allaboutgeorge + speech   19

How Philosopher Paul Virilio (1932-2018) Spoke to an Age of Acceleration and Total War | Frieze
Modernity is war on ever increasing scales: expanding from the tactical to the strategic to the logistic. World War II was won not by generals but by quartermasters, by the ones who kept the biggest flows of boots and bullets and bodies moving toward the front.

Modernity is also war on more and more kinds of terrain. Warfare not only took to the air but to the airwaves. The modern world is a condition of generalized information warfare. Not only is architecture vulnerable to bombs, it proves defenseless against information, passing through the doors and walls of our homes, rearranging the space and time we imagine we live within.
war  information  philosophy  speech  theory  writing  nonfiction  wwii  terrorism  terror 
11 weeks ago by allaboutgeorge
BBC - Travel - Why no-one speaks Indonesia's language
Bahasa Indonesia was adopted to make communication easier across the vast Indonesian archipelago, but its simplicity has only created new barriers.
indonesia  language  identity  speech  trade  economy  asia 
july 2018 by allaboutgeorge
I Wish I Had Videos of My Dad's Accent - Father's Day Essay
The last remaining evidence of my father's voice, the final thing that roots him and his existence in my brain, will eventually cease to exist–just like VHS tapes, and the accent he spoke with, and my memories of him, too.
language  speech  parenting  memory  technology  culture  curation  family  english 
june 2017 by allaboutgeorge
Anatomy of a Fake Quotation - Megan McArdle - National - The Atlantic
We become invested in these quotes because they say something important about us--and they let us feel that those emotions were shared by great figures in history.  We naturally search for reasons that they could have said it--that they could have felt like us--rather than looking for reasons to disbelieve. If we'd put the same moving words in Hitler's mouth, everyone would have been a lot more skeptical.  But while this might be a lesson about the need to be skeptical, I don't think there's anything stupid about wanting to be more like Dr. King.
quotes  speech  online  journalism  media  twitter  facebook  social  reputation 
may 2011 by allaboutgeorge
Ni Hao's Your Chinese? - James Fallows - International - The Atlantic
Linguistically, things in other foreign languages that are easy to forget in seven months, like verb conjugations or noun declensions, are just not an issue in Chinese. The grammar lacks the baggage of endings in Romance and Germanic languages, and certainly Russian and Japanese that can go in one ear and out the other of language learners. I am grateful every day for the lightness, by contrast, of throwing out a string of simple Chinese words, one after the other, and not really caring if they're nouns, verbs, or adjectives because they can often be all of the above!

