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Mister Rogers: the quiet revolutionary of children's TV | Film | The Guardian
Mister Rogers: the quiet revolutionary of children's TV
For 33 years, a man in a cardigan brought a gentle thoughtfulness to US TV show Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood. Now a film about it is breaking records. Hadley Freeman talks to the director – and shows the original TV series to her children

Hadley Freeman. The Guardian. 8 November 2018
Mister.Rogers 
5 days ago
Millennial men leave a perplexing hole in the hot U.S. job market - Los Angeles Times
Millennial men leave a perplexing hole in the hot U.S. job market
Jianna Smialek. Bloomberg / LATImes. November 2, 2018
絶望 
11 days ago
The most disgusting food in the world – in pictures | Food | The Guardian
The most disgusting food in the world – in pictures

The Museum of Disgusting Food, which has opened in Malmö, Sweden, showcases the most horrible food from around the globe and challenges perceptions of what is edible

Sarah Gilbert
The Guardian. 31 October 2018 1
disgust  food 
13 days ago
Disgust vs. Delight: Why Do Certain Foods Turn You Off?
Disgust vs. Delight: Why Do Certain Foods Turn You Off?
“I want people to question what they find disgusting,” said the lead curator and chief financier of the Disgusting Food Museum, a touring pop-up exhibition in Malmo, Sweden.

By Christina Anderson
NYTimes. October 30, 2018

print version October 31, better (and as usual more accurate) title —
That Food’s Disgusting! But Why, Museum Asks.
food  disgust 
13 days ago
Red pill or blue? It could be a billion-dollar decision | BioPharma Dive
Jacob Bell. Red pill or blue? It could be a billion-dollar decision
biopharmadrive. October 29, 2018
color 
13 days ago
How drugmakers decide the color of their pills - Axios
Sam Baker. Axios. 31 October 2018

points to
Jacob Bell. Red pill or blue? It could be a billion-dollar decision
biopharmadrive. October 29, 2018
https://www.biopharmadive.com/news/red-pill-or-blue-it-could-be-a-billion-dollar-decision/539283/
color 
13 days ago
Dear Reader, Are You Reading? - The Scholarly Kitchen
Karin Wolf. October 23, 2018

focus on Wolf, but survey of the field, too.

"
MaryAnne Wolf’s Reader, Come Home:  The Reading Brain in a Digital World (2018) returns after 10 years to map a cognitive landscape that was only beginning to take shape in her earlier book, Proust and the Squid:  The Story and Science of the Reading Brain (2008).  Like Naomi Baron, whose Always On:  Language in an Online and Mobile World was published in 2008 and Words on Screen:  The Fate of Reading in a Digital World appeared in 2015, Wolf was a literary scholar first and became captivated by the study of language in action. In Baron’s case this meant a PhD in semiotics; in Wolf’s, in cognitive neuroscience. The challenge and the passion they share from different disciplinary perspectives and grounding, though each is extraordinarily creative in their multidisciplinary approach, is for reading. What is reading, and what is happening to reading?

"These are historical as well as scientific questions, for reading itself is a highly politicized and romanticized activity. Cathy Davidson is another literary scholar who now works in education and technology; her 1986 Revolution and the Word:  The Rise of the Novel in America sketched the anxiety (even hostility) of early American elites to the increasing variety and availability of novels, and what kind of awful ideas they might implant in their readers, especially women. Harvard scholar Leah Price, who met literature and never left it, is about to publish Overbooked: Dispatches from the Front Lines of the Reading Wars, which argues that an embrace of ever more accessible print, and its unique capacity to edify and refine individual readers and the body politic, is an artifact of the Victorian era.
"
reading  reading.history 
21 days ago
Jennifer Santiago, 33, said that she is definitely not voting this year
As Democrats Court Latinos, Indifference Is a Powerful Foe
Jose A. Del Real and Jonathan Martin
Oct. 21, 2018

Jennifer Santiago, 33, said that she is definitely not voting this year, and feels that things in America will not change for the better no matter who is in office.

I'll have what she's having.
politics  persuasive 
22 days ago
Paris on Foot: 35 Miles, 6 Days and One Blistered Toe - The New York Times
Paris on Foot: 35 Miles, 6 Days and One Blistered Toe
A journey around the perimeter of Paris, exploring neighborhoods well off the tourist-beaten path, revealed a city at once familiar and yet startlingly new.
David McAninch. NYTimes. October 22, 2018

ha!
even a comment by

Geoffrey James
Toronto31m ago
A good piece. The master of this genre is Iain Sinclair who has walked the London ring road (London Orbital) and is credited with being one of the founders of psychogeography. The Invention of Paris by Eric Hazan is also terrific. I share his view that the real energy is on the outskirts. Beautiful though Paris is, it has lost much of its flavor. Marly le Roi has the ruin/ skeleton of Louis XIV summer place and an incredible 18th Century fantasy garden, the Desert de Retz. I photographed all this stuff 40 years ago when it was truly obscure.
paris  walking 
22 days ago
JF Ptak Science Books: Alphabet Tubes (1895)
The Domincan priest Father Vincenzo Calendoli invented (between 1893 to 1895) an unusual and seemingly-simple-but-hardly-so linotype machine that was seen by some as “the typsetting machine of the future...”(--C. Cochrane, American Printer and Lithographer, vols 21-23, 1896). The image below shows Calendoli in serene concentration seated at his machine which looks like a cross between a small Jacquard loom and an odd harpsichord (emphasis on the harp).

..

The Scientific American Supplement (1895, pp 16055-16057) illustration is reproduced exactly in an uncommon publication called the Rosary Magazine, (1895)--exact, with the exception of the additional caption: the writer annotates it by identifying the “checker board”, “inclined wire and galleys”, and the indescribably beautifully-named “alphabet tubes”! The explanation of what this tube is is far less interesting than its title--tubes filled with type-- though the machine overall was extraordinary.

Here are a few notices on Calendoli's machine, all from Typographical Journal, vol 30, 1900.

“The machine which will eventually control the market and supplant the typesetting machines now in use will not be properly speaking a typesetting machine but a combination of typewriters tape punching devices and type bar or type block forming machine...Father Calendoli's machine has hit upon an idea in keyboard mechanism which must eventually supersede present keyboards. He makes use of fifteen alphabets each of which is arranged in a square or block the keys in each block being so separated and colored as to be readily distinguished. In each block the letters are so arranged that a number of common words and syllables may be struck in order....”

