allaboutgeorge + research   164

Devah Pager, Who Documented Race Bias in Job Market, Dies at 46 - The New York Times
Her husband said she loved to ride bikes, sing and dance and frequently organized karaoke nights. Her signature song was the anthem popularized by Gloria Gaynor: “I Will Survive.”
obituaries  research  jobs  academia  karaoke 
12 days ago by allaboutgeorge
Paris Review - Robert Caro, The Art of Biography No. 5
I can't start writing a book until I've thought it through and can see it whole in my mind. So before I start writing, I boil the book down to three paragraphs, or two or one—that's when it comes into view. That process might take weeks. And then I turn those paragraphs into an outline of the whole book. That's what you see up here on my wall now—twenty-seven typewritten pages. That's the fifth volume. Then, with the whole book in mind, I go chapter by chapter. I sit down at the typewriter and type an outline of that chapter, let's say if it's a long chapter, seven pages—it's really the chapter in brief, without any of the supporting evidence. Then, each chapter gets a notebook, which I fill with all the materials I want to use—quotations and facts pulled from all of the research I’ve done.
research  history  interview  biography  books  writing  journalism  authors 
12 weeks ago by allaboutgeorge
NYTimes: Facebook Fueled Anti-Refugee Attacks in Germany, New Research Suggests
Their reams of data converged on a breathtaking statistic: Wherever per-person Facebook use rose to one standard deviation above the national average, attacks on refugees increased by about 50 percent.

Nationwide, the researchers estimated in an interview, this effect drove one-tenth of all anti-refugee violence.

The uptick in violence did not correlate with general web use or other related factors; this was not about the internet as an open platform for mobilization or communication. It was particular to Facebook.
socialnetworking  socialmedia  facebook  immigration  news  journalism  web  community  communication  identity  research 
august 2018 by allaboutgeorge
You have less friends as you get older, and you spend more time alone, according to the data — Quartz
Hours spent in the company of children, friends, and extended family members all plateau by our mid-50s. And from the age of 40 until death, we spend an ever-increasing amount of time alone.
age  life  aging  science  research  health  friendship  relationships  marriage 
june 2017 by allaboutgeorge
Did Obama Win Because He Addressed White Americans as Individuals? - Atlantic Mobile
"Independence was more motivating," she said. "...Instead of saying something like, 'We're responsible for one another so we must do x behavior' -- do more gun control, recycle more -- it might be better to say, 'You can make this better for all Americans' ... really emphasizing their individual agency."
usa  politics  power  research  democracy  communication  race  asianamerican  white 
march 2013 by allaboutgeorge
New research details how journalists verify information | Poynter.
“[T]he aspiration to vet the news is an essential goal of most journalists, but … the processes for living up to that goal are not well-defined and not rigorous enough. And for journalism to survive, much more needs to be done to give the process of verification more throw weight.”
media  journalism  data  nonfiction  reputation  information  research 
february 2013 by allaboutgeorge
The Weird Thing About Facebook: Status Updates Are The Most Memorable Writing You Do | Co.Create: Creativity Culture Commerce
Facebook posts, as well as Twitter posts, are so memorable because they are what Mickes calls “mind ready": unedited and unfiltered. They’re off-the-cuff remarks and thoughts. These words, which flow quickly and easily from your friend’s mind onto his Facebook page, are then absorbed by you with similar ease. But is it really true that to make people remember what you write, you should simply spew?
facebook  research  socialmedia  twitter  writing  memory  language  blogging 
february 2013 by allaboutgeorge
Aziz Ansari gets candid about love: “elusive and sadly ephemeral” | Comedy | Interview | The A.V. Club
I weirdly do consider myself an optimist about love. In my Buried Alive show, I tell a story about a guy who meets his future wife when he goes to Bed Bath & Beyond to get Drano. They fall in love. And in the joke, I just talk about how amazing it is that all these random factors came together to make it possible for these people to run into each other at this particular moment in time, in a parking lot at Bed Bath & Beyond, and then fall in love. I’m an optimist—I feel like an amazing part of life is that at any moment, any of us could have that Bed Bath & Beyond moment.
love  relationships  longreads  humor  comedy  research  marriage  sex  technology  dating 
february 2013 by allaboutgeorge
The Persistence of Racial Resentment - NYTimes.com
Despite how controversial it has been to talk about race, researchers have gathered a substantial amount of information on the opinions of white American voters.
race  research  elections  obama  2012  2008  census 
february 2013 by allaboutgeorge
Tom Walsh: Detroit area has tech jobs base to build on | Detroit Free Press | freep.com
Southeast Michigan has the highest concentration of technology-related employment in the Midwest, and trails only San Jose, Calif.'s Silicon Valley region nationally in architecture and engineering employment, according to a new study to be released on Mackinac Island today.

The study, conducted by Anderson Economic Group of East Lansing for the Automation Alley business accelerator, compares the seven-county Detroit region with 14 other U.S. metros, including Boston, San Jose, Seattle, Atlanta, Pittsburgh, Dallas and Austin, Texas. Midwest metros included Chicago, Minneapolis, Cleveland, Cincinnati, Indianapolis and Grand Rapids.
detroit  michigan  technology  jobs  research  cities  business 
june 2011 by allaboutgeorge
How Drudge "stays on top"? Pandering on race, right-wing paranoia | Philly | 05/16/2011
We should by all means talk about Matt Drudge, but we need to be honest about who he is, who he influences and how -- and that is a far uglier picture that the one that New York Times readers got today. Of all the exaggerated, half-bogus story lines that have been spun on the Drudge Report, none has been more successful or more enduring than the legend of Matt Drudge himself.
journalism  media  race  bigotry  politics  bias  online  attention  research 
may 2011 by allaboutgeorge
WE ARE ALL AFRICAN NOW | More Intelligent Life
It is not the Rastafarian return to the Rift Valley that comes to mind as I listen, genetically elegant though it now seems, but the first hunter-gatherers making it through the Gate of Tears and heading for every point in our world.
science  evolution  africa  genealogy  research  nationalism  race 
may 2011 by allaboutgeorge
Android Momentum Plateaus, Says New Developer Report
The survey also asked about the always hotly debated "mobile apps vs. mobile Web" question and found the community closely split between developing native apps (48%) or developing "both" native apps and for the Web (42%). Only 10% of die-hards said we should build for the mobile Web only. Also of note, the number one reason developers were interested in mobile Web development was the ease of cross-platform development.
android  mobile  research  apple  iOS  software  technology  code 
april 2011 by allaboutgeorge
Mindfulness - Fully experiencing the present: a practice for everyone, religious or not - Page 2 - Los Angeles Times
"It's about people waking up, not being confined by any belief system. Awareness is bigger than a belief system."
attention  spirituality  religion  buddhism  research  health  behavior 
april 2011 by allaboutgeorge
Engagement, shovelware, magic bullets, and expanding the idea of journalism: Six themes from ISOJ | Mark Coddington
As expected, this year’s International Symposium on Online Journalism (my first) was an illuminating collision between the academic and practical sides of journalism — I’m sure most everyone left with a full set of ideas for newsroom initiatives, research projects, and the like. But if any of them are like me, they probably also find it difficult to properly process and mentally organize 40 presentations over the span of two days.
journalism  media  newspapers  social  business  twitter  research  conferences  community  aggregation 
april 2011 by allaboutgeorge
Why Exercise Won't Make You Thin - TIME
"You cannot sit still all day long and then have 30 minutes of exercise without producing stress on the muscles," says Hans-Rudolf Berthoud, a neurobiologist at LSU's Pennington Biomedical Research Center who has studied nutrition for 20 years. "The muscles will ache, and you may not want to move after. But to burn calories, the muscle movements don't have to be extreme. It would be better to distribute the movements throughout the day."
exercise  health  work  research 
april 2011 by allaboutgeorge
Study: Regrets? Women have a few, particularly in romance - Chicago Sun-Times
“Regret is something that can push people into better success in the future. It’s a motivator. ... It’s a benefit if you take a lesson and move on quickly. It’s a problem if you keep [re-living] that same regret over and over again.”
behavior  men  women  research  relationships  love  marriage  health 
march 2011 by allaboutgeorge
One Per Cent: Happier people tweet together
The researchers indeed found that happier people - those recording a high subjective well being - tended to be tweeting and receiving tweets from people who were also happier. The same was true for those who were less happy.