I know, I know, there are some other constraints and some regulated word order, but by comparison with most other languages, Mandarin grammar is easy. And the Chinese somehow grasp the gist behind clumsy word order, and quickly rearrange my words for me, like tiles in a game of anagrams.
language  china  asia  education  learning  speech  attention 
february 2011 by allaboutgeorge
Music mimics the emotion of speech - Telegraph
"There is a strong biological basis to the aesthetics of sound," he said
"Humans prefer tone combinations that are similar to those found in speech."
speech  sound  words  language  beauty  music  research  science  uk 
december 2009 by allaboutgeorge
Hello, Sweet Prince - Jude Law Brings His Hamlet to Broadway - NYTimes.com
“When you’re faced with ‘To be or not to be,’ in the first rehearsal,” Mr. Law said, “there’s a sense of ‘Oh, God, I’m stepping into the world’s greatest cliché.’ But without sounding like a naff old actor, I’m Hamlet, and what a great way to question life and death.” He added: “The reason they’re so famous is because they’re beautifully written and incredibly powerful pieces of dialogue. Never underestimate the power of these lines. Our language is littered with words and phrases from this play, and we use them because we have not, in 400 years, found a better way of putting things.”
acting  shakespeare  denmark  speech  writing  creativity  language  broadway 
september 2009 by allaboutgeorge
Op-Ed Columnist - Secrets of a Pollster - NYTimes.com
The über-lesson for presidents? You can’t be too honest in describing big problems, too bold in offering big solutions, too humble in dealing with big missteps, too forward in re-telling your story or too gutsy in speaking the previously unspeakable.
president  politics  leadership  identity  speech  rhetoric  story 
march 2009 by allaboutgeorge
Michael Nyman: I spy with my musical eye - Times Online
"Again, I had one of those eureka moments that I have as a film-maker but don't necessarily have as a composer. I thought what we should do is to remove the speech - remove my answer to the questions, because I don't like the sound of my own voice and I'm fed up giving the same answers to the same old questions year in year out - and the hesitation would trigger a piece of music."
film  uk  classical  classicalmusic  creativity  music  cinema  art  speech 
january 2009 by allaboutgeorge
Movie Review - 'Milk' - Freedom Fighter in Life Becomes Potent Symbol in Death - NYTimes.com
[...] “My name is Harvey Milk, and I want to recruit you.” That was an opening line that the real Milk often used in his speeches to break the tension with straight audiences, but the film shows him deploying it with mostly gay crowds as well, with a slightly different inflection. He wants to recruit them into the politics of democracy, to persuade them that the stigma and discrimination they are used to enduring quietly and even guiltily can be addressed by voting, by demonstrating, by claiming the share of power that is every citizen’s birthright and responsibility. [...]
gay  politics  sanfrancisco  1970s  bayarea  reviews  film  cinema  movies  government  voting  power  speech  identity 
november 2008 by allaboutgeorge
Powells.com Interviews - Iain Banks
"[...] Presented with something like English, you're almost derelict in your duties if you don't have fun with it, because there's so much fun to be had. You shouldn't just think, 'This is my way of getting information across to you.' No. You should have fun with it. If the writer's having fun, unless you're being hopelessly self-serving, I think you can please other people at the same time, if you do it right. [...]"
english  language  beauty  speech  writing  fiction  creativity  uk  books  interviews 
october 2008 by allaboutgeorge
BBC NEWS | UK | Magazine | The man who reads dictionaries
"I'm not against big words per se or fancy or obscure words, obviously I love them, but I'm opposed to using them for their own sake. If words are to form a communication, you use them as a tool to communicate to people and it's pointless to intentionally use a word that no-one else knows."
words  english  language  uk  writing  speech  communication 
october 2008 by allaboutgeorge
David Foster Wallace - Commencement Speech at Kenyon University (2005)
"It is unimaginably hard to do this, to stay conscious and alive in the adult world day in and day out. Which means yet another grand cliché turns out to be true: your education really IS the job of a lifetime. And it commences: now. I wish you way more than luck."
speech  writing  education  toread 
september 2008 by allaboutgeorge
Why McCain can't stop saying "my friends." - By Paul Collins - Slate Magazine
"Among the wide ranks of modern presidential 'my frienders'—let us call them MF'ers for short—only Jimmy Carter and 'Silent Cal' Coolidge appear to have been determined to avoid the term. For Democrats and Republicans alike, it seems, a president who isn't a little bit of an MF'er is a once-in-a-century event."
president  language  usa  history  friendship  speech  rhetoric  democrats  republicans  mccain  politics 
september 2008 by allaboutgeorge
Sex and the semicolon - The Boston Globe
"Sexist language aside, though, the semicolon debate is a model of the way we should approach most disagreements about usage issues: as matters of taste, not law. The interesting questions, after all, aren't about using its and it's; they're the ones that have, yes, nuance and complexity."
grammar  language  english  beauty  sex  aesthetics  copyediting  editing  speech  writing 
august 2008 by allaboutgeorge
Jeanette Winterson - Journalism - The Times : Books - Kids need two languages and a musical instrument
"It may well be that [...] best antidote is not a book and a bedroom, but learning a story and learning to tell it – learning a funny poem, re-finding the out- of- fashion skills of rhetoric and challenge."
children  parenting  story  speech  language  music  education  learning  books  creativity  uk 
march 2008 by allaboutgeorge
Why booze and cigarettes are essential for good journalism. - By Jack Shafer - Slate Magazine
"The wise editor understands that quality journalism requires a bad attitude, foul words, a brawl, and sometimes a drink afterward."
alcohol  drinking  journalism  media  newspapers  writing  identity  beverages  speech  philosophy  editing 
january 2008 by allaboutgeorge

Copy this bookmark:



description:


tags: