experience that for myself so, on a recent Tuesday morning, I went to Highgate Men’s Pond on Hampstead Heath in London for a dip with Patrick McLennan, the co-director (with Samuel Smith) of a new documentary called The Ponds, about the iconic bathing spot. McLennan is in no doubt that there is a healing aspect to swimming outdoors, one that he finds is multiplied when the temperature drops to single digits.

“Most of the people who come to the ponds are suffering from or in recovery from trauma of some kind, whether it’s emotional, psychological or physical,” says McLennan. “There’s this old guy in the film and he talks about how swimming here is the one thing that makes him feel how he used to feel when he was young. And I think a lot of outdoor swimmers will recognise that.”
swimming 
27 days ago
'A rose with a thousand petals' … what makes an aphorism – and is this a golden age? | Books | The Guardian
'A rose with a thousand petals' … what makes an aphorism – and is this a golden age?
Sam Leith. The Guardian. 21 December 2018

. . . . .

among the comments, this, by PunCrock —

Living in the 70s in a northern city like ours, we fared pretty well with the blunt tools of pith and truism. Yet my father, who worked as a typesetter for a Chinese newspaper, kept a box of unusual aphorisms under the stairs which he told us, was only to be used in an emergency. When later he passed away and his house had to be cleared, I found the box and opened it.

Give a man a badger and he will eat for a day. Teach a badger to be a man and he will run rampage through your retirement community.
aphorisms 
29 days ago
Signage Up for Section of 134 Highway Renamed After President Barack Obama | KTLA
Signage Up for Section of 134 Highway Renamed After President Barack Obama
KTLA.
Nouran Salahieh. December 20, 2018
eagle.rock 
4 weeks ago
Evelyn Berezin, 93, Dies; Built the First True Word Processor
Robert D. McFadden. NYTimes. December 10, 2018

“Why is this woman not famous?” the British writer and entrepreneur Gwyn Headley asked in a 2010 blog post.
word.processing 
4 weeks ago
keynote at World Picture is by @anne_boyer
anne boyer Retweeted

Glyn Davis
‏@warholmooc

If you missed the keynote by @anne_boyer at this year’s World Picture, as I did, this amazing live-tweet thread by @ncecire provides a fabulous record of the material covered and arguments made

. . . . .

Natalia Cecire
‏@ncecire

[alas, who blocked asfaltics]

The final keynote at World Picture is by @anne_boyer, introduced by @aria_impura. Title slide is baskets of baby dolls in Naples.

I tried to take a picture but my phone gets zero reception in this lecture hall. >:(
10:11 AM - 13 Dec 2018

Recommending Sophie Lewis's Full Surrogacy Now, forthcoming from Verso, and Michelle O'Brien's history of family abolition activism, forthcoming from Endnotes. The talk is about the poetics of reproduction and repetition.

Repetition "at least appears to be that which links the various activities we call reproduction. It also happens to be a technique of poetry." John Donne: "Repetition is not so."

"Repetition" as the link between different valences of the term "reproduction." Pressures of capitalism in the face of climate change, rising fascism. This talk is not to add a layer of abstraction but to find something we can use in this scenario.

Starting with The Undying: Pain, Vulnerability, Mortality, Medicine, Art, Time, Space, Dreams, Data, Exhaustion, Cancer, and Care. The experience of cancer as a single mother with distributed friends who "couldn't drive me to chemo." The "temporal bullying of capitalism."

In the US, you are legally entitled to 8 weeks to deal with cancer. Cancer is not obedient to this requirement. Competing temporalities. So The Undying is not interested in "public bleeding"; instead, it attends to the repetitive labor of going through care.

Reading from The Undying: repetitive labor like doing the dishes produces quantities of dishes washed, minutes spent. Freedom feels like not doing the dishes. "Who in the current arrangement of the world does the dishes, and who does not?"

Bodies always in the process of being undone; doing the dishes is "trying to block ruin's path." Making the world vs keeping the world ok. // "When I wrote that I was unable to think outside the constraints of the imposed temporality of repetition."

Can repetition illuminate reproduction? Maybe reproduction doesn't have to feel like doing the dishes. "Reproduction" euphemized as "making babies," creepily equates humans and things.

A friend argues that "reproduction" is the WRONG word for analyzing "social reproduction" if we know that the family and the couple are not natural forms. The act of "biological reproduction" is actually productive, at least in part, and doesn't guarantee social reproduction.

When we produce another human we don't reproduce ourselves; we produce concepts like "baby" and "child" and "baby" and we reproduce social relations. And a new human. Relations are disguised as unchanging, repetitive, and inescapable.

"You're not born a baby; you're called that."

This is an attempt to refuse to see life in the deadening terms of capitalism, to not believe the lie that this is everything. Reproduction is only partially what we call what reproduction does.

Cf Nina Power's call to think about reproduction carefully and non-nihilistically, e.g. /Brief Notes towards a Non-Nihilistic Theory of Non-Reproduction/. Reproduction is not a "mere function" but a "collective process."

[Still Power:] The real enemy is not "humanity 'as such'...but in the ruling class."

"Reproduction" is a term that comes to be applied to biological reproduction with the emergence of ideas of species and race. Birthing new life is rewritten as reproducing the species/race, replicating a population.

Marx and Engels likewise see social reproduction as a way of copying what came before. Birth and care, repetitive acts that take the form of crushing sameness, the repetition of social forms that reproduce workers for capitalism. Thus revolution is in the street, not the home.

Falling in love, having a child having a miscarriage: are we really to see these as imitative, repetitive events? They feel singular. Can we delineate between repetition and reproduction?

Of course we have to go back to the great theorist of repetition, Gertrude Stein. "Beginning again and again is a natural thing, even when there is a series."

Kierkegaard, /Repetition/, ventriloquizing a fictional philosopher called Constantin Constantius. "What would life be if there were no repetition? Who would want to be a tablet on which time writes something new every instant or to be a memorial volume of the past?"

A model of time in which the past is constantly being called up in recollection, which sponsors the not yet, the future. Repetition mediates the no more and the not yet, flattening time in the process. The no more is no longer no more, the not yet is made present too.