"It turns out that Twitter users are preferentially linked to those with whom they share a similar level of general happiness," says Bollen.
happiness  psychology  behavior  social  twitter  research 
march 2011 by allaboutgeorge
Francis Fukuyama’s New History of Human Social Structures - NYTimes.com
Much of what I read here reminded me strongly of Kim Stanley Campbell's "The Years of Rice and Salt."
books  nonfiction  science  behavior  power  culture  research 
march 2011 by allaboutgeorge
Who is Winning the U.S. Smartphone Battle? | Nielsen Wire
The answer depends on whether you’re looking at operating systems or manufacturers.
technology  mobile  apple  android  data  research 
march 2011 by allaboutgeorge
Breaking Down the DNA of a Hit Song - Speakeasy - WSJ
Going the way of long intros, at least in pop, is the ballad. In a field littered with thumping club tracks (see Taio Cruz’s “Dynamite”) and mid-tempo “sex jams,” as Frank calls them, the top-selling ballad was “If I Die Young” by the young country act The Band Perry—which topped out at only No. 59. With only a handful of rock bands represented in the top 100, including Paramore and Neon Trees, rockers vying for crossover success should take cues from prevailing pop trends, Frank says: “Now is not the time to go esoteric or to go heavy. No power ballads, for sure.”

Murphy and Frank also delved into subject matter, breaking lyrics down into some thematic categories. In pop, Frank found that 21% of the top 100 sellers dealt with maneuvering someone into bed (typically from the dancefloor); testifying about love was less common (17%); followed by falling out of love (16%), partying (16%) and sheer boasting (9%).
songwriting  pop  music  writing  attention  research 
january 2011 by allaboutgeorge
How The Stock Market Influences The Hot 100 Billboard Charts | Darwin vs The Machine
The higher the Dow Jones average, the more top songs are in a minor key. Booms are associated with slower music in a minor key while busts are associated with faster music in a major key. The higher the stock market, the lower the beats per minute. People use music to calm down in boom times and excite themselves during slumps. The strength of the relationship is too large to disregard. In the past, individuals in finance have used trends in music to try and predict the stock market. The relationship I have uncovered is significantly stronger.

This means that the stock market sets the mood, which primes us with regards to what music we listen to- not vice-versa.
music  pop  business  research 
january 2011 by allaboutgeorge
Internet Now as Popular as TV, Survey Shows - Digits - WSJ
So what are people doing less? Listening to the radio and reading things like newspapers and magazines offline, according to the survey. (We at Digits guess they might be spending less time doing other things too, like “going outside.”)
radio  newspapers  media  magazines  television  online  research  technology  shopping  business  attention 
december 2010 by allaboutgeorge
The Better-Off Online - Pew Research Center
Those who fall in the top earnings category are also the biggest consumers of online news sources, with 80% of higher-income internet users (74% of the general population) seeking news on the internet.

However, the higher-income households have not abandoned traditional media altogether; they also turn to print and television, especially for local news. Asked about various platforms where they might get the news on a typical day, 76% o those from higher-income households watch local and national news shows on television, 51% of this higher-income group said they get local news from a print version of a newspaper, and 22% read a print version of a newspaper for national news.Still, the online news consumption patterns of this more well-off group stand in stark contrast to those living in the lowest income households.
wealth  diversity  reference  internet  web  technology  usa  research  mobile  media  newspapers  journalism  news 
november 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Parsing Online Data to Find You a Date | Sam Yagan | Big Think
So it is a little bit of a marketing game, but it’s also a numbers game. So you should be reaching out to more people. Don’t be afraid about sending a message to somebody, even if you think you might be, you know, out of your league or not necessarily the best match for you. You have to go out there and you have to put those messages out there. You have to try. Don’t just cut and paste the same messages you sent to the last girl. Customize it. Think about "How do I actually get this specific person, guy or girl to write me back?"
dating  relationships  data  information  attention  presence  writing  identity  technology  love  research 
november 2010 by allaboutgeorge
State of the Blogosphere 2010 Introduction - Technorati Blogging
The significant growth of mobile blogging is a key trend this year. Though the smartphone and tablet markets are still relatively new and most analysts expect them to grow much larger, 25% of all bloggers are already engaged in mobile blogging. And 40% of bloggers who report blogging from their smartphone or tablet say that it has changed the way they blog, encouraging shorter and more spontaneous posts.
technology  blogging  research  online  web 
november 2010 by allaboutgeorge
The Stampede: Razorfish Reveals Latin America's Untapped Digital Consumer | Fast Company
Crump took his eager, former-journalist eyes into the favellas of Brazil to conduct consumer and digital ethnographies and found that a core part of reaching the vastly neglected consumer segment is via social media. Twitter, for example, is growing five times faster in Brazil than in the developed world, says Crump.
twitter  social  brazil  business  research  marketing  latinamerica  southamerica  mobile  facebook 
october 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Flexuality: Take the Test
Ever wonder if you are straight, gay, bi, or something else? Quit worrying about out-dated labels and find out how flexible you are!

The Flexuality Test assesses your attitudes, feelings, experiences, and desires. Your answers will be analyzed to generate a flexuality profile, with reference to one or more sexual types. The entire process is anonymous; you will not be asked for your e-mail address or any other personal identifying information.
sex  relationships  research 
october 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Email Still Tops Facebook for Keeping in Touch - eMarketer
Email is a more targeted form of sending content; while content-sharers may shoot off mass emails to large distribution lists, most email shares are likely sent to a person or small group selected based on the specific content being shared.

Sharing via social networks like Facebook, by contrast, typically involves feeding items to an entire friends list. The youngest users, who care the least about whether the recipients of their content actually want to see it, are also most likely to disseminate the information to the widest group. And the seniors and older boomers who find the recipients' needs more important dramatically favor email for sharing, suggesting they are sending relevant items to only those who will want them.
email  facebook  social  news  media  journalism  marketing  research  socialmedia  demographics 
october 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Smartphones bring mixed blessings for newspapers | Media | guardian.co.uk
The report found that men were almost 50% more likely to access the mobile internet using some form of app than women. About 46% of men who access mobile media use an app to do so, whereas just 35% of women do. Overall about 70% of UK users of mobile internet devices did so using a traditional browser, similar to the percentage for PCs – with 55% also opting to use an app.

Steve Ricketts, the Orange head of mobile commerce and marketing, said that one reason for the preference for mobile browsers over apps was because in the UK brands and retailers had made significant investment into developing websites that were easy to use via a mobile phone.
mobile  newspapers  research  men  women  technology  media  journalism  marketing  business  shopping 
october 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Further Improbables - NYTimes.com
What if, during the act that gave the world me — and you — the phone had rung in the middle of everything? Resumption on the parents’ part later would have resulted in — not me, or you, but “not-me” and “not-you.”

(I was 13 and in the bathtub again — where thoughts seem to hit — when this one did; I recall that, for whatever reason, it made my legs involuntarily jump, causing a terrific splash. Can someone explain?)

Resumption on the parents’ part would have meant an entirely different configuration of those eager little wigglers assaulting mom’s egg. Who, I wondered, would be in this tub now? Followed by the unsettling thought, “It might even be a girl.”
science  fertility  research  identity  biology  time  sex 
september 2010 by allaboutgeorge
About My Job: The Indologist - The Daily Dish | By Andrew Sullivan
The purpose of my field, then, is to understand something about the ways of being human in the world. And if I could find a single term to convey all that I’d be home free!
india  academia  humans  science  research  work  education  asia 
september 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Did we pronounce privacy dead this week? | The Social - CNET News
"That's where things get extremely messy," Boyd said. "These are Gutenberg-like changes here," Jarvis said, "so we don't know where it's headed."
class  facebook  privacy  social  public  technology  socialnetworking  power  authority  attention  research 
july 2010 by allaboutgeorge
The future is now at MIT Media Lab | Geek Gestalt - CNET News
"How predictable are people? We are using credit card transaction data to look at how patterns of human behavior change over time and space, and with which macroeconomic features these changes correlate. How does spending/merchant composition evolve as a region gets bigger/richer/more economically diverse? Do network features help to predict economic ones?"
future  technology  mit  media  research  massachusetts  economics 
july 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Embrace the Wonk : CJR
These powerful, simple explanations are often married to an almost monastic skepticism of narratives that can’t be substantiated, or that are based in data—like voter’s accounts of their own thinking about politics—that are unreliable. Think about that for a moment, and the challenge to journalists becomes obvious: If much of what’s important about politics is either stable and predictable or unknowable, what’s the value of the sort of news—a hyperactive chronicle of the day’s events, coupled with instant speculation about their meaning—that has become a staple of modern political reporting? Indeed, much of the media criticism on The Monkey Cage is directed at narratives that, from the perspective of political science, are either irrelevant or unverifiable.
politics  power  science  research  blogging  technology  journalism  media  news 
june 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Stress and worry ebb, happiness grows after 50 | Booster Shots | Los Angeles Times
We all know women live longer, but this survey makes clear it's a little harder on them than it is on men. At all ages, their reported levels of "enjoyment" are lower than mens'. At all ages, their levels of stress and worry are significantly higher than those of men. At all ages, their reported sadness is higher than mens'. Only their levels of anger were the equal of mens' throughout the lifespan.
women  health  research  gender  power  happiness 
may 2010 by allaboutgeorge
"For Better": The science of marital unhappiness - Nonfiction - Salon.com
It's not that if you have a bad memory of your first date that you're headed for divorce, but I think it's a useful tool to listen to yourself and your partner, and when you start to hear the negativity creep in, it's a red flag.

I was in marriage counseling at one point and the counselor wanted to hear about our first date, and I thought it was a ridiculous question. I thought we needed to talk about what's happening now, not what happened 20 years ago. And I wish she had stopped to explain that it does matter. Later, I would tell the exact same story and there would be a few little negative fingers in there. There's a big difference between saying, "We got horribly lost on our first date," and, "Of course, you didn't stop to ask for directions." It's the same first date but by the time he's being accused of not getting directions, you can tell that the relationship is going south. You can see that the structure of the relationship has changed.
marriage  relationships  love  science  research  books  nytimes  memory  story 
may 2010 by allaboutgeorge
The Lost Languages, Found in New York - NYTimes.com
“It’s hard to use a word like preserve with a language,” said Robert Holman, who teaches at Columbia and New York University and is working with Professor Kaufman on the alliance. “It’s not like putting jelly in a jar. A language is used. Language is consciousness. Everybody wants to speak English, but those lullabies that allow you to go to sleep at night and dream — that’s what we’re talking about.”
language  nyc  history  english  attention  research 
april 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Is Marriage Good for Your Health? - NYTimes.com
“When someone holds your hand in a study or just shows that they are there for you by giving you a back rub, when you’re in their presence, that becomes a cue that you don’t have to regulate your negative emotion,” he told me. “The other person is essentially regulating your negative emotion but without your prefrontal cortex. It’s much less wear and tear on us if we have someone there to help regulate us.”
marriage  health  relationships  love  family  brain  emotion  research  science 
april 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Stanford survey finds iPhone habit-forming - San Jose Mercury News
"One of the most striking things we saw in the interviews was just how identified people were with their iPhone ... It was not so much with the object itself, but it had so much personal information that it became a kind of extension of the mind and a means to have a social life. It just kind of captured part of their identity."
apple  iphone  mobile  study  research  academia  stanford  technology  ritual  attention  nokia 
march 2010 by allaboutgeorge
New York Museums - Post-Minimal to the Max - NYTimes.com
These things should be understood by now: The present is diverse beyond knowing, history is never completely on anyone’s side, and what we ignore today will be excavated later and held against us the way we hold previous oversights against past generations.

Message to curators: Whatever you’re doing right now, do something else next.
museums  history  art  creativity  curation  aesthetics  beauty  research 
february 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Sacramento professor asks 30-year couples what keeps them married - Sacramento Living - Sacramento Food and Wine, Home, Health | Sacramento Bee
[...] Communication, respect and shared interests are among the themes emerging from his interviews.

"These are not check boxes," he said. "You develop a communication style and openness, and from that comes common interests and respect for the individual. I'm trying to get my students to stop looking for check boxes and the ideal picture."

He also wants his students to learn that sooner or later, every marriage faces difficulties.

"The key is how you overcome obstacles," he said. "Every marriage that's together 40 years is not perfect all the time. These people had their problems, and they worked through them.

"Just because it's hard doesn't mean it's bad," he added. "It means you're working through something you're committed to."
marriage  relationships  love  communication  presence  research  family 
january 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Vital Signs - Study Finds Women Wear Shoes That Cause Pain - NYTimes.com
“I think women need to really pay attention to how a shoe fits and realize that what you’re buying could have potential effects on your feet for the rest of your life,” said the paper’s lead author, Alyssa B. Dufour, a doctoral student in biostatistics at Boston University. “It’s important to pay attention to size and width, and not just buy it because it’s cute.”
fashion  marketing  women  men  health  science  research  massachusetts  beauty  gender 
december 2009 by allaboutgeorge
Music mimics the emotion of speech - Telegraph
"There is a strong biological basis to the aesthetics of sound," he said
"Humans prefer tone combinations that are similar to those found in speech."
speech  sound  words  language  beauty  music  research  science  uk 
december 2009 by allaboutgeorge
Anthropology Matters, Vol 11, No 2 (2009) -- Being cool or being good: researching mobile phones in Mozambique by Julie Soleil Archambault (SOAS)
Drawing on my fieldwork experience in Inhambane, southern Mozambique, where I conducted research on mobile phone use amongst youth, my paper tackles issues of acceptance and rejection. As I sought to gain acceptance amongst youth I found myself participating in various controversial and, at times, dangerous activities that made me the victim of intense gossip and outright rejection by some. The fact that I came to the field accompanied by my husband and daughter only made matters worse. In this paper, I present the challenges of “being cool”, while also “being good”, and the repercussions of my research choices on my social standing. I then discuss how, instead of compromising my research, this predicament had a positive outcome by revealing social dynamics that might otherwise have remained hidden, namely the importance of concealment and the ambiguous role mobile phones play in deceit.
mobile  africa  research  science  social  behavior  ethics  family  story 
december 2009 by allaboutgeorge
Increasing Residential And Employment Density Could Mean Reductions In Vehicle Travel, Fuel Use And Carbon Dioxide Emissions
The committee disagreed about the feasibility of achieving the target density in the upper-bound scenario -- doubling the density of 75 percent of new development -- by 2050. Some members of the committee thought that these higher densities would be reached due to macroeconomic trends -- higher energy prices and carbon taxes -- in combination with growing public support for infill development, investments in transit, and higher densities along transit rail corridors. Other members thought that the high-density scenario would require such a significant departure from current low-density development patterns, land-use policies, and public preferences that it is unrealistic without a strong state or regional role in growth management.
transit  research  science  transporation  cities  environment  cars  jobs  work  housing  gas  urban 
september 2009 by allaboutgeorge
Imitation Promotes Social Bonding In Primates
"It has been argued that the link between behavior matching and increases in affiliation might have played an important role in human evolution by helping to maintain harmonious relationships between individuals," the study authors wrote. "We propose that the same principle also holds for other group-living primates."
friendship  relationships  science  research  fauna  attention  reputation  social 
september 2009 by allaboutgeorge
Female Supervisors More Susceptible To Workplace Sexual Harassment
"This study provides the strongest evidence to date supporting the theory that sexual harassment is less about sexual desire than about control and domination," said Heather McLaughlin, a sociologist at the University of Minnesota and the study's primary investigator. "Male co-workers, clients and supervisors seem to be using harassment as an equalizer against women in power."
discrimination  society  work  jobs  sex  bias  power  men  women  gender  science  research 
september 2009 by allaboutgeorge
Well - Divorce, It Seems, Can Make You Ill - NYTimes.com
In a series of experiments, scientists at Ohio State studied the relationship between marital strife and immune response, as measured by the time it takes for a wound to heal. The researchers recruited married couples who submitted to a small suction device that left eight tiny blisters on the arm. The couples then engaged in different types of discussions — sometimes positive and supportive, at other times focused on a topic of conflict.

After a marital conflict, the wounds took a full day longer to heal. Among couples who exhibited high levels of hostility, the wound healing took two days longer than with those who showed less animosity.
marriage  health  science  divorce  communication  friendship  relationships  love  research  happiness  exercise 
august 2009 by allaboutgeorge
Technology Review: Mining Social Networks for Clues
"Social media is like a cocktail party," he said. "In order to get something out of it, you have to give something up."
social  online  attention  identity  research  crime  media  presence  reputation 
july 2009 by allaboutgeorge
MediaPost Publications Most Americans Still Befuddled By Smartphones 07/02/2009
Women are far more eager to rate texting as very important (71% compared to 46% of men), cameras (55% of women versus 30% of men), listening to music on their mobile devices (44% of women versus 25% of men) and game functions (14% versus 9% of men.) Women were also more likely to rank GPS and book reading features as very important.

Men, on the other hand, are far more likely to rank calendar functions that link to their computers as very important (46% versus 39%).
gender  men  women  mobile  research  business  technology  location  games  photography  music  social 
july 2009 by allaboutgeorge
Prototype - Location, Location - It Still Pays to Be Near - NYTimes.com
“People here don’t talk sports at parties; they talk technology: what they are doing, what they are thinking about,” he said. “With all the new technologies and platforms being built in Silicon Valley, it’s like land opening up earlier in American history. If you’re here, you can learn first where the good land is.”
housing  geography  realestate  research  technology  location  relationships 
june 2009 by allaboutgeorge
ReadWriteWeb: NYC Waterfalls: How Real-Time Cellphone Data Can Impact Local Economies
Overall the analysis of digital footprints showed the impact of the waterfalls, and how they drove people to new parts of the city over time. MIT says that this type of information can feed tourism studies and help a city to understand the behavior of people (tourists) who can have a large impact on the local economy. This type of data would also be useful for urban planning, of future events and attractions.
technology  research  economics  travel  flickr  mobile  nyc  location  data  information  art 
june 2009 by allaboutgeorge
Research: Actually, Readers Would Pay For Online News | paidContent:UK
What most such assessments miss is the obvious distinction between mass-market readers and specialist, business readers, who are far more likely to subscribe to content. PwC’s online study, which surveyed 700 people in seven countries, saw the difference and concluded: “While the vast majority of consumers indicate that they are primarily interested in general news, a growing segment is increasingly demanding specialised, targeted and relevant information.”

Specifically, respondents said they would pay the equivalent of between €16 and €32 a month for news on paper, and between €6 and €12 for news online or on mobile. In fact, those aged under 50 are more likely to pay than elder people.
journalism  media  newspapers  uk  research  business  corporations  information  mobile 
may 2009 by allaboutgeorge
The future of the book turns a page | csmonitor.com
These are but a few of the possibilities of “books” in the digital era, says Virginia Kuhn, Associate Director of the Institute for Multimedia Literacy at University of Southern California (USC) in Los Angeles.

A professor who uses film as a classroom textbook and embedded video in her doctoral thesis, Ms. Kuhn is working with a new digital authoring tool dubbed Sophie (sophieproject.org).

The open source software was developed at the Institute for the Future of the Book, but the 2.0 version is under construction at USC with a grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

In a Sophie-created “book,” says Kuhn, think of the pages as being “thick,” or full of information sources. These might include video clips, music, narration, or a wide range of textual sources. The tools allow readers to go as far into the potentially unlimited additional material as they want to go.
books  publishing  media  education  academia  research  information  data 
may 2009 by allaboutgeorge
Brandweek: Study: TV Is Still King
Contrary to popular belief, younger consumers are not the biggest consumers of media. The biggest consumers of media are those in the 45-54 age group, dubbed the "digital boomer." The digital boomer, which on average has a daily screen time of 9 1/2 hours, watches a lot of TV, but also spends a lot of time on the computer. Screen time for all other age groups, including the 18-24 and 25-34 age groups, is 8 1/2 hours.
television  media  research  computers  aging 
march 2009 by allaboutgeorge
PR 2.0: The Ties that Bind Us - Visualizing Relationships on Twitter and Social Networks
What has evolved however, is so much more than the connection of friends and friends of friends. Social Networks have created a parallel friend/follower archetype that injects a homologous top-down network where individuals not only connect with those they know, but also with those who are interested in following their online activity, and not necessarily with the expectation of reciprocation. This injects a new dynamic into online social relationships, one that facilitates and fosters a less personal, but still meaningful engagement, creating an ambient, persona-audience interconnection.
twitter  data  socialnetworking  community  research  internet  relationships  social  marketing 
march 2009 by allaboutgeorge
Beauty Affects Men's and Women's Brains Differently | Wired Science from Wired.com
"In current hunter-gatherer groups, men are in charge of hunting; meanwhile women collect," said Cela-Conde. "If this is a scheme that can be extended to ancestors’ behavior, then we can think about a selective pressure to increase the capacity of spatial orientation in men, and the capacity to identify edible plants and tubers in women."
psychology  brain  science  research  beauty  men  women  sex  gender 
february 2009 by allaboutgeorge
Foreign Policy: Gays in Latin America: Is the Closet Half Empty?
In the first ever ranking of its kind, a student and I rated global cities on gay-friendliness. A city's rating was determined based on the number of gay-owned or gay-friendly establishments (e.g., bars, support groups, services) per capita. We studied the three largest cities with populations greater than 500,000 in each country, for a total of 180 cities.
gay  statistics  research  identity  latinamerica  cities  urban 
february 2009 by allaboutgeorge
Pew Internet: Twitter and status updating
As of December 2008, 11% of online American adults said they used a service like Twitter or another service that allowed them to share updates about themselves or to see the updates of others.

