allaboutgeorge + newyorker   19

Seeing the Future in Science Fiction : The New Yorker
By 1964, when I was negotiating puberty in the chill deeps of the Cold War, history itself had become the Atomic Disintegrator. In those years, I was drawn to science fiction (and mainly to its prose forms) for the evidence it offered of manifold possibilities of otherness. To a curious, anxious, white male child coming of age in an incurious and paranoid white monoculture, there was literally nothing like it—though a great deal of science fiction, possibly the majority of it, I was starting to notice, depicted futuristic monocultures that were dominated by white males. The rest, however, had as much to do with making me the person I am today as anything else did. Things might be different, science fiction told me, and different in literally any way you could imagine, however radical.
sciencefiction  literature  newyorker  fiction  identity  1960s 
june 2012 by allaboutgeorge
Errol Morris: Profiles
Quotidian lies, the little fabrications that make the commerce of daily life possible, if not always palatable, are laid on the surface by the speaker. A muted strain of implicit skepticism - the silent voice of the filmmaker - bubbles along just beneath that. Peripheral stuff turns out to matter. "I like the idea of making films about ostensibly absolutely nothing," Morris says. "I like the irrelevant, the tangential, the sidebar excursion to nowhere that suddenly becomes revelatory. That's what all my movies are about. That and the idea that we're in possession of certainty, truth, infallible knowledge, when actually we're just a bunch of apes running around. My films are about people who think they're connected to something, although they're really not."
film  cinema  story  newyorker  documentary  media  attention  presence 
march 2011 by allaboutgeorge
NSFW: On the Internet, Nobody Knows You’re A Journalist
No-one – absolutely no-one – knew they were looking for Seymour Hersh’s expose of Abu Ghraib, but by God did they pay attention when it appeared in the pages of the New Yorker.

(In the unlikely event that a writer at AOL or Yahoo had stumbled across the Abu Ghraib story, the throw-up-the-facts-and-iterate-later culture of web editorial would have slain it in the womb. Also: who buys banner ads against prisoner abuse photos? Maybe if it were a slideshow…)