"Repetition is the Amazon warehouse floor of the present."

"I think that Kierkegaard's really onto something here!" Repetition as C19's bourgeois flattening and control of time. Repetition is the mode of reproduction of bourgeois life, to which we are all meant to adhere whether it's our class position or not.

Ernst Bloch: "All this means is that man is essentially determined by the future, but with the cynically self-interested inference, hypostasized from its own class position, that the future is the sign outside the No Future night club, and the destiny of man nothingness."

"The bourgeois relationship to time is the *bad immediacy*."
1 reply 0 retweets 1 like

"I'm going to try to take the future sign off the No Future night club so we don't walk into the wrong one."

Reading from novel, with "one of the ubiquitous Emilies," a precariously employed millennial who has basically been deprived of every joy by capitalism, who is trying to work out what the fuck.

"The problem wasn't that there was no future; the problem was that there was too much of one." Making a future that we can only dread, "torturing all meaning out of the minutes that they past." Fantasizing that the future won't come.

The thing about Kierkegaard and repetition, though, is that repetition is basically impossible. "The philosopher asks, 'what does it mean to be a poet?'...as philosophers do." Laughter. Too real.

The philosopher finds himself unable to repeat bc "revolutionary flies" keep flying around his home, refusing to simply replicate in an orderly fashion. [Side note: really interesting considering the way that images of drosophila have become THE image of predictable pop growth.]

So there is revolutionary possibility even in the bourgeois attempt to replicate exactly. Describing underground radical queer text /The Faggots and Their Friends Between Revolutions/, "cultivat[ing] the most obscure and outrageous parts of the past." https://contagionpress.com/books/faggots-and-their-friends-between-revolutions/

Anne [Boyer]'s closing keynote to the World Picture conference at Corpus Christi College, organized by @aria_impura and Jules O'Dwyer.
Anne.Boyer  Natalia.Cecire 
5 weeks ago
'Rethinking The Past' In The Aftermath Of California's Deadly Wildfires : NPR
'Rethinking The Past' In The Aftermath Of California's Deadly Wildfires
Kirk Siegler. NPR.
December 12, 2018
california 
5 weeks ago
Ekphrasis.pics – look/see/think/write
Editor’s note:
I reproduce this marvellous 1964 painting by the eminent photographer Bill Dane as an example of ‘Reverse Ekphrasis’. I coined* this term informally to comment on the painting elsewhere and a subsequent exchange led me to consider: ‘In what way would ‘reverse Ekphrasis’ differ from ‘Illustration’ – why complicate matters?
My answer is that Bill’s painting transcends illustration in the same way that the best Ekphrastic writing transcends simple description – it has qualities and dimensions all its own which supplement and develop at the highest level its subject – ‘Victory – an Island Tale’ the rich, odd, flawed late novel by Joseph Conrad.

. . . . .
ekphrasis  reverse.ekphrasis  Michael.Szpakowski 
6 weeks ago
The Fall of Night | Lapham’s Quarterly
Anne Boyer, The Fall of Night.
December 2018

. . . . .

Leopardi, in his Zibaldone, asserts that mystery lends night its poetic nature. “Notte,” he writes of the word night, “confounds objects so that the mind is only able to conceive a vague, indistinct, incomplete image, both of the night and whatever it contains.” To know the night is a lot like knowing poetry…
Anne.Boyer  giacomo.leopardi  night 
6 weeks ago
Charlotte Prodger's Bridgit: a memorable, rich and beguiling film | Art and design | The Guardian
Charlotte Prodger's Bridgit: a memorable, rich and beguiling film
Prodger interrogates the world as she attempts to locate herself
Adrian Searle. The Guardian / Turner Prize 2018. 4 December 2018
Charlotte.Prodger 
6 weeks ago
iPhone film-maker Charlotte Prodger wins 2018 Turner prize | Art and design | The Guardian
iPhone film-maker Charlotte Prodger wins 2018 Turner prize
Mark Brown. The Guardian. 4 December 2018
Charlotte.Prodger  dots  rows.of.dots 
6 weeks ago
Review: Who invented abstract art? Victor Hugo show at the Hammer proves critics and historians wrong - Los Angeles Times
Review: Who invented abstract art? Victor Hugo show at the Hammer proves critics and historians wrong

Christopher Knight. Los Angeles Times. December 4, 2018

. . . . .

Victor Hugo, Stains

The fable: Hilma af Klint (1862-1944), a Swedish mystic and painter of remarkable skills who is not well known in the United States, invented abstract art.
Her extraordinary artistic accomplishment preceded by several years that of Russian-born Vasily Kandinsky and Kazimir Malevich and the Netherlands’ Piet Mondrian, one or another of whom is usually credited as abstraction’s inventor around 1911.

. . . . .

Given the powerful part that abstract art would play in Europe and the Americas as the 20th century unfolded, becoming virtually synonymous with modernity, the new myth is dramatic. Of course, it also isn’t true. Hilma af Klint didn’t invent abstract art. The answer to the question “Who did?” is unambiguous: No one did.

Art doesn’t work that way. I’m not talking about the abstraction that is found in most every culture in most every age, including prehistoric, but of other modern European artists who had already been exploring abstraction. And decades earlier than Af Klint.

In London, at the height of the Victorian Era, Georgiana Houghton (1814–1884) began making vivid paintings on paper of colorful swirls, staccato dots, linear spirals, feathery marks and assorted shapes and forms of visual energy. The product of 10 years of work was shown in an 1871 exhibition at a gallery on Old Bond Street, center of London’s art quarter, where the 155 abstractions were greeted with stunned puzzlement and often ridicule.

. . . . .

Just as weary as a modernist belief in artistic progress is New York’s often-remarked provincialism — the assumption that if it didn’t happen in Manhattan, it didn’t happen.
Georgina.Houghton  abstraction  Victor.Hugo  Hilma.af.Klint 
6 weeks ago
Tumblr is banning adult content, and it's already not going over well - Los Angeles Times
Tumblr is banning adult content, and it's already not going over well
Jessica Roy. Los Angeles Times. December 3, 2018
. . . . .

A 2017 Glamour article about porn on Tumblr pointed out the site’s GIF-heavy and largely artistic approach to pornography is part of its appeal to its majority-female user base. If Tumblr’s changes make the site no longer a pornography destination nor a welcoming space for young LGBTQ people, and with the general trend of young people turning to newer mobile-friendly apps like Instagram and YouTube, who’s left to even want to use Tumblr?

A decade ago, LiveJournal made a similar pronouncement banning adult content. That site summarily deleted hundreds of blogs, and users abandoned the platform in droves.
tumblr 
6 weeks ago
Betting on a new way to make concrete that doesn’t pollute - The New York Times
Betting on a new way to make concrete that doesn’t pollute
A New Jersey firm is experimenting in a small town in England with a new formula that reduces the carbon dioxide emitted in the making of the building material.
Stanley Reed. NYTimes. December 2, 2018

cured with CO2, not with water.
concrete  infrastructure 
6 weeks ago
Declare the Strand Bookstore a City Landmark? No Thanks, the Strand Says - The New York Times
Declare the Strand Bookstore a City Landmark? No Thanks, the Strand Says
The beloved independent shop with 18 miles of books says that landmark status for its building could be a death blow.
Corey Kilgannon. NYTimes. December 3, 2018

. . . . .

That the Strand could be threatened by its own preservation seems like a plot twist worthy of one of its books, she said: The very agency entrusted with preserving the city’s treasures is endangering one of them.

Another rich twist, Ms. Wyden said, was that the move coincides with the announcement that Amazon — not exactly beloved by brick-and-mortar booksellers — plans to open a headquarters in Queens, after city and state leaders offered upwards of $2 billion in incentives to Amazon and its multibillionaire chief executive, Jeff Bezos.

“The richest man in America, who’s a direct competitor, has just been handed $3 billion in subsidies. I’m not asking for money or a tax rebate,” Ms. Wyden said. “Just leave me alone.”
book.sellers  just.leave.me.alone 
6 weeks ago
Ahmed Ansari on Twitter: "I dislike arguments based on cultural capital - elitistcolonial and parochialist undertones...high gateways are immunological mechanisms meant precisely to discourage would-be interlopers in a cultural "sphere' where they're not
cameron tonkinwise
‏@camerontw

no excuse now for any design program, even the 'become a UX designer in 2 days in our cowork space' crowd, not to have at least one moment in which would-be practitioners are required to think about the foundations and consequences of their practice

Ahmed Ansari
PhD students living in near-constant financial precarity can't afford a ~$50 dollar e-book. Like all things under contemporary capitalism, bootstrapping critical reflection via exposure to theoretical discourse comes only to those who can afford it.

cameron tonkinwise
@camerontw

More
pretty disingenuous; as you would know, this is a reader - nearly all the articles are available online already, especially at ªªhttp://www.thestudioattheedgeoftheworld.com/writing.html ºº; the much greater barrier is acquiring the cultural capital required to read theoretical discourse, even if free

Ahmed Ansari
‏@aansari86

More
No, the disingenuous move is precisely that a reader, which has articles that have appeared on Tony's website for free (T&F charges for DPP), should be asking $50-$150 to buy given that the entire point of a reader is as a "gateway" text for novices.

Ahmed Ansari
‏@aansari86

More
Replying to @aansari86 @camerontw
I dislike arguments based on cultural capital - elitist\colonial and parochialist undertones...high gateways are immunological mechanisms meant precisely to discourage would-be interlopers in a cultural "sphere' where they're not wanted

cameron tonkinwise
@camerontw

I do not understand this comment; the point of cultural capital analyses are to expose those immunological gateways and the structural colonialisms by which they have force and reproduce themselves

cameron tonkinwise
‏@camerontw

More
or maybe the strategy, as per my tweet, is to get wealthy people to spend their money on something that just might give them pause when deploying their privileged design capabilities; no one was insisting that it is the only gateway

Ahmed Ansari
@aansari86

For someone rich enough, spending $150 is penny change; for a school that has has its budgets slashed and is having to deliberate over what intellectual capital to invest in, $150 is a big deal.

cameron tonkinwise
‏@camerontw

another example (more extreme than the Design Philosophy Reader) of the design publishing industry curating existing (Eurocentric & male dominated) texts (though in this case, mostly difficult to find ones) into for-library-affordability-only
points to Huppatz, ed.,
Design : Critical and Primary Sources (4 vols)
https://www.bloomsbury.com/au/design-9781472539366/

Ahmed Ansari
‏@aansari86
Replying to @aansari86 @camerontw
Now, a truly generous gesture worthy of the true gift, would be to release the epub for free as soon as the book was out.

cameron tonkinwise
‏@camerontw
of who are you making this demand: Bloomsbury, Anne-Marie or me? - Bloomsbury has not required that their republishing entail the removal of http://www.thestudioattheedgeoftheworld.com/writing.html
cameron.tonkinwise  ahmed.ansari  design.discourse  guys.guys  tonedeaf 
7 weeks ago
Lena Dunham is a hugely original writer. Who cares if she’s a good person? | Martha Gill | Opinion | The Guardian
Lena Dunham is a hugely original writer. Who cares if she’s a good person?
Abusing the comedy writer is now an online sport. Behind it lies something truly ugly

Martha Gill. The Guardian. CIF. 1 December 2018

"These are grave charges to bring against an elected representative, the head of a hospital trust or an on-duty school teacher."
humor  irony 
7 weeks ago
She's not buying a doll, she's adopting a space baby — and choosing the store over the internet - Los Angeles Times
She's not buying a doll, she's adopting a space baby — and choosing the store over the internet
Donald D. White. Los Angeles Times. December 1, 2018

. . . . .

As Claire Talerico videotaped her daughter Mia finalizing baby adoption paperwork with a nurse, two things stood out.

For one thing, Mia is just 10 years old. For another, Mia’s baby resembled a pink lacrosse ball with a tiny body attached.

This wasn’t a real adoption. The fictional nurse was an employee of Distroller World, a boutique Mexican toy chain that is about to open its third U.S. store, in Glendale.

“There are no other toys like them,” Mia said of the 12 Distroller babies she has adopted. “At home, we made them a nursery, then I built a little school for them. We even make up voices for them.”