Twitter and similar services have been most avidly embraced by young adults. Nearly one in five (19%) online adults ages 18 and 24 have ever used Twitter and its ilk, as have 20% of online adults 25 to 34. Use of these services drops off steadily after age 35 with 10% of 35 to 44 year olds and 5% of 45 to 54 year olds using Twitter. The decline is even more stark among older internet users; 4% of 55-64 year olds and 2% of those 65 and older use Twitter.
media  blogging  social  research  socialnetworking  twitter  statistics  facebook  demographics  internet  status 
february 2009 by allaboutgeorge
Consumers skip Starbucks for plain ol' joe - Crain's New York Business
Coffee drinkers who have scaled back the most since the beginning of the year, according to the online survey of 500 Americans conducted between Jan. 14 and 15, are consumers aged 45 to 54, with fully half (50.4%) saying they have "cut back a lot" on fancy or expensive takeout coffee. That was followed by consumers 35 to 44 (37.5%) and 25 to 34 (33.3%). As might be expected, those who had trimmed the expense the most were in the lower of the survey's income brackets (48.6% earned between $20,000 and $39,000, and 33.6% earned below $20,000; the latter presumably included college students, who are a sweet spot for Starbucks).
But salary didn't appear to be that big a factor among the 92% who said they are cutting back on back on expensive coffee to save money: The percentage was close to even across all income levels, including $75,000-plus.
coffee  drinking  economics  beverages  caffeine  work  finance  research 
january 2009 by allaboutgeorge
Beyoncé's new single spells economic doom | Music | guardian.co.uk
"[...] According to findings by Phil Maymin, professor of finance and risk engineering at New York University, the more regular the beat on Billboard's top singles, the more volatile the American markets. After studying decades of Billboard's Hot 100 hits, Maymin found that songs with low "beat variance" had an inverse correlation with market turbulence. Which is to say, the more regular the song, the crazier the stock market. [...]"
music  business  finance  stocks  research  economics 
january 2009 by allaboutgeorge
Bush Data Threatens to Overload Archives - NYTimes.com
“I’m told researchers like to come and dig through my files, to see if anything interesting turns up,” Mr. Cheney said. “I want to wish them luck, but the files are pretty thin. I learned early on that if you don’t want your memos to get you in trouble some day, just don’t write any.”
cheney  data  information  politics  republicans  gop  wtf  research  history  government 
december 2008 by allaboutgeorge
Jack in the Box burger tops unhealthful list - Los Angeles Times
The $1 burger from San Diego-based Jack in the Box topped the ranking because of its hamburger patty and "hefty helpings of cheese and mayo-onion sauce," said Krista Haynes, Cancer Project staff dietitian. The item contains 23 grams of fat, 860 milligrams of sodium, and bacon, a processed meat that Haynes said was associated with increased colorectal cancer risk.

[...] After ranking the Jack in the Box burger as the worst choice, the group said that Taco Bell's Cheesy Double Beef Burrito was a close second. The burrito contains processed beef and nacho cheese sauce. It weighs in at 20 grams of fat, including 7 grams of saturated fat, as well as 460 calories and contains what the Cancer Project called "an astonishing 1,620 milligrams of sodium."

Burger King's Breakfast Sausage Biscuit ranked third on the list of five. The McDouble from McDonald's was fourth and Wendy's Junior Bacon Cheeseburger was fifth.
food  business  corporations  vegan  cancer  health  science  research 
december 2008 by allaboutgeorge
Strangers May Cheer You Up, Study Says - NYTimes.com
“There’s kind of an emotional quiet riot that occurs and takes on a life of its own, that people themselves may be unaware of. Emotions have a collective existence — they are not just an individual phenomenon.”
sociology  nytimes  happiness  psychology  health  social  friendship  relationships  emotion  research  science 
december 2008 by allaboutgeorge
Well - More People Appear to Be Cheating on Their Spouses, Studies Find - NYTimes.com
“I see a changing landscape in which the emphasis is less on the sex than it is on the openness and intimacy and the revelation of secrets. Everybody talks by cellphone and the relationship evolves because you become increasingly distant from whomever you lie to, and you become increasingly close to whomever you tell the truth to.”
marriage  love  sex  relationships  friendship  technology  identity  ethics  communication  research  polyamory  cellphones  mobile 
october 2008 by allaboutgeorge
A Commitment Pill? - Olivia Judson - Evolution - Opinion - New York Times Blog
"Examples of the socially monogamous? They include Kirk’s dik-dik, a small African antelope; the fat-tailed dwarf lemur, a small primate from Madagascar; the prairie vole, a North American rodent; some human beings."
science  love  relationships  research  health  animals  fauna 
september 2008 by allaboutgeorge
Talking Points Memo | Upcountry
"[...] You can look at states like Virginia, Ohio, Pennsylvania and other states and see the different numbers and they are all explained by one basic fact. [...]"
geography  pyschology  mapping  usa  science  research  politics  obama 
september 2008 by allaboutgeorge
US personalities vary by region, say researchers | World news | guardian.co.uk
"Some of the poorest states in the US ranked high for 'neuroticism,' which the researchers described as 'anxious, stressful and impulsive.' Those states, Arkansas, Mississippi, Kentucky, Louisiana and West Virginia, are five of the six poorest, measured by median household income."
psychology  research  science  usa 
september 2008 by allaboutgeorge
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