allaboutgeorge + privacy   60

Chilly Gonzales breaks down the essence of music
I want my music to be recognised, to be well-known; I want people to have an emotional relationship with it; I want it to mean something to them. But I care less and less if they project onto the person who made it.
music  creativity  reputation  attention  pop  classical  privacy  identity  beauty 
17 days ago by allaboutgeorge
The US government is using road signs showing drivers how fast they’re going to capture license plate data — Quartz
“License plate readers are inherently a form of mass surveillance,” investigative researcher Dave Maass of the nonprofit Electronic Frontier Foundation told Quartz. “You look at something like a wiretap and most of the time it’s looking for a specific person and capturing specific conversations with that person. But here they are collecting information on everybody, not all of whom have been accused of a crime, in case they may one day commit a crime. This is un-American.”
privacy  surveillance  police  law  traffic  cars  cities 
21 days ago by allaboutgeorge
Hanya Yanagihara: influential magazine editor by day, best-selling author by night | Books | The Guardian
The private,” she says, “becomes much more sharply private when you have a job, especially one that’s in the world. It reminds you on a daily basis of what people sound like, how they move, what their concerns are, how they think.”
news  work  magazines  writing  journalism  privacy 
april 2018 by allaboutgeorge
Twitter
activists should study epidemic theory to trigger precipitous drops & get attn of social media/shareholders
Privacy  from twitter_favs
april 2016 by allaboutgeorge
Log In - The New York Times
“What happens when someone doesn’t like me and has access to all that information?”
Oakland  privacy  survellance  from twitter
october 2013 by allaboutgeorge
Online security for journalists: never assume you’re secure | Online Journalism Blog
As I noted earlier, most journalists do not understand technology. Having an iPhone does not mean you know how it works – not in a way that the programmer who built it does. Relying on something you don’t understand to protect your sources is a big risk.
security  technology  mobile  journalism  media  privacy 
february 2013 by allaboutgeorge
Snapchat and the Erasable Future of Social Media - Businessweek
“Unarchived communication is our most primal form of communication,” she says. “It’s natural for us to go back to it for things like communicating with our friends and family, and not having to think about the fact that the Internet is forever. Ephemeral data is the future.”
twitter  facebook  privacy  photography  mobile  memory  law  presence  reputation  attention 
february 2013 by allaboutgeorge
Our data, ourselves - The Boston Globe
Instead of arguing about ownership and the right to privacy, they say, we should be imagining data as a public resource: a bountiful trove of information about our society which, if properly managed and cared for, can help us set better policy, more effectively run our institutions, promote public health, and generally give us a more accurate understanding of who we are. This growing pool of data should be public and anonymous, they say — and each of us should feel a civic responsibility to contribute to it.
data  information  creativity  health  privacy  census 
may 2011 by allaboutgeorge
Locus Online Perspectives » Cory Doctorow: Techno-optimism
Herein lies the difference between a ‘‘technology activist’’ and ‘‘an activist who uses technology’’ – the former prioritizes tools that are safe for their users; the latter prioritizes tools that accomplish some activist goal. The trick for technology activists is to help activists who use technology to appreciate the hidden risks and help them find or make better tools. That is, to be pessimists and optimists: without expert collaboration, activists might put themselves at risk with poor technology choices; with collaboration, activists can use technology to outmaneuver autocrats, totalitarians, and thugs.
politics  media  technology  data  activism  security  privacy 
may 2011 by allaboutgeorge
Why We Need An Open Wireless Movement | Electronic Frontier Foundation
EFF will be working with other organizations to launch an Open Wireless Movement in the near future. In the mean time, we're keen to hear from technologists with wireless expertise who would like to help us work on the protocol engineering tasks that are needed to make network sharing easier from a privacy and bandwidth-sharing perspective. You can write to us at openwireless@eff.org.
internet  activism  privacy  law  security  wifi 
april 2011 by allaboutgeorge
Brett Solomon Interview - The Most Important Site on The Internet Today - Esquire
I think the Internet in terms of roads: It's true that criminals use roads, but it doesn't mean you don't want safe passageways for the rest of the citizens! It would be naive to think that the Internet would be a rights-restricting space. We should deal with criminal behavior like terrorism in the same way online that we would offline. Any incursion into the rights of privacy and the rights of expression should be very carefully managed and should be the exception.
internet  technology  privacy  terrorism  infrastructure  power  communication 
march 2011 by allaboutgeorge
The Guardian Project | Open-Source Mobile Security | The Guardian Project
While smartphones have been heralded as the coming of the next generation of communication and collaboration, they are a step backwards when it comes to personal security, anonymity and privacy.

The Guardian Project aims to create easy to use apps, open-source firmware MODs, and customized, commercial mobile phones that can be used and deployed around the world, by any person looking to protect their communications from unjust intrusion.
android  privacy  mobile  technology  anonymity  security  communication  opensource 
january 2011 by allaboutgeorge
The Facebook Setting You Should Change as Quickly as Possible
By default, Facebook sends your access credentials in the clear, with no encryption whatsoever. Switching to HTTPS is important because a browser extension called Firesheep has made it especially easy for anyone sharing your open wireless network—at cafe or conference, for example—to sniff your credentials and freely access your account. One blogger sitting in a random New York Starbucks was able to steal 20-40 Facebook identities in half an hour. HTTPS solves this longstanding problem by encrypting your login cookies and other data; in fact the inventor of Firesheep made the software to encourage companies like Facebook to finally lock down their systems.
facebook  privacy  online  social  technology  mobile  browser  starbucks 
january 2011 by allaboutgeorge
Microsoft: Consumers Should Think Twice Before Broadcasting Location | Ina Fried | Mobilized | AllThingsD
Microsoft’s research found that privacy concerns are a barrier for some to adopting location-based services, particularly in the U.S. About half of overall survey respondents said they would be more comfortable with such services if they had more information on just who was seeing the information being shared.

The company also found that while 94 percent of consumers find location-based services to be valuable, they weren’t terribly willing to pay, and those who were often weren’t willing to pay more than $10 for such services. That seems to indicate more promise for advertising-funded services, especially since nearly half of those who have seen a location-based mobile ad have taken action on the ad–vastly higher than the response rates seen on traditional online ads.
mobile  marketing  business  technology  social  location  privacy 
january 2011 by allaboutgeorge
No Opting Out Of Facebook Turning Your Check-Ins, Likes Into Ads | Epicenter | Wired.com
If you click the Facebook Like button on any given site, that data is transmitted to your own Facebook profile and can be promoted by marketers in ads to your friends.
facebook  privacy  marketing  business  technology  social 
january 2011 by allaboutgeorge
I’m the mayor! So what?
It’s not so much about where you are as it is about why you are there. Simply checking in at the grocery store might not supply anyone with useful information, but noting that the grocery store is playing your favorite band, or that there is an outrageous sale on delicious baked goods adds a layer to the check-in that can really excited people. It’s about sharing experiences, because other people can relate to experiences.

As for mayorships and badges – unless gaining rewards (which come around once in a while, but not frequently enough), these provide a very basic function, which is that of a simple reward. One might collect mayorships or badges similar to the way we collected things and played games when we were children. You never got any real reward from winning a game of Monopoly, but you had fun while playing, right?
marketing  business  mobile  technology  location  identity  privacy 
december 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Rapleaf’s Web: How You Are Profiled on the Web: Tech News «
To be clear, I don’t have old-fashioned notions about privacy on the Internet. I know the realities of today’s Internet life. In order to enjoy the convenience of using web-based services, one has to make some sacrifices, and living socially online will eventually lead to an erosion of privacy. However, what I find egregious is how the information is surreptitiously collected all over the web, then aggregated to be sold, without us having any control or ability to look into that data. Sure we can opt out, but only if we know that we’re being profiled. (Ironically, you have to register to opt-out.)
identity  internet  privacy  security  email  marketing  business  media  power  reputation 
october 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Identity and The Independent Web - John Battelle's Searchblog
In other words, perhaps it's time for a Revealed Identity, as opposed to a Public or Dependent Identity. [...]

I think it's worth defining a portion of the web as a place where one can visit and be part of a conversation without the data created by that conversation being presumptively sucked into a sophisticated response platform - whether that platform is Google, Blue Kai, Doubleclick, Twitter, or any other scaled web service. Now, I'm all for engaging with that platform, to be sure, but I'm also interested in the parts of society where one can wander about free of identity presumption, a place where one can chose to engage knowing that you are in control of how your identity is presented, and when it is revealed.

One thing I’m certain of: Who I am according to Google, or Facebook, or any number of other scaled Dependent Web services, is not necessarily who I want to be as I wander this new digital world. I want more instrumentation, more nauance, and more rights.
identity  internet  privacy  reputation  marketing  business  power  social  relationships  technology  google  facebook  anonymity 
october 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Internet Founder Tim Berners-Lee Details 4 Concerns About Future of Mobile Web (Nokia World 2010)
[...] The last point also involved a project in which Berners-Lee is involved: providing Web access to the 80% of the world that doesn't go online. He works on this issue through the foundation at webfoundation.org, which examines the challenges in this area. Surprisingly, lack of signal with which to log onto the Web is not the main thing holding back the spread of the Web. 80% of the world has access to the Web, but, for some reason, chooses not to use it.

The cost of data is partially to blame in many cases for this, and for those who cannot afford data plans through their carriers, they're limited to SMS for sharing information. But SMS is very constraining, says Berners-Lee. What's needed instead are better, more low-cost data plans for mobile phones. [...]
future  internet  location  mobile  privacy  web  nokia  design  communication  ethics 
september 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Holman W. Jenkins, Jr.: Google and the Search for the Future - WSJ.com
Let's say you're walking down the street. Because of the info Google has collected about you, "we know roughly who you are, roughly what you care about, roughly who your friends are." Google also knows, to within a foot, where you are. Mr. Schmidt leaves it to a listener to imagine the possibilities: If you need milk and there's a place nearby to get milk, Google will remind you to get milk. It will tell you a store ahead has a collection of horse-racing posters, that a 19th-century murder you've been reading about took place on the next block.

Says Mr. Schmidt, a generation of powerful handheld devices is just around the corner that will be adept at surprising you with information that you didn't know you wanted to know. "The thing that makes newspapers so fundamentally fascinating—that serendipity—can be calculated now. We can actually produce it electronically," Mr. Schmidt says.
android  google  location  mobile  privacy  search  seo  future  marketing 
august 2010 by allaboutgeorge
On the Web's Cutting Edge, Anonymity in Name Only - WSJ.com
Calculating "bits" gets complex, as some facts about a person are more valuable—and thus have more "bits"—than others. ZIP codes and birthdates, for instance, are extremely valuable when zeroing in on individuals.

Bottom line: Mr. Eckersley determined Mr. Burney's location (the small town of Avon, Colo.) and his Nielsen demographic segment ("God's Country") together offered about 26.5 bits of information that could be used to identify Mr. Burney individually.

That's enough to narrow him down to one of just 64 or so people world-wide.
anonymity  privacy  online  marketing  identity  data  information 
august 2010 by allaboutgeorge
The Information That Is Needed to Identify You: 33 Bits - Digits - WSJ
How many pieces of information are needed to identify an individual? In the field of re-identification science, it’s 33 “bits,” specifically “33 bits of entropy.” (Information-science researchers refer to random pieces of information as “entropy.”)

Why 33? Because a “bit” is computer lingo for an on-off switch that can have only two values, 0 or 1. And 2 multiplied by itself 33 times is a bit more than the number of people on earth — 6.6 billion. Two to the 32nd power is lower than the world’s population. So, in theory, it takes at least 33 “bits” of information to uniquely identify someone — getting the pool of people down to 20, which equals one.