Distroller World is an elaborate example of experience-based retail — where shoppers get to do something rather than just buy something. It’s a style that merchants increasingly are trying out to recapture business lost to the internet.
. . . . .

But experience retail can have drawbacks. It may involve more training — and possibly bigger paychecks — for employees who must then act out the roles they play well enough for an enjoyable consumer experience.

Recruiting, training and retaining employees who can fulfill this kind of role-playing “within the razor-thin margins of retailing will be difficult,” said Denise Lee Yohn, a branding expert and author of “Fusion: How Integrating Brand and Culture Powers the World's Greatest Companies.”

And it isn’t just one story that has to be mastered and presented; if the experience doesn’t evolve with new elements and events, it will quickly grow stale and lose its appeal, experts said.

“You have to constantly freshen things up,” Silver said. “It can’t be the same old, same old, or a child will go two or three times and get bored.”
retail 
7 weeks ago
Sunset magazine, a California icon, struggles as advertisers turn away from print - Los Angeles Times
Sunset magazine, a California icon, struggles as advertisers turn away from print

Meg James. Los Angeles Times. November 30, 2018
california  publishing 
7 weeks ago
This Is the Way the Paper Crumples
This is how the paper crumples
In a ball of paper, scientists discover a landscape of surprising mathematical order.

Paper is an ideal model for studying other crumpling challenges, such as how DNA packs into a cell, or how best to cram a giant solar sail into a small satellite.

Siobhan Roberts. NYTimes. 26-27 November 2018
paper  fold  crumpling  topology 
7 weeks ago
Ricky Jay, Gifted Magician, Actor and Author, Is Dead at 70 - The New York Times
Ricky Jay, Gifted Magician, Actor and Author, Is Dead at 70

Anita Gates. NYTimes. November 25, 2018
Ricky.Jay  obituaries  prestidigitation 
7 weeks ago
AIBOの葬式に密着
きょうの坊主めくり

AIBOの葬式に密着 (close contact with AIBO funeral)
ルンバ、AIスピーカーが弔われる日
鵜飼 秀徳 Hidenori Ukai
日経ビジネスオンライン
2018年11月26日
. . . . .

these robots are retired (euthanized) to provide spare parts for other survivors.

. . . . .

That was a strange pet burial we never saw before. There are more than 100 animated "dogs" secretly enshrined in the altar set up in the main hall. When the church duty begins, the attendant wearing mourning will burn incense burning with a subtle expression.

It was the funeral of "AIBO (Aibo)" that was held at Nichiren Shoso Kofukuji in Chiba prefecture Isumi city. AIBO is a dog type robot that Sony born. The funeral of AIBO started from 2015 and counted the sixth on April 26, 2018 I visited. It is the impression that pet burial is also here at extreme.

Two years ago, only 17 AIBOs were condoliated at the time of the first funeral. However, the number of AIBO to be donated increased every time it was repeated. In the fifth funeral in June of 2017, it exceeded 100, this time "guidance" was handed to 114 cars. Two AIBO wearing a quarter, "Southern Heroes Lotus Senchu", also performed a performance advocating the subject.
AIBO  funeral.practices  japan 
7 weeks ago
Ricky Jay, magician with appearances in ‘Boogie Nights’ and ‘Magnolia,’ dies at 72 - Los Angeles Times
Los Angeles Times. November 25, 2018

original and very thin version was AP only.
later updated, expanded and attributed to Sonaiya Kelley.
Ricky.Jay  obituaries  prestidigitation 
7 weeks ago
Andika Perkasa: Jejak Langkah Pengawal Presiden « IndoPROGRESS
Andika Perkasa: Jejak Langkah Pengawal Presiden
Made Supriatma
Harian IndoPROGRESS. 4 November 2014

. . . . .

Keputusan mengangkat Brigjen Andika Perkasa, yang saat itu menjabat Kadispen TNI-AD, tak pelak memancing kontroversi. Moeldoko sendiri mengelak menjelaskan prestasi apa yang dimiliki oleh Andika Perkasa sehingga pantas mendapat jabatan itu. Jabatan ini akan menyandang pangkat Mayor Jendral. Sementara baru setahun sebelumnya, Andika Perkasa mendapat kenaikan pangkat menjadi Brigadir Jendral.

Pengakuan Moeldoko kepada pers juga terasa janggal karena biasanya jenjang kepangkatan dan jabatan perwira tinggi diputuskan oleh sidang Dewan Jabatan dan Kepangkatan Tinggi (Wanjakti) TNI. Saat Moeldoko bertanya pun sesungguhnya Jokowi belum menjadi presiden RI. Tak pelak, ini menguatkan dugaan bahwa pengangkatan Andika Perkasa adalah pengangkatan politik (political appointment) ketimbang promosi militer yang profesional.

Apa yang membuat karir militer Andika Perkasa menjadi sedemikian istimewa? Apakah karir militer Andika Perkasa merupakan pola umum di dalam TNI, khususnya Angkatan Darat? Apa konsekuensi promosi seperti ini terhadap administrasi pemerintahan Jokowi?

Tulisan ini mencoba merangkai rekam jejak karir militer Andika Perkasa. Rekam jejak ini akan menjadi contoh kasus hubungan sipil-militer di masa pemerintahan Jokowi.

via
https://twitter.com/moniksembiring/status/1065503899484774400
indonesia 
8 weeks ago
The world's best building? A remote Brazilian school made out of wood | Art and design | The Guardian
The world's best building? A remote Brazilian school made out of wood
This year’s Royal Institute of British Architects prize goes to the timber and mud-brick Children Village, which doesn’t need air-con even in 45 degree heat

Oliver Wainwright. The Guardian. 21 November 2018
eucalyptus  architecture  Oliver.Wainwright 
8 weeks ago
Tan Lin. A Few Versions of Earliness / Triple Canopy
“What, after all, can we do with our father’s missing presents except to find them again, like a missing relative or a devotional object, and to catalog them in the years of a later happiness?” A posthumous search for a father; or, the more or less true history of a family.