“The invention: Imagine a kind of harp whose cords are replaced by metallic tubes adhering to each other in four series. These tubes communicated through an electrical device with a keyboard or rather checker board divided into twenty one small squares covered with electrical knobs three for caps fifteen for ordinary letters and the remainder for figures and accented vowels. Points of punctuation and accents formed a horizontal line on the lowest part of the checker board and were operated with a pedal. Each letter was printed on the little knobs and to avoid useless motions of the arms the squares were repeated three by three. In these squares the consonants were not repeated but the vowels were triplicated and surrounded the consonants in a very ingenious way which permitted the composing of most of the syllables with a single finger in touching two knobs at once as be bi bo bu etc..”

“...Father Calendoli's machine has hit upon an idea in keyboard mechanism which must eventually supersede present keyboards. He makes use of fifteen alphabets each of which is arranged in a square or block the keys in each block being so separated and colored as to be readily distinguished. In each block the letters are so arranged that a number of common words and syllables may be struck in order....”

“The machine which will eventually control the market and supplant the typesetting machines now in use will not be properly speaking a typesetting machine but a combination of typewriters tape punching devices and type bar or type block forming machines...”

“Happy will be the compositor who fifty or a hundred years hence can look down from printers heaven and note the progress made in the art since he laid down his composing stick.”

“.. ingenious combination of type tubes...When the keys are struck electric impulses are given to wires which release types from certain tubes. The length of these tubes is so arranged that the longest slide or fall is given to the last letter of the set and a proportionately shorter slide to the others so that each is sure to fall in proper order although the whole four or live are struck simultaneously. It is obviously necessary to employ fifteen sets of type tubes as there must be a tube for every key on the keyboard...”
typesetting  poetical.engines  Vincenzo.Calendoli  alphabet  alphabets  alphabet.tubes 
22 days ago
Private schools told to open their swimming pools to state pupils | Education | The Guardian
Private schools told to open their swimming pools to state pupils
Move reflects fears for half of British children unable to swim 25 metres by the age of 11
Eleni Courea
The Guardian / Observer.
21 October 2018
swimming.pools 
24 days ago
Aneang, a. unspacious, unample... Aneffaith, a. void of effect
William Spurrell. 1853
A Dictionary of the Welsh Language: With English Synonymes and Explanations

Andawiad, n.m. a listening

Andred, n.m. an untrodden spot
Andwyo, v. to disorder, to ruin

Aneang, a. unspacious, unample...
Aneffaith, a. void of effect
Aneglwg, a. void of splendour

Anelwig, a. shapeless, unformed
Anelyf, a. void of music.
Anenw, a. nameless
an  un  sadness  raw.material 
26 days ago
Knowledge Considered as a Weed Killer
Mary Midgley, 99, Moral Philosopher for the General Reader, Is Dead
John Motyka. NYTimes. October 15, 2018

A version of this article appears in print on Oct. 18, 2018, on Page B14 of the New York edition with the headline: Mary Midgley, Accessible, Acerbic Critic Within Moral Philosophy, Dies at 99

. . . . .

"Knowledge Considered as a Weed Killer"
Mary.Midgley  philosophers  obituaries 
26 days ago
The Strangest Desert Festival In the World Makes Everyone’s Mad Max Dreams Come True
The Strangest Desert Festival In the World Makes Everyone’s Mad Max Dreams Come True
Jalopnik. Anna Merlan. (October 12?) 2018
desert 
29 days ago
Last Leaf First Snowflake to Fall - YouTube
This animated short film is subtitled in Anishinaabemowin and features the artwork of Leo Yerxa.

Last Leaf First Snowflake to Fall featured a series of images constructed of thin paper, acrylic paint and line drawings. It was first published as a children’s picture book by Groundwood Books in 1993. In 2017 the North America Native Museum (NONAM) in Zurich, Switzerland featured the series of images as part of the exhibit, “Stories from the Woodland.” Long before Paper Art became socially acceptable, Yerxa turned layers of fiber and color into layers of memories as he recalled a journey between seasons. The original works, which became two children’s books, took about thirty years to complete. As part of an exhibit NONAM created an animated version of the story which was translated by Margaret Noodin and Michael Zimmerman who then also read the story for the film with help from Fionna Noori.
Leo.Yerxa 
5 weeks ago
Leo Yerxa (1947-2017)
Obituary: Ojibway artist Leo Yerxa bridged gulf between Indigenous and European art
Blair Crawford. Ottawa Citizen. September 18, 2017
leo.yerxa 
5 weeks ago
Seseq on Twitter: "Liquifaksi di Kab Sigi - Palu Selatan. Satelite image frame by frame..."
Liquifaksi di Kab Sigi - Palu Selatan. Satelite image frame by frame...

Seseq
‏@sheque
5 October 2018
indonesia  liquefaction 
5 weeks ago
Details of an item from the British Library Catalogue of Illuminated Manuscripts
Detailed record for Additional 10628
Author John Somer
Title Calendar (ff. 1-10), Kalendarium of John Somer and astronomical texts (ff. 10-34)
Origin England, S.W.
Date c.1383-1384
Language Latin
Script Gothic
Decoration A full-page diagram of Zodiac Man in brown and black (f. 25). A full page diagram of the palm of a hand with symbols in red, blue and brown (f. 34). Circular volvelles (f. 34*). Circular eclipse diagrams in red, brown, blue and yellow (ff. 28-30v). Tables and circular diagrams (ff. 26v, 32) in brown and red. A puzzle initial in red with penwork decoration in brown (f. 10). KL initials in red.
Dimensions in mm 275 x 180 (210/30 x 135/50)

via
https://twitter.com/erik_kwakkel/status/1047260041416511488
volvelles 
6 weeks ago
Karl Lagerfeld makes waves with catwalk beach at Chanel show (Paris)
Lauren Cochrane. The Guardian. 2 October 2018

. . . . .

and this —


This generation may also approve of the brand’s sustainability drive. In a post-show announcement, Chanel said the water used for the scenery would be reprocessed by the Paris sewage system and the sand recycled by the construction industry.
Karl.Lagerfeld  fashion  life.guards  swimming.pools 
6 weeks ago
Violating the Form – Work in Progress
Violating the Form
Rachel Cusk and Alexandra Schwartz
In Conversation
. . . . .

Schwartz: Well, maybe it’s old for a reason. What about the subtleties of character or the subtleties of self-expression, or different personal experience?

Cusk: I think those are shared. I’m not saying they don’t exist. I’m seeing them as more oceanic and as things that you can enter and leave in certain phases of your life that aren’t completely determined by the fact that you’re Jane and this is your life. I’m trying to see experience in a more lateral sense rather than as in this form of character. Which, as I said, I don’t actually think is how living is being done anymore. And it’s one of those ideas that hangs around in novel writing that I don’t really believe anymore.

. . . . .

Schwartz: The end of this book is extraordinary, and it is deeply troubling. It’s almost like being thrust into a storm that has been building and finally you’re under the storm, but it works in a very different way than how endings usually work, which is to resolve something. Instead, it seems to me to open a wound and to propose new problems. What happens is that Faye has finally broken away from all of her interlocutors and is alone on a beach and it seems to be a gay beach—there are only men there. And they are all naked, and she takes off her clothes and goes into the water, and a man approaches the water and stands over her, grinning, and pees at her. And just pees into the water as she’s swimming there. What do I make of this? Why?

Cusk: It has its own reason. I see it as an acceptance of an element of, not violence exactly, but separateness, distinction, and this question of men and women—which as I say I’ve fenced all around it and in the end I sort of had to conclude that whatever women are, they are institutionally disadvantaged. I needed to find not just an image for it, but a sort of feeling about it, a feeling about that victimhood which I could understand, which is so much to do with the production of children, the nurture of children, and the defense of them, which is increasingly a shared world and no one owns any of it—it’s changing all the time. But this, as I say, elemental difference that is sex itself, it’s not violent but it looks like it. So, the ending is really that—it’s crude I suppose, and primitive, and it’s about genitals, bodies, none of which are mentioned very much in any of the other three books, but then suddenly there they are.
rachel.cusk  character  cruelty  writing 
6 weeks ago
HathiTrust Research Center Extends Non-Consumptive Research Tool... | HathiTrust Digital Library
Researchers may now use entire HathiTrust corpus — incl copyrighted items — for non-consumptive research via Research Center text and data mining tools.
raw.material  HathiTrust 
7 weeks ago
You May Be Surprised to Hear That Restoration Hardware Is Doing Great - The New York Times
DOMAINS

You May Be Surprised to Hear That Restoration Hardware Is Doing Great
Restoration Hardware seemed doomed. Now, it’s a vast and booming bricks and mortar empire. What gives?

Penelope Green. NYTimes. September 19, 2018

A version of this article appears in print on Sept. 20, 2018, on Page D1 of the New York edition with the headline: A Home Goods Empire Rises Again.

beautifully written account.
hardware.stores  hardware 
7 weeks ago
A giant crawling brain: the jaw-dropping world of termites | News | The Guardian
At least half of termite studies used to be about how to kill them. But science is discovering their extraordinary usefulness
Lisa Margonelli
The Guardian
18 September 2018

. . . . .

I had stumbled into one of the big questions termites pose, which is, roughly, what is “one” termite? Is it one individual termite? Is it one termite with its symbiotic gut microbes, an entity that can eat wood but cannot reproduce on its own? Or is it a colony, a whole living, breathing structure, occupied by a few million related individuals and a gazillion symbionts who collectively constitute “one”?

The issue of one is profound in every direction, with evolutionary, ecological and existential implications. By the end of that day I had a basic idea that the fewer I saw, the more termites there might be. Where I had thought of landscapes as the product of growth, on that afternoon they inverted to become the opposite: the remainders left behind by the forces of persistent and massive chewing. The sky was no longer the sky, but the blue stuff that is visible after the screening brush and cacti have been eaten away. Termites have made the world by unmaking parts of it. They are the architects of negative space. The engineers of not.

. . . . .

…Termites make the mounds by first piling up dirt and then removing it strategically in the tunnels. Eyeless, they use their antennae to feel for smoothness, and in the big tunnels they remove everything that is rough. They may even hear the tunnel’s shape.

Termites are often compared to architects for the way they build their mounds, but that is misleading because they don’t have plans or a global vision. What they really have is an aesthetic, an innate sense of how things should feel.
termites  entomology  one  mereology  aesthetics  craft  architecture 
8 weeks ago
The Rise of Writing: A Q&A with Deborah Brandt
Blog
The Rise of Writing: A Q&A with Deborah Brandt
May 17, 2018
By Blake Plante, NEH Research Intern

What happens when writing becomes more common than reading? In a time when it is easier than ever for people to publish their sentiments, what kinds of risks do writers face? Millions of Americans now spend much of their working days “with their hands on keyboards and their minds on audiences,” writes Deborah Brandt in her latest book, The Rise of Writing: Redefining Mass Literacy (Cambridge University Press, 2015). Her publication explores the effects of writing as a new and dominating form of mass literacy.

. . . . .

When I began this project I could not imagine how anyone could write more than they read, but over the course of the adult lifespan, that seems to be happening. Writing is crowding out reading. People read to write, of course, and read during writing—but reading now more commonly occurs as part of the act of writing, as part of a production process. That strikes me as a new development in the history of mass literacy.
reading  writing  Deborah.Brandt 
8 weeks ago
A rare interview with Comme des Garçons designer Rei Kawakubo | Fashion | The Guardian
The Fashion autumn/winter 2018
A rare interview with Comme des Garçons designer Rei Kawakubo
High-concept, high-fashion and radical, designer Kawakubo is considered the queen of fashion. Jess Cartner-Morley meets the designer at her headquarters in Paris

by Jess Cartner-Morley, styling, Helen Seamons, photographs, Jason Heatherington

The Guardian. 15 September 2018
Rei.Kawakubo  fashion 
8 weeks ago
What’s in the sweeping copyright bill just passed by the European Parliament | Ars Technica
COPYRIGHT OVERHAUL —
What’s in the sweeping copyright bill just passed by the European Parliament
Legislation now goes to a three-way negotiation within the EU.
Timothy B. Lee. ArsTechnica - 9/12/2018
. . . .
The legislation makes online platforms like Google and Facebook directly liable for content uploaded by their users and mandates greater "cooperation" with copyright holders to police the uploading of infringing works. It also gives news publishers a new, special right to restrict how their stories are featured by news aggregators such as Google News. And it creates a new right for sports teams that could limit the ability of fans to share images and videos online.

Today's vote was not the end of Europe's copyright fight. Under the European Union's convoluted process for approving legislation, the proposal will now become the subject of a three-way negotiation involving the European Parliament, the Council of the Europe Union (representing national governments), and the European Commission (the EU's executive branch). If those three bodies agree to a final directive, then it will be sent to each of the 28 EU member countries (or more likely 27 thanks to Brexit) for implementation in national laws.
copyright 
8 weeks ago
What Termites Can Teach Us | The New Yorker
Annals of Entomology
September 17, 2018 Issue
What Termites Can Teach Us
Roboticists are fascinated by their “swarm intelligence,” biologists by their ability to turn grass into energy. But can humans replicate their achievements?
By Amia Srinivasan

references Lisa Margonelli her “Underbug: An Obsessive Tale of Termites and Technology”
entomology  termites  the.problem.of.the.male 
8 weeks ago
"In English, attention is something we pay. In Spanish, attention is something we lend. In French, attention is something we make. And in Farsi, attention is something we do."
Nyusha on Twitter:
@gole_yaas

In English, attention is something we pay.
In Spanish, attention is something we lend.
In French, attention is something we make.
And in Farsi, attention is something we do.

1:40 AM - 12 Sep 2018

good thread
attention  lexicon 
8 weeks ago
The empty city: New York without New Yorkers – in pictures | Cities | The Guardian
The empty city: New York without New Yorkers – in pictures

Charles Johnstone was given one of the last batches of the toxic chemicals and paper that make cibachrome images. He used it to seek out empty places across New York’s five boroughs

11 September 2018
. . . . .

Charles Johnstone’s portfolio includes Brooklyn Corrugated Iron Fences, Thirty Four Basketball Courts, A Few Empty Pools, Some New York Handball Courts, and New York Storefront Churches, printed in the luminous cibachrome colour process
Charles.Johnstone  photographer  photography 
8 weeks ago
Rustic speech and folk-lore : Wright, Elizabeth Mary, 1863-1958
Rustic speech and folk-lore. Humphrey Milford / OUP, 1913
Elizabeth Mary Wright (1863-1958)

this is UC copy, others available.

opens to chatper 19, Weather lore and farming terms

"When the sky has a <i>cruddled</i> appearance, that is, when it is covered with small fleecy clouds called Hen-scrattins (Sc. n.Cy. Midl.), it means that the weather will be : Neither long wet nor yet long dry. The same is said of the long streaky clouds called Filly-tails (Sc. n.Cy), Mares'-tails (gen. dials.), and Goat's-hair (Nhb.).
Elizabeth.Mary.Wright  Joseph.Wright  weather  dialect 
8 weeks ago
Amazon’s Antitrust Antagonist Has a Breakthrough Idea - The New York Times
Amazon’s Antitrust Antagonist Has a Breakthrough Idea
With a single scholarly article, Lina Khan, 29, has reframed decades of monopoly law.
David Streitfeld. NYTimes. September 7, 2018
antitrust  competition  monopoly.law 
9 weeks ago
Pee and pesticides: Thoreau's Walden Pond in trouble, warn scientists | Books | The Guardian
Pee and pesticides: Thoreau's Walden Pond in trouble, warn scientists
Immortalised for its beauty by Henry David Thoreau, the Massachusetts pond is under threat from increased human activity and climate change according to a new study

Alison Flood. The Guardian. 6 April 2018
swimming  swimming.pools 
9 weeks ago
When the Ship Has Sailed Alan Jacobs on Christian Humanism in an Age of Crisis | The Point Magazine
Robert L. Kehoe III. The Point.

RK: You conclude this unlikely story with a nod to Jacques Ellul, who became one of the leading prophets and critics of the burgeoning technocratic society. Anticipating how problem-solver culture would take hold, Ellul envisioned a future starved of creativity, devoid of spiritual depth and purpose, where “children are educated to become precisely what society expects of them.” Apart from the fact that aspects of his vision seem to have come to life, why was it so important to give Ellul the final word?

AJ: Auden was born in 1907, Weil in 1909, Ellul in 1912. He’s not that much younger than them, but the difference is significant. Also, he lived in occupied France, where Weil wanted to be but couldn’t get to. During the war she was mainly in London, Auden in various parts of America, but Ellul was trying to raise food for his family, preach sermons to his tiny Reformed congregation, and smuggle Jews out of France. This was an existentially threatening time for Ellul, and it happened when he was still a very young man—so the whole war was formative for him in ways it wasn’t for any of my main characters. And perhaps for this reason Ellul saw with remarkable immediacy and clarity that the victory was not that of democracy but rather technocracy. The other five lived through a great struggle for, as they all would have seen it, the soul of the West; but Ellul came into his intellectual maturity when that struggle had been concluded. I thought it important to end with a look at a brilliant thinker who didn’t worry about whether rule of the technocratic elite could be averted, because that rule was already established, and the only question remaining, for thoughtful and serious Christians, was how to live in it.
ayjay  Jacques.Ellul  malta 
9 weeks ago
D. J.s, Swim Briefs, $25 Coladas: In Vegas, the Party’s at the Pool - The New York Times
D. J.s, Swim Briefs, $25 Coladas: In Vegas, the Party’s at the Pool
The city has long been known for its night life. Now, day clubs are the destination of the moment, with nonstop music, tropical cocktails and the inevitable red-velvet ropes. The water can get wild.

Courtney Bond. NYTimes. September 4, 2018

tagged "swimming pools", but not much swimming in evidence.
swimming.pools  las.vegas 
10 weeks ago
Broad strokes: Indonesian art and 20 years of Reformasi
Broad strokes: Indonesian art and 20 years of Reformasi
Erin Cook, the interpreter. 22 May 2018

. . . . .

Nugroho points to extremist groups such as Jamaah Ansharut Daulah, a local affiliate of the Islamic State, as the “real censors”. Attacks such as those this month in Surabaya “create terror, fear, and anxiety”, and in turn give the government more scope to intervene in the name of security.

While that in itself is not unique to Indonesia, the relative newness of the country’s democracy creates pressure. Nugroho says:

[In Indonesia] everyone is still euphoric about being able to speak out, to criticise, or comment. Everyone talks, but it doesn’t mean they are ready for criticism. Everyone closes their ears. They want their own version of truth. We minimise research and data, and express our ego and personal opinions.
indonesia  Eko.Nugroho 
10 weeks ago
Chanel shoes, but no salary: how one woman exposed the scandal of the French fashion industry | Fashion | The Guardian
Chanel shoes, but no salary: how one woman exposed the scandal of the French fashion industry
Fashion industry
A new book by academic Giulia Mensitieri, laying bare the working conditions of stylists and young designers, has sparked controversy. Will it lead to improved conditions for those forced to work for clothes vouchers instead of cash?

Stefanie Marsh. The Guardian. 2 September 2018

Giulia Mensitieri takes little to no personal interest in clothes. So it is likely to have been an ugly surprise to the French fashion industry that her PhD – now a book entitled The Most Beautiful Job in the World – has opened up its secretive profession in such a dramatically public way.
fashion 
10 weeks ago
India sees an ancient textile, produced in colonial-era mills, as a fabric of the future
India sees an ancient textile, produced in colonial-era mills, as a fabric of the future
Shashank Bengali. Los Angeles Times. September 2, 2018

. . . . .

Now India is betting that jute — an ancient textile whose harvesting and production have scarcely been touched by modern technology — could be a fabric of the future.

Amid a global push to reduce the use of plastic for environmental reasons, India is promoting jute — better known in the United States as the fiber used in burlap — as a material for reusable shopping bags, home furnishings, clothing, even diapers and women’s sanitary pads.

Indian officials tout the humble fiber’s eco-friendly qualities. Extracted from the bark of a tall, reedy plant, jute requires less water than cotton and almost no pesticides, absorbs more carbon dioxide for its size than most trees, and is totally biodegradable.

. . . . .

reminded of

http://www.hwpeabody.com/history.html
jute  India 
10 weeks ago
DSNA / education news, Fall 2018
Teaching Lexicography: “Walking Dictionaries,” a University at Buffalo first-year seminar
Walter Hakala and Kerry Collins
DSNA 
10 weeks ago
Extreme Vespas in Indonesia – in pictures | World news | The Guardian
Extreme Vespas in Indonesia – in pictures

Hundreds of Indonesians gather in Java each year to celebrate their love of the world-renowned Italian scooter – and many customise their rides to resemble punk mutants straight out of Mad Max

Darren Whiteside / Reuters
The Guardian
Thu 30 August 2018
indonesia 
10 weeks ago
Franken-algorithms: the deadly consequences of unpredictable code | Technology | The Guardian
Franken-algorithms: the deadly consequences of unpredictable code

The death of a woman hit by a self-driving car highlights an unfolding technological crisis, as code piled on code creates ‘a universe no one fully understands’

Andrew Smith. The Guardian. 30 August 2018

. . . . .

“It’s proceeding on its own, in little bits and pieces,” he says. “What I was obsessed with 20 years ago that has completely taken over the world today are multicellular, metazoan digital organisms, the same way we see in biology, where you have all these pieces of code running on people’s iPhones, and collectively it acts like one multicellular organism.

“There’s this old law called Ashby’s law that says a control system has to be as complex as the system it’s controlling, and we’re running into that at full speed now, with this huge push to build self-driving cars where the software has to have a complete model of everything, and almost by definition we’re not going to understand it.

. . . . . .

“And we will eventually give up writing algorithms altogether,” Walsh continues, “because the machines will be able to do it far better than we ever could. Software engineering is in that sense perhaps a dying profession. It’s going to be taken over by machines that will be far better at doing it than we are.”

Walsh believes this makes it more, not less, important that the public learn about programming, because the more alienated we become from it, the more it seems like magic beyond our ability to affect. When shown the definition of “algorithm” given earlier in this piece, he found it incomplete, commenting: “I would suggest the problem is that algorithm now means any large, complex decision making software system and the larger environment in which it is embedded, which makes them even more unpredictable.” A chilling thought indeed. Accordingly, he believes ethics to be the new frontier in tech, foreseeing “a golden age for philosophy” – a view with which Eugene Spafford of Purdue University, a cybersecurity expert, concurs.

“Where there are choices to be made, that’s where ethics comes in. And we tend to want to have an agency that we can interrogate or blame, which is very difficult to do with an algorithm. This is one of the criticisms of these systems so far, in that it’s not possible to go back and analyze exactly why some decisions are made, because the internal number of choices is so large that how we got to that point may not be something we can ever recreate to prove culpability beyond doubt.”
algorithms  code  w.ross.ashby 
10 weeks ago
This new company is on a mission to help you grow better fruit in your backyard
This new company is on a mission to help you grow better fruit in your backyard

Gillian Ferguson. Los Angeles Times. August 24, 2018

. . . . .

…Fruitstitute, a four-month-old start-up dedicated to solving a common L.A. problem: how to care for your backyard fruit trees. The business model is part educational resource and part tree service, with the lofty goal of making every Angeleno fruit-tree literate.
los.angeles  trees 
11 weeks ago
Can Chinese Write Their Own Language? | ASIAN BOSS - YouTube
Can Chinese Write Their Own Language? | ASIAN BOSS
July 19, 2018
chinese  handwriting 
12 weeks ago
Child drownings in Germany linked to parents' phone ‘fixation’ | World news | The Guardian
Child drownings in Germany linked to parents' phone ‘fixation’
Lifeguards warn parents to put phones away, after more than 300 people drowned this year
Kate Connolly. The Guardian. 15 August 2018
swimming  swimming.pools  drowning 
august 2018
She Chronicled the Great Photographers of the 20th Century. Then, She Stopped Taking Portraits.
She Chronicled the Great Photographers of the 20th Century. Then, She Stopped Taking Portraits.
A lost photo shoot illuminates the roots of Lynn Davis, who is, along with Peter Hujar and Robert Mapplethorpe, one of the masters of black-and-white portraiture.

M. H. Miller. NYTimes / T Magazine. August 10, 2018
Lynn.Davis  photographer  portraits 
august 2018
Lisa Robertson : Proverbs of a she-dandy - e-artexte
Robertson, Lisa. Lisa Robertson : Proverbs of a she-dandy. Vancouver, BC: Morris and Helen Belkin Art Gallery, University of British Columbia, 2018.
lisa.robertson 
august 2018
Vs. Religion vs. Science - Theos Think Tank - Understanding faith. Enriching society.
Nick Spencer reviews ‘Religion vs. Science: What religious people really think’ by Elaine Howard Ecklund and Christopher P. Scheitle.

Theos. 25 July 2018

. . . . .

Ecklund and Scheitle’s most valuable contribution is to offer an analysis of where and why the line between these two extremes can be drawn. They suggest that there are two key pinch points, so to speak: areas where the tectonic plates of science and religion meet, rub, and generate dangerously destructive tension. The first of these is around the question of “what does science mean for the existence and activity of God?” and the second is “what does science mean for the sacredness of the human?”
orientations.towards.science 
august 2018
Disturbances #16: The Price of Perfection
on the iPhone glass screen.
and dust.
the use of dust to create the iPhone (deposition etc), and the generation of dust in its manufacture, and destruction.
the price of perfection.
iPhone  dust  glass  fragility  hautepop  capitalism 
august 2018
Opinion | Anti-Vaccine Activists Have Taken Vaccine Science Hostage
Melinda Wenner Boyer. NYTimes. August 4, 2018

.. . . . .

“Scientists’ perception of public irrationality is having an impact on our ability to rationally discuss things that deserve discussion,” says Andrew Read, the director of the Center for Infectious Disease Dynamics at Pennsylvania State University. Dr. Read studies how pathogens evolve in response to vaccines, and he is fiercely pro-vaccine — his goal is to keep the shots effective. He says he has had unpleasant encounters at scientific conferences; colleagues have warned him, for instance, not to talk too openly about his work. “I have felt the pressure — and for that matter the responsibility — acutely,” he says.
orientations.towards.science  vaccines 
august 2018
Denialism: what drives people to reject the truth | News | The Guardian
The long read
Denialism: what drives people to reject the truth

From vaccines to climate change to genocide, a new age of denialism is upon us. Why have we failed to understand it?

Keith Kahn-Harris
The Guardian
3 August 2018
denialism  orientations.towards.science 
august 2018
Terry Riley review – father and son deliver gleefully chaotic minimalism | Music | The Guardian
Terry Riley review – father and son deliver gleefully chaotic minimalism
Oval Space, London
The composer, aided by guitarist son Gyan, sounds like Bach doing bebop during this series of joyously ramshackle improvisations

John Lewis. The Guardian. 31 July 2018

wish I'd been there.
Terry.Riley 
august 2018
The billionaire who bought the LA Times: 'Hipsters will want paper soon' | Media | The Guardian
Interview
The billionaire who bought the LA Times: 'Hipsters will want paper soon'
Rory Carroll. The Guardian. 21 July 2018

. . . . . .

He intends to keep printing. As a boy in Port Elizabeth he delivered newspapers and fell in love with printing presses and the tactile, inky experience of reading on paper, which he considers an antidote to shortened attention spans. “Hieroglyphics started, I don’t think it’s going to end. I’m determined that printing, that paper, must continue to exist.”

Print generated lucrative advertising revenue. And it may come back into fashion. “Kids today want to buy vinyl records. So you’ll have hipster kids wanting to see paper soon,” he said, a half-joke. “I don’t think touching paper and reading will actually go away. There will be a need for leisurely reading and the tactile feel.”

There is also urgent need to tackle blinkered partisanship by providing balancing viewpoints on op-ed pages…
los.angeles  LAT 
july 2018
Carr Fire: Future of climate change is here | The Sacramento Bee
EDITORIALS
The Carr Fire is a terrifying glimpse into California’s future
By the Sacramento Bee Editorial Board
July 27, 2018
california 
july 2018
Effects of Traffic Noise on the Social Behavior of Tufted Titmice
Owens, Jessica Lynn, "Effects of Traffic Noise on the Social Behavior of Tufted Titmice (Baeolophus bicolor).. " PhD diss., University of Tennessee, 2013.
http://trace.tennessee.edu/utk_graddiss/1767

. . . . .

Having received a D in the third semester of my 6th grade science class, I never thought I would be here ...... Dating back to the 13th century, the word noise was adapted from the Latin word nausea and is ...... structure of Australian birdsong?

ABSTRACT
The presence of traffic noise and its potential effects on wildlife is a burgeoning topic of research within the fields of conservation behavior, animal behavior, ecology and wildlife management. Accumulated data from these efforts, mostly correlative and rarely experimental, suggest that traffic noise induces a myriad of species-specific changes to population dynamics, breeding behavior and acoustic structure of avian song. However, the degree of generalizability of these findings is confounded by the limited variety of behaviors studied within a relatively small sample of species. This original research provides experimental evidence of the effects of simulated and real traffic noise on previously unstudied social and vocal behavior in tufted titmice (Baeolophus bicolor). First, titmice were exposed to simulated traffic noise for 8 hours per day to determine whether traffic noise caused changes in social and vocal behavior as had been suggested by previous research. This stimulus, background noise mimicking the duration of exposure, amplitude and frequency parameters of traffic noise, significantly affected several aspects of social behavior. Analyses on the vocal behavior of these subjects suggest that noise only affects call use of the most vocally-productive bird, who also happens to be the most dominant group member. A second study broadcasted recordings of traffic noise to titmice for 2.5 hours per day to test for the effects of the temporary rise in background noise levels resulting from 'rush hour' on the same social behavior found to be affected in study one. Results of Study 2 corroborated those of Study 1 and indicated that characteristics of traffic noise itself influence its effects. Among the first of its kind, this research demonstrates a direct link between traffic noise and survival-relevant social and vocal behavior.

. . . . .

p4 :
But what is noise? Noise (Table I) is a subjectively-defined category of sound. Dating back to the 13th century, the word noise was adapted from the Latin word nausea and is currently defined as an unwanted or intrusive sound, or one that interferes with the reception of another sound (Dooling & Popper, 2007; "Noise," n.d.). Although noise and sound describe the same acoustic phenomena, they represent significantly different subjective categories of the phenomenon.
birdsong  noise  birds 
july 2018
‘Even monks get impatient’: Buddhist priest sorry for anger at tourist reviews | World news | The Guardian
‘Even monks get impatient’: Buddhist priest sorry for anger at tourist reviews
Daniel Kimura hit the news this week with his withering comebacks to tourists complaining that food at a temple guesthouse was not up to scratch

Daniel Hurst. The Guardian. 27 July 2018
japan 
july 2018
The Czech Painter Often Credited with Inventing Pure Abstract Art
The Czech Painter Often Credited with Inventing Pure Abstract Art
Looking at František Kupka we see an intense channeling of occult vibrations and shimmering realities that asks viewers if they too have experienced their life this way.