Each piece of information you add reduces the pool of possible individuals. But not every data point is worth the same number of “bits.”
privacy  twitter  mathematics  science  marketing  identity  technology 
august 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Did we pronounce privacy dead this week? | The Social - CNET News
"That's where things get extremely messy," Boyd said. "These are Gutenberg-like changes here," Jarvis said, "so we don't know where it's headed."
class  facebook  privacy  social  public  technology  socialnetworking  power  authority  attention  research 
july 2010 by allaboutgeorge
Tech Secrets: 21 Things 'They' Don’t Want You to Know - PCWorld
Don't despair. For every dirty little secret revealed herein, we describe a fix or a way to work around it (if any exists). You don't have to be a victim, if you know what to do.

Just remember: You've been warned.
business  privacy  security  technology  government  internet  mobile  copyright 
march 2010 by allaboutgeorge
How To Communicate Securely in Repressive Environments « iRevolution
Nonviolent resistance movements are typically driven by students, i.e., young people, who are increasingly born digital natives. With expanding access to mobile phones, social networking software and online platforms for user-generated content such as blogs, the immediate financial cost of speaking out against repressive regimes is virtually nil. So resistance movements are likely to make even more use of new communication technology and digital media in the future. In fact, they already are.

At the same time, however, the likelihood and consequences of getting caught are high, especially for those political activists without any background or training in digital security. Indeed, recent research by Digital Democracy research suggests that organizational hierarchies are being broken down as youth adopt new technologies. While this empowers them they are also put at risk since they don’t tend to be as consequence-conscious as their adult counterparts.
politics  internet  technology  culture  activism  protest  privacy  security  anonymity  howto  diy  communication  power  censorship 
june 2009 by allaboutgeorge
Technology Review: Unmasking Social-Network Users
"The structure of the network around you is so rich, and there are so many different possibilities, that even though you have millions of people participating in the network, we all end up with different networks around us," says Shmatikov. "Once you deal with sufficiently sophisticated human behavior, whether you're talking about purchases people make or movies they view or--in this case--friends they make and how they behave socially, people tend to be fairly unique. Every person does a few quirky, individual things which end up being strongly identifying."
identity  social  socialnetworking  facebook  privacy  anonymity  media  network 
may 2009 by allaboutgeorge
Comixology and the future of connected commerce | FactoryCity
It dawned on me recently that, not only are we in a period of great change and transformation, but that those of us who have been working on the web to make it a more social and humane place have only barely begun the process of taking the “personality-ization” (not “personalization”) and connectedness that we take for granted on the web into the offline world. [...]
comics  web  commerce  shopping  marketing  apple  business  attention  presence  privacy  online  social 
may 2009 by allaboutgeorge
Q&A: Foursquare co-creator on privacy, Easter eggs | Webware - CNET
"What cities are seeing the most activity?" "Crowley: The top seven in order are San Francisco, New York City, Seattle, Los Angeles, Minneapolis, Portland (Ore.), and Chicago. (I'm) frustrated that New York is always in 2nd place; Dodgeball was the same way."
social  mapping  geography  technology  mobile  cities  urban  privacy 
april 2009 by allaboutgeorge
A fearful India turns to video for security - The National Newspaper
"[...] This spring, [New Delhi] also installed cameras at 59 stops along its subway line. So far, concerns about privacy have been muted, likely because so much of the city remains outside of CCTV’s watchful eye – a far cry from London’s roughly 1,800 cameras, monitoring virtually every inch of public space. But there have been concerns about how surveillance footage will be used. The surveillance industry does not fall under any government legislation. [...]"
india  asian  transit  privacy  security  video  government  transportation  public 
august 2008 by allaboutgeorge
Google, 10 years in: big, friendly giant or a greedy Goliath? | Media | The Observer
"It is conceivable that future historians will regard the first day of Google Inc on 7 September 1998, and not 11 September 2001, as the true dawn of the 21st century."