A Few Versions of Earliness
by Tan Lin

20 November 2018
Tan.Lin 
8 weeks ago
Trying to get a handle on California’s deadly wildfires has lawmakers flummoxed - Los Angeles Times
Trying to get a handle on California’s deadly wildfires has lawmakers flummoxed
George Skelton. Los Angeles Times. November 19, 2018
california 
8 weeks ago
California fires: Trump administration now blames devastation on 'radical environmentalists' - Los Angeles Times
California fires: Trump administration now blames devastation on 'radical environmentalists'
Alejandra Reyes-Velarde and Joseph Serna
Los Angeles Times, November 19, 2018
california 
8 weeks ago
Indonesia's love affair with its dying natural disaster spokesman
Indonesia's love affair with its dying natural disaster spokesman
Sutopo Purwo Nugroho, who has stage 4 cancer, guides the country through 2,300 disasters each year and has become a national treasure

Kate Lamb. The Guardian. 17 November 2018
indonesia 
8 weeks ago
“I Don’t Think Character Exists Anymore”: A Conversation with Rachel Cusk | The New Yorker
The New Yorker Interview
“I Don’t Think Character Exists Anymore”: A Conversation with Rachel Cusk
Alexandra Schwartz
The New Yorker
November 18, 2018
rachel.cusk 
8 weeks ago
Finally, a Machine That Can Finish Your Sentence - The New York Times
Finally, a Machine That Can Finish Your Sentence
Completing someone else’s thought is not an easy trick for A.I. But new systems are starting to crack the code of natural language.

Cade Metz. NYTimes. November 18, 2018

. . . . .

These new language systems learn by analyzing millions of sentences written by humans. A system built by OpenAI, a lab based in San Francisco, analyzed thousands of self-published books, including romance novels, science fiction and more. Google’s Bert analyzed these same books plus the length and breadth of Wikipedia.

Each system learned a particular skill by analyzing all that text. OpenAI’s technology learned to guess the next word in a sentence. Bert learned to guess missing words anywhere in a sentence. But in mastering these specific tasks, they also learned about how language is pieced together.

If Bert can guess the missing words in millions of sentences (such as “the man walked into a store and bought a ____ of milk”), it can also understand many of the fundamental relationships between words in the English language, said Jacob Devlin, the Google researcher who oversaw the creation of Bert. (Bert is short for Bidirectional Encoder Representations from Transformers.)

. . . . .

and so writing, a certain range of poetical "writing" — will and indeed has long already taken a turn away from means by which the "next word" is guessable...
AI  poetical.engines  new.sentence  new.narrative 
8 weeks ago
Ilse D’Hollander; Fiona Tan: Elsewhere – review | Art and design | The Guardian
Victoria Miro, London; Frith Street Gallery, London
Ilse D’Hollander’s serene landscapes from the 1990s betray no sign of this young artist’s inner turmoil. Plus, Fiona Tan’s utopian LA skylines

Laura Cumming. The Guardian / The Observer. 18 November 2018
Fiona.Tan  Ilse.D'Hollander  Laura.Cumming 
8 weeks ago
Mister Rogers: the quiet revolutionary of children's TV | Film | The Guardian
Mister Rogers: the quiet revolutionary of children's TV
For 33 years, a man in a cardigan brought a gentle thoughtfulness to US TV show Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood. Now a film about it is breaking records. Hadley Freeman talks to the director – and shows the original TV series to her children

Hadley Freeman. The Guardian. 8 November 2018
Mister.Rogers 
10 weeks ago
Millennial men leave a perplexing hole in the hot U.S. job market - Los Angeles Times
Millennial men leave a perplexing hole in the hot U.S. job market
Jianna Smialek. Bloomberg / LATImes. November 2, 2018
絶望 
11 weeks ago
The most disgusting food in the world – in pictures | Food | The Guardian
The most disgusting food in the world – in pictures

The Museum of Disgusting Food, which has opened in Malmö, Sweden, showcases the most horrible food from around the globe and challenges perceptions of what is edible

Sarah Gilbert
The Guardian. 31 October 2018 1
disgust  food 
11 weeks ago
Disgust vs. Delight: Why Do Certain Foods Turn You Off?
Disgust vs. Delight: Why Do Certain Foods Turn You Off?
“I want people to question what they find disgusting,” said the lead curator and chief financier of the Disgusting Food Museum, a touring pop-up exhibition in Malmo, Sweden.

By Christina Anderson
NYTimes. October 30, 2018

print version October 31, better (and as usual more accurate) title —
That Food’s Disgusting! But Why, Museum Asks.
food  disgust 
11 weeks ago
Red pill or blue? It could be a billion-dollar decision | BioPharma Dive
Jacob Bell. Red pill or blue? It could be a billion-dollar decision
biopharmadrive. October 29, 2018
color 
11 weeks ago
How drugmakers decide the color of their pills - Axios
Sam Baker. Axios. 31 October 2018

points to
Jacob Bell. Red pill or blue? It could be a billion-dollar decision
biopharmadrive. October 29, 2018
https://www.biopharmadive.com/news/red-pill-or-blue-it-could-be-a-billion-dollar-decision/539283/
color 
11 weeks ago
Dear Reader, Are You Reading? - The Scholarly Kitchen
Karin Wolf. October 23, 2018

focus on Wolf, but survey of the field, too.

"
MaryAnne Wolf’s Reader, Come Home:  The Reading Brain in a Digital World (2018) returns after 10 years to map a cognitive landscape that was only beginning to take shape in her earlier book, Proust and the Squid:  The Story and Science of the Reading Brain (2008).  Like Naomi Baron, whose Always On:  Language in an Online and Mobile World was published in 2008 and Words on Screen:  The Fate of Reading in a Digital World appeared in 2015, Wolf was a literary scholar first and became captivated by the study of language in action. In Baron’s case this meant a PhD in semiotics; in Wolf’s, in cognitive neuroscience. The challenge and the passion they share from different disciplinary perspectives and grounding, though each is extraordinarily creative in their multidisciplinary approach, is for reading. What is reading, and what is happening to reading?