Joseph Nechvatal. July 23, 2018
František.Kupka  abstraction 
july 2018
BBC - Travel - From Africa to tea with the Queen
Africa
Road Trips

From Africa to tea with the Queen
Eighty-year-old Julia Albu drove through Africa, breezing her way through notorious borders and military blockades by saying she was going to London to have tea with the Queen.

Melissa Twigg. BBC. 19 July 2018
africa 
july 2018
U.K. Supermarket to Have ‘Quieter Hour’ for People With Autism
Ceylan Yeginsu. NYTimes. July 19, 2018

LONDON — Dim the lights. Silence the piped-in music. Turn down the checkout beeps. For an hour on Saturdays, a British supermarket chain is introducing a weekly “quieter hour” aimed at helping people with autism have a better shopping experience by easing sensory overload.

The move by the supermarket, Morrisons, which begins on Saturday and runs from 9 a.m. to 10 a.m., has been welcomed by the National Autistic Society, which says that even small changes can make a big difference in the lives of people with autism and their families.
autism  quiet  retail 
july 2018
'Monumental' undertaking: Workers finally tame an epic landslide that reshaped the coast and blocked Highway 1
'Monumental' undertaking: Workers finally tame an epic landslide that reshaped the coast and blocked Highway 1

Thomas Curwen. The Los Angeles Times. July 19, 2018
california  engineering 
july 2018
Opinion | The Lesson of the Château de Calberte
Opinion
The Lesson of the Château de Calberte

Michael Goldfarb. NYTimes. July 19, 2018

. . . . .

He explained that when he and Ms. Darnas had first seen the place the walls had long since caved in on themselves. The couple pulled the stones out and eventually solved the jigsaw puzzle of how they had originally been assembled. He pointed to the different layers of stone just above our heads. The first layers were flat and had been cut by masons in such a way that they fit together effortlessly with very little mortar. He asked me to look a little higher. The stones were smaller and more haphazardly arranged.

His theory was the workmen who initially built the chateau had very advanced masonry skills. But over the centuries, as the region suffered war, plague and economic collapse, those skills had been lost. The last workmen who expanded the chateau simply didn’t know the advanced stonecutting techniques.
progress 
july 2018
Community Plumbing: A History of the Hardware Store
Shannon Mattern
Community Plumbing
How the hardware store orders things, neighborhoods, and material worlds.
July 2018
hardware  hardware.stores 
july 2018
Jason Fagone / Elizabeth Wayland Barber on the Friedmans
Jason Fagone on Twitter: "I’ve been thinking about Barber’s story all week. It says so much about the Friedmans: how they lived, what they valued and found joy in, what they regretted. And their profound influence on others.… https://t.co/tgzfJOw1IV

great story about William Friedman, and about the author's own experience as female scholar.
William.Friedman  Elizabeth.Wayland.Barber 
july 2018
What Babies Know About Their Bodies and Themselves
THE CHECKUP
What Babies Know About Their Bodies and Themselves
How infants’ brains respond to touch may indicate their understanding of their bodies, researchers say.

Perri Klass, M.D. NYTimes. July 9, 2018

. . . . .

For young babies, Dr. Meltzoff added, “touch tells them about themselves when they’re in the bassinet alone, touching their face, shaking their hands.” When they’re kicking their feet, or opening and closing their hands, he said, and those associated brain regions are active, you could think of it as a kind of “body babbling.”
cognition  brain  touch  body.babbling 
july 2018
(9) 映画『お父さんと伊藤さん』予告編
My Dad and Mr. Ito (Yuki Tanada, director; 2016)
nice hardware store scene — a turning point in the film — at 0:37.

father doesn't approve of his daughter's life (she works in a convenience store) nor of her boyfriend (works in same place). (later, she's working in a bookstore.)
begins to see the good in Mr. Ito (who tends the garden in their small apartment yard), and this hardware store scene, where the two guys delight in the nuts and bolts section, is turning point in the film.
hardware  Tanada.Yuki  hardware.film 
july 2018
Are the religious suspicious of science? Investigating religiosity, religious context, and orientations towards science - Esther Chan, 2018
Are the religious suspicious of science? Investigating religiosity, religious context, and orientations towards science
Esther Chan
First Published June 6, 2018 Research Article
Article information
Article has an altmetric score of 5 No Access
Abstract
Are the religious suspicious of science? Drawing on data from 52 nations in the World Values Survey (wave 6) (N = 58,474), I utilize multilevel models to examine the relationship between religiosity, religious context, and five different orientations towards science: confidence in science, trust in scientific authority under conditions of conflict with religion, faith in science, views on the moral effects of science, and interest in scientific knowledge. Results show that while religiosity is on average negatively associated with the five outcomes, the relationship between religiosity and orientations towards science varies by country such that religiosity is sometimes positively associated with the different outcomes. Religiosity is only consistently negatively associated with trust in scientific authority in all countries and with all orientations towards science in western countries. Finally, differences in orientations towards science also exist across country religious contexts, with countries dominated by the unaffiliated having more positive orientations towards science.

