ap + space   14

Overview effect
A cognitive shift in awareness reported by some astronauts and cosmonauts during spaceflight, often while viewing the Earth from orbit or from the lunar surface. It refers to the experience of seeing firsthand the reality of the Earth in space, which is immediately understood to be a tiny, fragile ball of life, hanging in the void, shielded and nourished by a paper-thin atmosphere. […] Third-hand observers of these individuals may also report a noticeable difference in attitude. Astronauts Rusty Schweikart, Edgar Mitchell, Tom Jones, Chris Hadfield and Mike Massimino are all reported to have experienced the effect.
:wikipedia  psychology  space 
june 2013 by ap
The Moons of the Solar System | Visual News
[The design was inspired by old science ads with a touch of modern graphic elements.]
:picture  astronomy  space  visualisation  ! 
december 2012 by ap
The Mars Landing Approach: Getting Large Payloads to the Surface of the Red Planet
“There’s too much atmosphere on Mars to land heavy vehicles like we do on the moon, using propulsive technology completely,” said Manning, “and there’s too little atmosphere [and too much gravity] to land like we do on Earth [using atmospheric drag and lift].” […] Plainly put, with our current capabilities, a large, heavy vehicle, streaking through Mars’ thin, volatile atmosphere only has about 90 seconds to slow from Mach 5 to under Mach 1, change and re-orient itself from a being a spacecraft to a lander, deploy parachutes to slow down further, then use thrusters to translate to the landing site and finally, gently touch down.
space  engineering  ! 
september 2012 by ap
Earth: Time Lapse View from Space, Fly Over (NASA, ISS) | Vimeo
Time lapse sequences of photographs taken by Ron Garan, Satoshi Furukawa and the crew of expeditions 28 & 29 onboard the International Space Station from August to October, 2011, who to my knowledge shot these pictures at an altitude of around 350 km. All credit goes to them.
space  :video  ! 
november 2011 by ap
Big Brothers | Michael Paukner @ Flickr
What’s up there? How many countries have stuck satellites up into space, how many of those satellites are working, part-working or just bits of junk? This graphic may help to enlighten you. […] source: UCS Satellite Database + The Satellite Encyclopedia
space  politics  visualisation  :picture  ! 
september 2010 by ap
Solar Neighborhood
Because the present diagram focuses on exoplanetary systems and bright "landmark" stars (those most visible from the greatest distances), it is misleading. We should picture this region with a heavy peppering of dim red stars, along with hundreds more of the yellowish and orange stars that furnish the best candidates for planetary hosts. Such detail, unfortunately, would make a small-format diagram indecipherable.
astronomy  space  visualisation  beauty  ! 
may 2010 by ap
A hard rain's gonna fall on exoplanet COROT-7b
COROT-7b has a similar density and silicate rock makeup to that of Earth. However, the planet and its host star are separated by only 1.6 million miles […] One side of COROT-7b […] is thought to have a temperature of 4220°F [2330°C]. ¶ As rocks vaporize at that heat it is believed that COROT-7b’s precipitation is pebbly. But when a “front moves in” pebbles condense out of the air and run into lakes of molten lava on the surface below. Scientists used a computer system that ran different variants yet yielded consistent results – rock showers. ¶ Much like the Earth’s atmosphere causes water cloud to form resulting in water droplets, COROT-7b’s atmosphere is believed to form rock clouds that then rain little pebbles and other forms of rock.
astronomy  space  recommended  ! 
october 2009 by ap
A New Take on Warping Spacetime | Paul Gilster
Can we learn how to generate a region of expanding spacetime and one of contracting spacetime? Obousy and Cleaver argue that nature can offer insights, for spacetime itself is already expanding
space  engineering  science  ! 
july 2008 by ap
Antimatter For Deep Space Propulsion | Paul Gilster
Antimatter Catalyzed Microfission/Fusion [is] stingy with the antimatter, requiring only nanogram quantities. [… At] the microgram level […] we can envision a 100-ton payload on a one-year round-trip mission to Jupiter.
physics  space  engineering  ! 
december 2007 by ap
The Mars Landing Approach: Getting Large Payloads to the Surface of the Red Planet | Universe Today
Plainly put, with our current capabilities, a large, heavy vehicle, streaking through Mars’ thin, volatile atmosphere only has about ninety seconds to slow from Mach 5 to under Mach 1, change and re-orient itself from a being a spacecraft to a lander, deploy parachutes to slow down further, then use thrusters to translate to the landing site and finally, gently touch down.
space  engineering  ! 
july 2007 by ap
“Visitable” Planets | Greg Laughlin
My attitude toward Venus was transformed by David Grinspoon’s _Venus Revealed_ […] By contrast there’s *no* place on Mars that could be explored using gear from an Army Surplus store.
space  future  inspirational  ! 
june 2007 by ap
Electric Sail Rides the Solar Wind | Paul Gilster
All told, the electric sail points toward faster transport within the Solar System. [It] can generate speeds up to 100 km/s, which would get a probe to Pluto in less than four years and into the nearby interstellar medium in fifteen.
astronomy  space  engineering  ! 
april 2007 by ap
Spacecraft escaping the Solar System
This page shows the current positions and other interesting data of the four spacecraft which are leaving the Solar System on escape trajectories - our first emissaries to the stars. The graphics and data […] always represent the latest positions.
astronomy  space 
october 2005 by ap

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