"These are historical as well as scientific questions, for reading itself is a highly politicized and romanticized activity. Cathy Davidson is another literary scholar who now works in education and technology; her 1986 Revolution and the Word:  The Rise of the Novel in America sketched the anxiety (even hostility) of early American elites to the increasing variety and availability of novels, and what kind of awful ideas they might implant in their readers, especially women. Harvard scholar Leah Price, who met literature and never left it, is about to publish Overbooked: Dispatches from the Front Lines of the Reading Wars, which argues that an embrace of ever more accessible print, and its unique capacity to edify and refine individual readers and the body politic, is an artifact of the Victorian era.
"
reading  reading.history 
12 weeks ago
Jennifer Santiago, 33, said that she is definitely not voting this year
As Democrats Court Latinos, Indifference Is a Powerful Foe
Jose A. Del Real and Jonathan Martin
Oct. 21, 2018

Jennifer Santiago, 33, said that she is definitely not voting this year, and feels that things in America will not change for the better no matter who is in office.

I'll have what she's having.
politics  persuasive 
12 weeks ago
Paris on Foot: 35 Miles, 6 Days and One Blistered Toe - The New York Times
Paris on Foot: 35 Miles, 6 Days and One Blistered Toe
A journey around the perimeter of Paris, exploring neighborhoods well off the tourist-beaten path, revealed a city at once familiar and yet startlingly new.
David McAninch. NYTimes. October 22, 2018

ha!
even a comment by

Geoffrey James
Toronto31m ago
A good piece. The master of this genre is Iain Sinclair who has walked the London ring road (London Orbital) and is credited with being one of the founders of psychogeography. The Invention of Paris by Eric Hazan is also terrific. I share his view that the real energy is on the outskirts. Beautiful though Paris is, it has lost much of its flavor. Marly le Roi has the ruin/ skeleton of Louis XIV summer place and an incredible 18th Century fantasy garden, the Desert de Retz. I photographed all this stuff 40 years ago when it was truly obscure.
paris  walking 
12 weeks ago
JF Ptak Science Books: Alphabet Tubes (1895)
The Domincan priest Father Vincenzo Calendoli invented (between 1893 to 1895) an unusual and seemingly-simple-but-hardly-so linotype machine that was seen by some as “the typsetting machine of the future...”(--C. Cochrane, American Printer and Lithographer, vols 21-23, 1896). The image below shows Calendoli in serene concentration seated at his machine which looks like a cross between a small Jacquard loom and an odd harpsichord (emphasis on the harp).

..

The Scientific American Supplement (1895, pp 16055-16057) illustration is reproduced exactly in an uncommon publication called the Rosary Magazine, (1895)--exact, with the exception of the additional caption: the writer annotates it by identifying the “checker board”, “inclined wire and galleys”, and the indescribably beautifully-named “alphabet tubes”! The explanation of what this tube is is far less interesting than its title--tubes filled with type-- though the machine overall was extraordinary.

Here are a few notices on Calendoli's machine, all from Typographical Journal, vol 30, 1900.

“The machine which will eventually control the market and supplant the typesetting machines now in use will not be properly speaking a typesetting machine but a combination of typewriters tape punching devices and type bar or type block forming machine...Father Calendoli's machine has hit upon an idea in keyboard mechanism which must eventually supersede present keyboards. He makes use of fifteen alphabets each of which is arranged in a square or block the keys in each block being so separated and colored as to be readily distinguished. In each block the letters are so arranged that a number of common words and syllables may be struck in order....”

“The invention: Imagine a kind of harp whose cords are replaced by metallic tubes adhering to each other in four series. These tubes communicated through an electrical device with a keyboard or rather checker board divided into twenty one small squares covered with electrical knobs three for caps fifteen for ordinary letters and the remainder for figures and accented vowels. Points of punctuation and accents formed a horizontal line on the lowest part of the checker board and were operated with a pedal. Each letter was printed on the little knobs and to avoid useless motions of the arms the squares were repeated three by three. In these squares the consonants were not repeated but the vowels were triplicated and surrounded the consonants in a very ingenious way which permitted the composing of most of the syllables with a single finger in touching two knobs at once as be bi bo bu etc..”

“...Father Calendoli's machine has hit upon an idea in keyboard mechanism which must eventually supersede present keyboards. He makes use of fifteen alphabets each of which is arranged in a square or block the keys in each block being so separated and colored as to be readily distinguished. In each block the letters are so arranged that a number of common words and syllables may be struck in order....”

“The machine which will eventually control the market and supplant the typesetting machines now in use will not be properly speaking a typesetting machine but a combination of typewriters tape punching devices and type bar or type block forming machines...”

“Happy will be the compositor who fifty or a hundred years hence can look down from printers heaven and note the progress made in the art since he laid down his composing stick.”

“.. ingenious combination of type tubes...When the keys are struck electric impulses are given to wires which release types from certain tubes. The length of these tubes is so arranged that the longest slide or fall is given to the last letter of the set and a proportionately shorter slide to the others so that each is sure to fall in proper order although the whole four or live are struck simultaneously. It is obviously necessary to employ fifteen sets of type tubes as there must be a tube for every key on the keyboard...”
typesetting  poetical.engines  Vincenzo.Calendoli  alphabet  alphabets  alphabet.tubes 
12 weeks ago
Private schools told to open their swimming pools to state pupils | Education | The Guardian
Private schools told to open their swimming pools to state pupils
Move reflects fears for half of British children unable to swim 25 metres by the age of 11
Eleni Courea
The Guardian / Observer.
21 October 2018
swimming.pools 
october 2018
Aneang, a. unspacious, unample... Aneffaith, a. void of effect
William Spurrell. 1853
A Dictionary of the Welsh Language: With English Synonymes and Explanations

Andawiad, n.m. a listening

Andred, n.m. an untrodden spot
Andwyo, v. to disorder, to ruin

Aneang, a. unspacious, unample...
Aneffaith, a. void of effect
Aneglwg, a. void of splendour

Anelwig, a. shapeless, unformed
Anelyf, a. void of music.
Anenw, a. nameless
an  un  sadness  raw.material 
october 2018
Knowledge Considered as a Weed Killer
Mary Midgley, 99, Moral Philosopher for the General Reader, Is Dead
John Motyka. NYTimes. October 15, 2018

A version of this article appears in print on Oct. 18, 2018, on Page B14 of the New York edition with the headline: Mary Midgley, Accessible, Acerbic Critic Within Moral Philosophy, Dies at 99

. . . . .