google  online  usa  technology  privacy  information  business  media 
august 2008 by allaboutgeorge
Washington Post: Cruiser-Top Cameras Make Police Work a Snap
"It's a glimpse into the future. It won't take long before these things become pervasive, and the one thing we know about technology is it gets more advanced and cheaper as time goes on."
police  law  justice  cars  transportation  transit  technology  privacy 
august 2008 by allaboutgeorge
William Gibson Interview: William Gibson Talks to io9 About Canada, Draft Dodging, and Godzilla
"I believe people in the future will (sic) weild unimaginable tools of forensic transparency — and they'll aim them back at history. They'll find out about what every major player did all the way back with tools we can't imagine today. There will be no
scifi  sciencefiction  writing  history  blogging  privacy  security  canada  novels  books 
june 2008 by allaboutgeorge
Cellphones show we're creatures of habit - International Herald Tribune
"[P]eople hold on to their phones, and so the movement of individuals is more closely tracked than it can be with paper currency that is passed from person to person. As the researchers put it in the paper, 'Dollar bills diffuse, but humans do not.'"
news  mobile  research  money  communication  information  mapping  cellphones  geography  privacy 
june 2008 by allaboutgeorge
A VC: Can We Live In Public?
"I don't think you can expose yourself to 10,000 people a day and not get hurt on a regular basis."
socialnetworking  society  theory  twitter  security  public  privacy  love  life  flickr  culture  communication  blogging 
may 2008 by allaboutgeorge
A Whole Lotta Nothing – Stop asking, start filtering
"Instantly, no more PR spam from Alice, Bob, or Steve, forever, and I don’t have to ask to opt-out of something I never opted into."
publicrelations  google  relationships  privacy  e-mail  marketing  spam 
may 2008 by allaboutgeorge
cityofsound: The street as platform
"Freeze the frame, and scrub the film backwards and forwards a little, observing the physical activity on the street. But what can’t we see?"
academia  cities  computers  data  design  futurism  information  infrastructure  location  media  mobile  music  politics  presence  privacy  public  radio  research  scifi  social  sociology  society  software  story  technology  urban  web  wifi  writing  essay  film  sciencefiction 
april 2008 by allaboutgeorge
Annals of Communications: The Search Party: Reporting & Essays: The New Yorker
"[W]e’re going to make all the mistakes computer scientists running a company would make. But one of the mistakes we’re not going to make is the mistake that non-scientists make. We’re going to make mistakes based on facts and data and analysis."
business  culture  google  history  internet  law  marketing  newyorker  politics  privacy  story  toread  washington  copyright 
january 2008 by allaboutgeorge
Bush Intervened in Dispute Over N.S.A. Eavesdropping - New York Times
"I had just witnessed an effort to take advantage of a very sick man, who did not have the powers of the attorney general because they had been transferred to me."
bush  president  politics  gop  privacy  security  nytimes 
may 2007 by allaboutgeorge
Having Won a Pulitzer for Exposing Data Mining, Times Now Eager to Do Its Own Data Mining
"My concern is, what happens when the government comes in and subpoenas it? It's bad news to keep long, deep storehouses of information about how people use the Internet."
media  news  web  journalism  marketing  internet  business  privacy  information  corporations 
may 2007 by allaboutgeorge
Abbas Kiarostami - Iran - Film - Tales From Tehran - New York Times
"A car is a private, personal room in motion. It’s the only room when you are sitting in it; you don’t have to entertain guests. I spend a lot of time in the car. I love driving. If I were not a filmmaker, I would have become a truck driver."
cars  cinema  iran  nyc  aesthetics  privacy 
march 2007 by allaboutgeorge
New Profiling Program Raises Privacy Concerns - washingtonpost.com
"The idea is to troll a vast sea of information, including audio and visual, and extract suspicious people, places and other elements based on their links and behavioral patterns." (Ugh! "Trawl," not "troll"!)
privacy  government  usa  terrorism  civilrights  civilliberties  bush  encryption  social  information  politics 
march 2007 by allaboutgeorge
NYT: Planet Google Wants You
“You use something and in seeing yourself using it, you say to yourself, ‘Hey, I’m using it all the time, must be because I’m loyal to it.’ It becomes a virtuous circle.”
marketing  google  technology  memory  corporations  privacy  public  email  yahoo  www 
october 2006 by allaboutgeorge

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