Keywords public understanding of science, science and religion, science attitudes and perceptions
science  religion  religiosity  orientations.towards.science 
july 2018
'Colour was too sweet for apartheid': the austere genius of David Goldblatt | Art and design | The Guardian
'Colour was too sweet for apartheid': the austere genius of David Goldblatt
The South African photographer, who died this week, caught apartheid’s grotesqueness without ever letting anger take over. His portrait of a place and a time is without equal in modern photography

Sean O'Hagan. The Guardian / Photography. 26 June 2018
ZA  David.Goldblatt 
june 2018
Rachel Cusk on the reaction of women to her book A Life's Work | Books | The Guardian
I was only being honest
When author Rachel Cusk wrote A Life's Work, her disarmingly frank account of motherhood, she was shocked by the vicious reaction it provoked from other women. The experience forced her to question herself as a writer and a parent, as she records here

Rachel Cusk. The Guardian. 21 March 2008
rachel.cusk 
june 2018
Review: A Life's Work: On Becoming a Mother by Rachel Cusk
Kate Kellaway. The Guardian. 9 September 2001



She knows exactly when claustrophobia may become too much - and she reaches then for the steady help of writers: Edith Wharton, Tolstoy, Olivia Manning, Coleridge. She writes beautifully about them and about herself. Words are her way of staying adult, separate, fluently mutinous. She also subjects childcare manuals - Penelope Leach, Doctor Spock et al - to satirical scrutiny; her book should be read alongside them because her writing is such an antidote to their bland, knowing prose. She writes about not knowing, about the mother as a lost soul. Hers is a book of doubts.

One of the implied doubts is about the subject itself. Being a mother and writing about it are a contradiction in terms. As a mother you are meant to be secondary, selfless - not to take, as Cusk bravely does, centre stage. Her partner spots the nice irony, joking to friends that they are moving to the country where he will look after the children while Rachel writes a book about looking after the children.

Cusk emerges as someone for whom resistance is second nature. She dislikes groups and yet pines for a community of feeling. A friend tells her 'quite firmly' that she must not forget 'all the good things' about being a mother. I felt 'the good thing' we missed was the baby herself. Cusk protectively under-exposes her. She is at the heart of the book and outside it.
rachel.cusk 
june 2018
In and Out of Sight
Artists Who Lose Their Vision, Then See Clearly

Eight artists found new ways to see after learning they had macular degeneration. “Nothing to lose is a kind of new freedom,” says one of them.

Serena Solomon. NYTimes / Arts. June 19-20, 2018
A version of this article appears in print on June 20, 2018, on Page C1 of the New York edition with the headline: In and Out of Sight.

. . . .

"Mr. Hollerbach painted throughout every aspect of his vision loss caused by macular degeneration, a disease that affects 10 million Americans, often in their twilight years — typically depleting their central vision and leaving most legally blind, but with some remnant of sight.
Can they stay creative?"

strange use of the word "creative".
macular.degeneration  blind  paint 
june 2018
They Started School Afraid of the Water. Now They Are Saving Lives.
They Started School Afraid of the Water. Now They Are Saving Lives.
Corey Kilgannon. NYTimes. June 18, 2018

June 19, 2018, on Page A18 of the New York edition with the headline:
A High School With Lessons In Swimming, And Striving.
swimming  swimming.pools 
june 2018
It’s Last Call at Ports O’Call ~ Scenes From the Final Days at L.A.’s Waterfront Village ~ L.A. TACO
It’s Last Call at Ports O’Call ~ Scenes From the Final Days at L.A.’s Waterfront Village ~ L.A. TACO
Erick Galindo. L.A. Taco. June 18, 2018

“We’re basically going to keep coming to work until we see the padlock and the notice from the sheriff on the door,” Caldera laughed.

His colleagues all added their own version of the end, laughing as a small yacht sped off in the distance.
los.angeles  san.pedro 
june 2018
The Strange Case of the Missing Joyce Scholar / In Search of the Perfect ‘Ulysses’
The Strange Case of the Missing Joyce Scholar
Two decades ago, a renowned professor promised to produce a flawless version of one of the 20th century’s most celebrated novels: “Ulysses.” Then he disappeared.
John Kidd

Jack Hitt. NYTimes Magazine. June 12/17, 2018

. . . . .

“As much as humanly possible, the 19th-century dictionary of English is in here,” he told me. His translation is titled “Isaura Unbound,” and he wanted me to understand its ambition: When the book is finished, it will be a complete reordering of one entire English dictionary into a single work of art.
John.Kidd  James.Joyce  dictionaries  lexicon 
june 2018
LES INROCKUPTIBLES - antennae / Why are contemporary artists obsessed with animals?
SPECIAL INTERVIEW
Why are contemporary artists obsessed with animals?
Les Inrockuptibles' Julie Ackerman talks with Giovanni Aloi

via Steve Baker

. . . . . . . . .

"Personally, I don’t care anymore about what Heidegger thought
of lizards, Agamben of spiders, and Deleuze of wolves, as they all knew very little about these animals. Most often than not, in their work, animals become abstracted and generalized pictures of inferiority."
animals  animal.art  Giovanni.Aloi 
june 2018
I can't bear people who swim too fast in the slow lane | Coco Khan | Life and style | The Guardian
I can't bear people who swim too fast in the slow lane
Mark my words, there will be an entire circle of hell dedicated to them

Coco Khan. The Guardian. Life and Style / Adult Learner. 8 June 2018

. . . . .

range of comments.
swimming  swimming.pools 
june 2018
Hardware store tent :: Security Pacific National Bank Photo Collection
Order Number 00007271
Title Hardware store tent
Collection/Location Security Pacific National Bank Collection
Shops and stores-Hardware.
Physical Description 1 photograph :b&w
Description Three men stand at the front of the tent which contains shovels and pails. Beside it is the sign for Colman & Thompson Hardware.
Subject Colman & Thompson Hardware.
Hardware stores.
hardware.stores  los.angeles 
june 2018
Artificial intelligence pioneer says we need to start over - Axios
Artificial intelligence pioneer says we need to start over
Steve LeVine. September 15, 2017?

. . . . .

But Hinton said that, to push materially ahead, entirely new methods will probably have to be invented. "Max Planck said, 'Science progresses one funeral at a time.' The future depends on some graduate student who is deeply suspicious of everything I have said."
aphorisms  Max.Planck  Geoffrey.Hinton 
june 2018
The Secret Language of Ships | Hakai Magazine
The Secret Language of Ships
Signs and symbols on the sides of ships tell stories about an industry few outsiders understand.
Authored by Text by Erin Van Rheenen
Photos by David Webster Smith

IMO, load lines, Samuel Plimsoll
nautical 
june 2018
other, imminent | sixpenceee: Julie Gautier, French deep-sea...
Julie Gautier, French deep-sea diver, dancer, and filmmaker, performs an underwater dance in the worlds most deepest [sic] pool in Venice, Italy.
Julie.Gautier  swimming  swimming.pools  dance  whew 
june 2018
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