Moreover, as the scramble for advertiser dollars continues to take its toll online, there exists a real opportunity for old-fashioned editorial curation to thrive on other platforms, both old and new. The joy I felt today flicking through the New Yorker – stumbling across Tad Friend’s wonderful piece about Lenny Bruce tribute actor, Steve Cuiffo and a short story by Woody Allen (Woody Allen!) before reaching the Armstrong profile – was easily the highlight of my day.
journalism  ipad  newyorker  media  technology  aol  yahoo  cable  television  curation  magazines 
january 2011 by allaboutgeorge
New Yorker web editor: The site is “guided by what’s on paper” » Nieman Journalism Lab » Pushing to the Future of Journalism
The most telling change, though, is as much about philosophy as it is about design. On the re-launched site, “we put less of the magazine online than we used to,” Eskin says. It’s a choice that will likely become more common as The New Yorker’s fellow outlets make key decisions about paid content. “Especially now that ‘Information wants to be free’ is no longer an article of faith — we wanted to tell our paying subscribers that they can access everything,” he says. “And to tell our non-paying visitors that there’s a lot that they’re missing.”
newyorker  design  online  business  ipad  mobile  media  magazines 
january 2011 by allaboutgeorge
Apple’s iPad, General Motors, and the shrinking middle of the consumer market : The New Yorker
This doesn’t mean that companies are going to abandon the idea of being all things to all people. If you’re already in the middle of the market, it’s hard to shift focus—as G.M. has discovered. And the allure of a big market share is often hard to resist, even if it doesn’t translate into profits. According to one estimate, Nokia has nearly twenty times Apple’s market share, but the iPhone alone makes almost as much money as all Nokia’s phones combined. But making money by selling moderately good products that are moderately expensive isn’t going to get any easier, which suggests a slight rewrite of the old Highland ballad. You take the high road, and I’ll take the low road, and we’ll both be in Scotland afore the guy in the middle.
apple  business  marketing  economics  newyorker  design  globalization  ikea  ipad  nokia  mobile 
march 2010 by allaboutgeorge
How Paul Krugman found politics : The New Yorker
Krugman explained that he’d become an economist because of science fiction. When he was a boy, he’d read Isaac Asimov’s “Foundation” trilogy and become obsessed with the central character, Hari Seldon. Seldon was a “psychohistorian”—a scientist with such a precise understanding of the mechanics of society that he could predict the course of events thousands of years into the future and save mankind from centuries of barbarism. He couldn’t predict individual behavior—that was too hard—but it didn’t matter, because history was determined not by individuals but by laws and hidden forces. “If you read other genres of fiction, you can learn about the way people are and the way society is,” Krugman said to the audience, “but you don’t get very much thinking about why are things the way they are, or what might make them different. What would happen if ?”
economics  politics  newyorker  interview  economy  writing  finance  sciencefiction  history 
march 2010 by allaboutgeorge
It’s About the Journalism: Think Tank: Online Only: The New Yorker
Professional journalism as we know it—independent investigations on behalf of the public; impartial witnessing of terrible events at home and abroad; independent foreign correspondence designed for American audiences and to address American interests; reporting on powerful institutions without fear or favor, and with a sense of fairness; the clarification of complexity—all of this is as much an accident of history as the symphonic music and opera patronized by the great European courts of the late eighteenth century.
classical  classicalmusic  music  journalism  media  public  newspapers  newyorker  usa  writing  identity  history  reading 
march 2009 by allaboutgeorge
Doing It: Books: The New Yorker
If “The Joy of Sex” was like “Joy of Cooking”—though in some ways it was closer to Julia Child’s “Mastering the Art of French Cooking,” what with its strong authorial voice and affection for elaborate undertakings, to which Comfort assigned French names like pattes d’araignée, cuissade, and feuille de rose—“Our Bodies, Ourselves” was like the “Moosewood Cookbook.” Everything in it was healthful, enlightened, nourishing.
books  sex  writing  1970s  newyorker 
december 2008 by allaboutgeorge
Raj, Bohemian: Fiction: The New Yorker
"My taste had been central to my identity. I’d cultivated it, kept it fed and watered like an exotic flowering plant. Now I realized that what I thought had been an expression of my innermost humanity was nothing but a cloud of life-style signals [...]"
newyorker  research  marketing  fiction  shortstory  story  business  corporations  identity 
march 2008 by allaboutgeorge
Annals of Communications: The Search Party: Reporting & Essays: The New Yorker
"[W]e’re going to make all the mistakes computer scientists running a company would make. But one of the mistakes we’re not going to make is the mistake that non-scientists make. We’re going to make mistakes based on facts and data and analysis."
business  culture  google  history  internet  law  marketing  newyorker  politics  privacy  story  toread  washington  copyright 
january 2008 by allaboutgeorge
Dept. of Labor: Strike Beards: The Talk of the Town: The New Yorker
“In my line of work there’s no opportunity to grow a beard. These shows are the organizing principles of our lives, and the moment they stop you start to go insane.”
culture  hair  newyorker  television  work  jobs  tv  nyc  aesthetics 
january 2008 by allaboutgeorge
Twilight of the Books: A Critic at Large: The New Yorker
"[T]he N.E.A. reports that readers are more likely than non-readers to play sports, exercise, visit art museums, attend theatre, paint, go to music events, take photographs, and volunteer. Proficient readers are also more likely to vote."
books  culture  education  literature  newyorker  reading  television  usa  society  science  publishing  psychology  history  toread 
december 2007 by allaboutgeorge
A Critic at Large: Candid Camera: Reporting & Essays: The New Yorker
"With a Leica, all you hear is the shutter, which is the quietest on the market. The result—and this may be the most seductive reason for the Leica cult—is that a photograph sounds like a kiss."
newyorker  photography  aesthetics  beauty  germany  documentary 
september 2007 by allaboutgeorge
Man with a Plan: A Critic at Large: The New Yorker
"[I]t’s true that in Spencer’s scheme of values the superficial was profound. In an 1854 essay on aesthetics, he declared, 'The saying that beauty is but skin-deep, is but a skin-deep saying.' "
history  newyorker  philosophy  aesthetics  beauty  art 
august 2007 by allaboutgeorge
Magda Mandela: Fiction: The New Yorker
"Both have their pluses. Young men have more energy and are less scandalous, unless they smoke crack on the steps or go telling lies to Errol. Old men are more dignified and have houses. Old men are Magda’s weakness: I LIKE A OLD MAN."
fiction  newyorker  story  uk  london  aging 
august 2007 by allaboutgeorge
DORIAN PURPLE: Musical Events: The New Yorker
"His songs can be maudlin, clever, obvious, as ornate as Versailles, as simple as pencils, hilarious, crude, breathtakingly wise, corny, and so musically rich that he seems to be working with instruments nobody else owns."
prince  songwriting  lasvegas  nevada  1980s  music  newyorker  magazines 
april 2007 by allaboutgeorge
NYObserver: Mr. Zakaria Builds His Own Utopia: Newsweek’s Superstar Has Empire of Ideas, Plus Island Colony
“I think that in the world as I view it, journalism by and large is better today than it’s ever been. Let’s be honest: The New York Times made plenty of mistakes 30 years ago. What’s different now is that people constantly catch them at it [...]"
journalism  media  newyorker 
december 2005 by allaboutgeorge

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