"Knowledge Considered as a Weed Killer"
Mary.Midgley  philosophers  obituaries 
october 2018
The Strangest Desert Festival In the World Makes Everyone’s Mad Max Dreams Come True
The Strangest Desert Festival In the World Makes Everyone’s Mad Max Dreams Come True
Jalopnik. Anna Merlan. (October 12?) 2018
desert 
october 2018
Last Leaf First Snowflake to Fall - YouTube
This animated short film is subtitled in Anishinaabemowin and features the artwork of Leo Yerxa.

Last Leaf First Snowflake to Fall featured a series of images constructed of thin paper, acrylic paint and line drawings. It was first published as a children’s picture book by Groundwood Books in 1993. In 2017 the North America Native Museum (NONAM) in Zurich, Switzerland featured the series of images as part of the exhibit, “Stories from the Woodland.” Long before Paper Art became socially acceptable, Yerxa turned layers of fiber and color into layers of memories as he recalled a journey between seasons. The original works, which became two children’s books, took about thirty years to complete. As part of an exhibit NONAM created an animated version of the story which was translated by Margaret Noodin and Michael Zimmerman who then also read the story for the film with help from Fionna Noori.
Leo.Yerxa 
october 2018
Leo Yerxa (1947-2017)
Obituary: Ojibway artist Leo Yerxa bridged gulf between Indigenous and European art
Blair Crawford. Ottawa Citizen. September 18, 2017
leo.yerxa 
october 2018
Seseq on Twitter: "Liquifaksi di Kab Sigi - Palu Selatan. Satelite image frame by frame..."
Liquifaksi di Kab Sigi - Palu Selatan. Satelite image frame by frame...

Seseq
‏@sheque
5 October 2018
indonesia  liquefaction 
october 2018
Details of an item from the British Library Catalogue of Illuminated Manuscripts
Detailed record for Additional 10628
Author John Somer
Title Calendar (ff. 1-10), Kalendarium of John Somer and astronomical texts (ff. 10-34)
Origin England, S.W.
Date c.1383-1384
Language Latin
Script Gothic
Decoration A full-page diagram of Zodiac Man in brown and black (f. 25). A full page diagram of the palm of a hand with symbols in red, blue and brown (f. 34). Circular volvelles (f. 34*). Circular eclipse diagrams in red, brown, blue and yellow (ff. 28-30v). Tables and circular diagrams (ff. 26v, 32) in brown and red. A puzzle initial in red with penwork decoration in brown (f. 10). KL initials in red.
Dimensions in mm 275 x 180 (210/30 x 135/50)

via
https://twitter.com/erik_kwakkel/status/1047260041416511488
volvelles 
october 2018
Karl Lagerfeld makes waves with catwalk beach at Chanel show (Paris)
Lauren Cochrane. The Guardian. 2 October 2018

. . . . .

and this —


This generation may also approve of the brand’s sustainability drive. In a post-show announcement, Chanel said the water used for the scenery would be reprocessed by the Paris sewage system and the sand recycled by the construction industry.
Karl.Lagerfeld  fashion  life.guards  swimming.pools 
october 2018
Violating the Form – Work in Progress
Violating the Form
Rachel Cusk and Alexandra Schwartz
In Conversation
. . . . .

Schwartz: Well, maybe it’s old for a reason. What about the subtleties of character or the subtleties of self-expression, or different personal experience?

Cusk: I think those are shared. I’m not saying they don’t exist. I’m seeing them as more oceanic and as things that you can enter and leave in certain phases of your life that aren’t completely determined by the fact that you’re Jane and this is your life. I’m trying to see experience in a more lateral sense rather than as in this form of character. Which, as I said, I don’t actually think is how living is being done anymore. And it’s one of those ideas that hangs around in novel writing that I don’t really believe anymore.

. . . . .

Schwartz: The end of this book is extraordinary, and it is deeply troubling. It’s almost like being thrust into a storm that has been building and finally you’re under the storm, but it works in a very different way than how endings usually work, which is to resolve something. Instead, it seems to me to open a wound and to propose new problems. What happens is that Faye has finally broken away from all of her interlocutors and is alone on a beach and it seems to be a gay beach—there are only men there. And they are all naked, and she takes off her clothes and goes into the water, and a man approaches the water and stands over her, grinning, and pees at her. And just pees into the water as she’s swimming there. What do I make of this? Why?

Cusk: It has its own reason. I see it as an acceptance of an element of, not violence exactly, but separateness, distinction, and this question of men and women—which as I say I’ve fenced all around it and in the end I sort of had to conclude that whatever women are, they are institutionally disadvantaged. I needed to find not just an image for it, but a sort of feeling about it, a feeling about that victimhood which I could understand, which is so much to do with the production of children, the nurture of children, and the defense of them, which is increasingly a shared world and no one owns any of it—it’s changing all the time. But this, as I say, elemental difference that is sex itself, it’s not violent but it looks like it. So, the ending is really that—it’s crude I suppose, and primitive, and it’s about genitals, bodies, none of which are mentioned very much in any of the other three books, but then suddenly there they are.
rachel.cusk  character  cruelty  writing 
october 2018
HathiTrust Research Center Extends Non-Consumptive Research Tool... | HathiTrust Digital Library
Researchers may now use entire HathiTrust corpus — incl copyrighted items — for non-consumptive research via Research Center text and data mining tools.
raw.material  HathiTrust 
september 2018
You May Be Surprised to Hear That Restoration Hardware Is Doing Great - The New York Times
DOMAINS

You May Be Surprised to Hear That Restoration Hardware Is Doing Great
Restoration Hardware seemed doomed. Now, it’s a vast and booming bricks and mortar empire. What gives?

Penelope Green. NYTimes. September 19, 2018

A version of this article appears in print on Sept. 20, 2018, on Page D1 of the New York edition with the headline: A Home Goods Empire Rises Again.

beautifully written account.
hardware.stores  hardware 
september 2018
A giant crawling brain: the jaw-dropping world of termites | News | The Guardian
At least half of termite studies used to be about how to kill them. But science is discovering their extraordinary usefulness
Lisa Margonelli
The Guardian
18 September 2018

. . . . .

I had stumbled into one of the big questions termites pose, which is, roughly, what is “one” termite? Is it one individual termite? Is it one termite with its symbiotic gut microbes, an entity that can eat wood but cannot reproduce on its own? Or is it a colony, a whole living, breathing structure, occupied by a few million related individuals and a gazillion symbionts who collectively constitute “one”?

The issue of one is profound in every direction, with evolutionary, ecological and existential implications. By the end of that day I had a basic idea that the fewer I saw, the more termites there might be. Where I had thought of landscapes as the product of growth, on that afternoon they inverted to become the opposite: the remainders left behind by the forces of persistent and massive chewing. The sky was no longer the sky, but the blue stuff that is visible after the screening brush and cacti have been eaten away. Termites have made the world by unmaking parts of it. They are the architects of negative space. The engineers of not.

. . . . .

…Termites make the mounds by first piling up dirt and then removing it strategically in the tunnels. Eyeless, they use their antennae to feel for smoothness, and in the big tunnels they remove everything that is rough. They may even hear the tunnel’s shape.

Termites are often compared to architects for the way they build their mounds, but that is misleading because they don’t have plans or a global vision. What they really have is an aesthetic, an innate sense of how things should feel.
termites  entomology  one  mereology  aesthetics  craft  architecture 
september 2018
The Rise of Writing: A Q&A with Deborah Brandt
Blog
The Rise of Writing: A Q&A with Deborah Brandt
May 17, 2018
By Blake Plante, NEH Research Intern

What happens when writing becomes more common than reading? In a time when it is easier than ever for people to publish their sentiments, what kinds of risks do writers face? Millions of Americans now spend much of their working days “with their hands on keyboards and their minds on audiences,” writes Deborah Brandt in her latest book, The Rise of Writing: Redefining Mass Literacy (Cambridge University Press, 2015). Her publication explores the effects of writing as a new and dominating form of mass literacy.

. . . . .

When I began this project I could not imagine how anyone could write more than they read, but over the course of the adult lifespan, that seems to be happening. Writing is crowding out reading. People read to write, of course, and read during writing—but reading now more commonly occurs as part of the act of writing, as part of a production process. That strikes me as a new development in the history of mass literacy.
reading  writing  Deborah.Brandt 
september 2018
A rare interview with Comme des Garçons designer Rei Kawakubo | Fashion | The Guardian
The Fashion autumn/winter 2018
A rare interview with Comme des Garçons designer Rei Kawakubo
High-concept, high-fashion and radical, designer Kawakubo is considered the queen of fashion. Jess Cartner-Morley meets the designer at her headquarters in Paris

by Jess Cartner-Morley, styling, Helen Seamons, photographs, Jason Heatherington

The Guardian. 15 September 2018
Rei.Kawakubo  fashion 
september 2018
What’s in the sweeping copyright bill just passed by the European Parliament | Ars Technica
COPYRIGHT OVERHAUL —
What’s in the sweeping copyright bill just passed by the European Parliament
Legislation now goes to a three-way negotiation within the EU.
Timothy B. Lee. ArsTechnica - 9/12/2018
. . . .
The legislation makes online platforms like Google and Facebook directly liable for content uploaded by their users and mandates greater "cooperation" with copyright holders to police the uploading of infringing works. It also gives news publishers a new, special right to restrict how their stories are featured by news aggregators such as Google News. And it creates a new right for sports teams that could limit the ability of fans to share images and videos online.

Today's vote was not the end of Europe's copyright fight. Under the European Union's convoluted process for approving legislation, the proposal will now become the subject of a three-way negotiation involving the European Parliament, the Council of the Europe Union (representing national governments), and the European Commission (the EU's executive branch). If those three bodies agree to a final directive, then it will be sent to each of the 28 EU member countries (or more likely 27 thanks to Brexit) for implementation in national laws.
copyright 
september 2018
What Termites Can Teach Us | The New Yorker
Annals of Entomology
September 17, 2018 Issue
What Termites Can Teach Us
Roboticists are fascinated by their “swarm intelligence,” biologists by their ability to turn grass into energy. But can humans replicate their achievements?
By Amia Srinivasan

references Lisa Margonelli her “Underbug: An Obsessive Tale of Termites and Technology”
entomology  termites  the.problem.of.the.male 
september 2018
"In English, attention is something we pay. In Spanish, attention is something we lend. In French, attention is something we make. And in Farsi, attention is something we do."
Nyusha on Twitter:
@gole_yaas

In English, attention is something we pay.
In Spanish, attention is something we lend.
In French, attention is something we make.
And in Farsi, attention is something we do.

1:40 AM - 12 Sep 2018

good thread
attention  lexicon 
september 2018
The empty city: New York without New Yorkers – in pictures | Cities | The Guardian
The empty city: New York without New Yorkers – in pictures

Charles Johnstone was given one of the last batches of the toxic chemicals and paper that make cibachrome images. He used it to seek out empty places across New York’s five boroughs

11 September 2018
. . . . .

Charles Johnstone’s portfolio includes Brooklyn Corrugated Iron Fences, Thirty Four Basketball Courts, A Few Empty Pools, Some New York Handball Courts, and New York Storefront Churches, printed in the luminous cibachrome colour process
Charles.Johnstone  photographer  photography 
september 2018
Rustic speech and folk-lore : Wright, Elizabeth Mary, 1863-1958
Rustic speech and folk-lore. Humphrey Milford / OUP, 1913
Elizabeth Mary Wright (1863-1958)

this is UC copy, others available.

opens to chatper 19, Weather lore and farming terms

"When the sky has a <i>cruddled</i> appearance, that is, when it is covered with small fleecy clouds called Hen-scrattins (Sc. n.Cy. Midl.), it means that the weather will be : Neither long wet nor yet long dry. The same is said of the long streaky clouds called Filly-tails (Sc. n.Cy), Mares'-tails (gen. dials.), and Goat's-hair (Nhb.).
Elizabeth.Mary.Wright  Joseph.Wright  weather  dialect 
september 2018
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